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Following the release of iOS 10.3.2 on May 15, Apple has stopped signing iOS 10.3.1, the previous version of iOS that was available to consumers.

Customers who have upgraded to iOS 10.3.2 will no longer be able to downgrade their devices to iOS 10.3.1.

Apple routinely stops signing older versions of software updates after new releases come out in order to encourage customers to keep their operating systems up to date.

iOS 10.3.2 is now the only version of iOS 10 that can be installed on iOS devices by the general public, but developers and public beta testers can download iOS 10.3.3, a future update that is being beta tested and could see a release in the near future.

Article Link: Apple Stops Signing iOS 10.3.1
 

Populus

macrumors 68000
Aug 24, 2012
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Valencia, Spain.
iOS 10.3.1 was a great release. I installed it on my iPad Air and runs flawlessly. I don't plan on updating any more, because iOS 11 surely will lag on 1GB RAM devices. And I don't like the new Control Centre xD

On the other hand, I've read iOS 10.3.2 has battery issues, so I'm waiting to 10.3.3 to upgrade my iPhone SE, wich currently is on 10.2. Probably, I won't update it anymore too, I see iOS 11 too cluttered on this 4" screen. And man, my SE is Sooo fast now....
 
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69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,838
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In between a rock and a hard place
I know that Apple gets criticism for not supporting older versions of its software, but having the majority of the iDevices on the same version is great when you're a developer.
I'm not a developer, so the answer to this question may be an obvious one. How does the majority being on 10.3.2 benefit a dev? Aren't there tons of devices still on other versions of iOS? Devs are still developing right?
 
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err404

macrumors 68030
Mar 4, 2007
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I really can stand consumers who refuse to upgrade. Older versions have known exploits. You put your own data and those around you at risk when you intentionally run outdated versions. Sure each update may have some issues, but these days security needs to trump stability.
 
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Audigy

macrumors member
Jul 17, 2012
66
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iOS 10.3.1 was a great release. I installed it on my iPad Air and runs flawlessly. I don't plan on updating any more, because iOS 11 surely will lag on 1GB RAM devices. And I don't like the new Control Centre xD(...)

I too consider 10.3.1 one of the best releases of iOS 10. I tried 10.3.2 two times with DFU(and had considerable drains out of the box both times) and all the betas of 10.3.3(which did not solved the drain issues), only 10.3.1 showed no battery issues whatsoever. It returned my 5S to its former glory.

(...)On the other hand, I've read iOS 10.3.2 has battery issues, so I'm waiting to 10.3.3 to upgrade my iPhone SE, wich currently is on 10.2. Probably, I won't update it anymore too, I see iOS 11 too cluttered on this 4" screen. And man, my SE is Sooo fast now....

You should update to +10.3 since your SE's NAND will benefit from APFS. It improves several aspects of data management which augments performance, while improving longevity since reduces write operations.
 
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Populus

macrumors 68000
Aug 24, 2012
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Valencia, Spain.
You should update to +10.3 since your SE's NAND will benefit from APFS. It improves several aspects of data management which augments performance, while improving longevity since reduces write operations.
Yes, I know, I should've upgraded my SE to iOS 10.3.1, but sadly, I didn't. Hopefully 10.3.3 won't have such terrible drain issues... but right now I'm not sure. It is a pity, because I want to stay on iOS 10, but I know APFS will benefit my device lifespan.
 
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B4U

macrumors 68030
Oct 11, 2012
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I know that Apple gets criticism for not supporting older versions of its software, but having the majority of the iDevices on the same version is great when you're a developer.
It is also great for the merchant when everyone buys nothing but the same things.
I don't want to call the developer lazy if they don't want to code for different versions of devices, but I am running out of vocabularies.
It is simply a proven fact that older devices runs slow with newer OS, so the consumer has every right to keep their device running an OS that is optimized for that.
 
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BiscottiGelato

macrumors 6502
Mar 11, 2011
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It is also great for the merchant when everyone buys nothing but the same things.
I don't want to call the developer lazy if they don't want to code for different versions of devices, but I am running out of vocabularies.
It is simply a proven fact that older devices runs slow with newer OS, so the consumer has every right to keep their device running an OS that is optimized for that.

I dunno if u r a dev.... otherwise calling developers lazy only shows how entitled people are nowadays....

The manpower to support a number of ver of fragmentation for a moderate sized app, which often goes for 99 cents or something, can easily be hundreds of thousands of engineering dollars. Not all developers is their own Facebook....

If you don't want the latest features, security patches and app compatibility, you probably ain't the ones that will compensate developers fairly for their work either. As a developer, I can totally do without these audiences and not develop for them. Not running a charity here
 
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Brien

macrumors 68040
Aug 11, 2008
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I really can stand consumers who refuse to upgrade. Older versions have known exploits. You put your own data and those around you at risk when you intentionally run outdated versions. Sure each update may have some issues, but these days security needs to trump stability.
Aren't we near the point where end users have no choice? I'm actually surprised Apple isn't forcing updates seing as Win10 and game consoles have been this way for a few years now.
 
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redheeler

macrumors 604
Oct 17, 2014
7,667
7,545
What about the iPhone 5C? Wasn't 10.3.1 the last iOS?
32-bit devices are supported until iOS 11.
I really can stand consumers who refuse to upgrade. Older versions have known exploits. You put your own data and those around you at risk when you intentionally run outdated versions. Sure each update may have some issues, but these days security needs to trump stability.
I have skipped iOS X on both my devices - iPad Air 2 on 8.4.1, iPhone 6s+ on 9.3.3. So, it's nice to know you can't stand me. ;)

Think I will finally be updating the iPad Air 2 to iOS 11 this fall, the new multitasking features are too good to pass up.
 
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macfacts

macrumors 68040
Oct 7, 2012
3,997
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I dunno if u r a dev.... otherwise calling developers lazy only shows how entitled people are nowadays....

The manpower to support a number of ver of fragmentation for a moderate sized app, which often goes for 99 cents or something, can easily be hundreds of thousands of engineering dollars. Not all developers is their own Facebook....

If you don't want the latest features, security patches and app compatibility, you probably ain't the ones that will compensate developers fairly for their work either. As a developer, I can totally do without these audiences and not develop for them. Not running a charity here

Fragmentation doesn't mean more work. It means a dev has to make his app work with the lowest common denominator if they want to support the widest amount of users. It means the dev won't be able to use the newer APIs, it doesn't mean more work.
 
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B4U

macrumors 68030
Oct 11, 2012
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I dunno if u r a dev.... otherwise calling developers lazy only shows how entitled people are nowadays....

The manpower to support a number of ver of fragmentation for a moderate sized app, which often goes for 99 cents or something, can easily be hundreds of thousands of engineering dollars. Not all developers is their own Facebook....

If you don't want the latest features, security patches and app compatibility, you probably ain't the ones that will compensate developers fairly for their work either. As a developer, I can totally do without these audiences and not develop for them. Not running a charity here
If the devs don't like to develop for the audience, they are not asked to do that. There are plenty of apps that clearly states that it is incompatible with certain older OS.
You are simply focusing on the one word that I used and think people are "entitled".
This is simply market economy at work. If the devs think there is not enough of demand, they are not required to supply.
On the other hand, the devs set the price where they think the market is willing to pay. No one forced them to make it go for "99 cents or something".
 
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macTW

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Oct 17, 2016
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If the devs don't like to develop for the audience, they are not asked to do that. There are plenty of apps that clearly states that it is incompatible with certain older OS.
You are simply focusing on the one word that I used and think people are "entitled".
This is simply market economy at work. If the devs think there is not enough of demand, they are not required to supply.
On the other hand, the devs set the price where they think the market is willing to pay. No one forced them to make it go for "99 cents or something".
You mention people as entitled. I'd like to add to that, in that consumers feel entitled to access to older OS's after choosing to update.

Apple has no reason to seed flawed and vulnerable OS. Just like consumers don't have to update.
 
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Guy Clark

Suspended
Nov 28, 2013
1,036
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London United Kingdom.
Never thought this is quite right of Apple to do this. I recall upgrading to iOS 8 and found myself wanting to roll back to iOS 7 but Apple had stop signing it thus making it impossible. In effect making the upgrade 'Forced'.
In the case of OS X there are no such problems. For example providing you had already downloaded OS X Mavericks from the App Store it was a simple case of downloading again and installing.
 
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xflashx

macrumors regular
Aug 12, 2016
170
532
I really can stand consumers who refuse to upgrade. Older versions have known exploits. You put your own data and those around you at risk when you intentionally run outdated versions. Sure each update may have some issues, but these days security needs to trump stability.
Yes, my old iPad 2 is now double secure on the latest version (iOS 9). First of all because the software fixed security issues, second because it is so damn slow it is now completely unusable.
 
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341328

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Jul 18, 2009
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It's probably time to update that icon. I'm loving the retro iPod on the right side. Haha.
 
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ScooterComputer

macrumors regular
Jul 28, 2011
188
183
As I've mentioned on 10.3.2 posts in other threads, I know that Apple Support had been actively having users on 10.3.2 with battery issues downgrade to 10.3.1. That is NOT a simple process, and requires iTunes and a lengthy download. I had surmised that Apple would hold the 10.3.1 signing window open as long as 10.3.2 (after 10.3.3 ships); my take from this move is that Apple has finally determined the root cause for the battery issue and it isn't isolated to 10.3.2, it exists in 10.3.1. In that case, downgrading users is perhaps only buying some time, is "painful" and Support cost intensive, and really is a ticking timebomb. I'm now guessing they've fixed the root problem in 10.3.3, with some high degree of confidence, and given they know the release schedule—which they obviously know—they're comfortable dealing with problem cases until 10.3.3 ships in a few weeks or so.
 
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j238

macrumors newbie
Aug 5, 2006
15
8
I'm not a developer, so the answer to this question may be an obvious one. How does the majority being on 10.3.2 benefit a dev? Aren't there tons of devices still on other versions of iOS? Devs are still developing right?

To answer your question, developers need to consider, and possibly customize for, each version of iOS that may run their apps. If an app might run on two version of iOS, that's less work than five versions of iOS.

In most cases 10.3.2 v. 10.3.1 won't make much of a difference. But, the 10 series v. the 9 series definitely will.
 
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MrGuder

macrumors 68040
Nov 30, 2012
3,005
1,996
I'm still on 9.3.5 iPhone 6s works perfectly great battery, better Music app.
 
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Xenomorph

macrumors 65816
Aug 6, 2008
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648
St. Louis
"Customers who have upgraded to iOS 10.3.2 will no longer be able to downgrade their devices to iOS 10.3.1."

After all these years, Mac Rumors still doesn't understand how iOS installs work?

Signing prevents installs of 10.3.1. Period. Any install. Upgrade, downgrade, reinstall, etc. It doesn't target downgrades.

People using 10.3.0 or 10.2.x (or any older release on any supported device) cannot upgrade to 10.3.1. People already on 10.3.1 also cannot reinstall 10.3.1.

Installs are blocked. Not downgrades.
 
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Act3

macrumors 68020
Sep 26, 2014
2,198
2,546
USA
I really can stand consumers who refuse to upgrade. Older versions have known exploits. You put your own data and those around you at risk when you intentionally run outdated versions. Sure each update may have some issues, but these days security needs to trump stability.

What about security updates for folks that don't have 64 bit devices? They just sol after iOS 11 releases?
 
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err404

macrumors 68030
Mar 4, 2007
2,520
619
What about security updates for folks that don't have 64 but devices? They just sol after iOS 11 releases?
To a certain extent yes, they are SOL. Their device is no longer supported and will continue to be vulnerable to existing exploits indefinitely. They are at risk similar to people who still run Windows XP.
That said, this issues is a red herring in the context of the article. We are talking about not installing a maintenance release.
Unfortunately newer major versions may impact performance, but as far as I am concerned, knowingly refusing to patch is irresponsible while participating on a shared network.
 
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