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Apr 12, 2001
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120820-unisys_logo.jpg


Bloomberg reports that Apple has brought in IT service provider Unisys to help with support for its corporate and government customers, a growing area of focus for Apple.
Unisys will provide maintenance and other services to companies and government agencies that purchase Apple devices, Gene Zapfel, a managing partner at Unisys, said in an interview. One of the first of its kind for Apple, the contract was signed this month, Zapfel said. He didn’t discuss terms of the deal.
During Apple's earnings conference call last week, Apple Chief Operating Officer Tim Cook noted that while Apple is not looking to offer business-specific hardware, the company is stepping up its efforts in enterprise sales in an attempt to bring more business and their volume purchases on board. Cook noted that Apple has seen great momentum in areas where employees are involved in the purchasing decisions, but that the company is building additional corporate-focused capacity to address the broader market.

Apple has in particular been looking to ride the success of the iPhone and iPad to new corporate market share across the company's lines. Apple routinely highlights the percentage of top companies piloting or using the iPhone and iPad, and has partnered with carriers to offer business-specific rate plans and support.

Article Link: Apple Taps Unisys to Assist With Business and Government Support
 

franswa za

macrumors 6502a
Mar 24, 2010
582
26
south africa
this move by apple is way overdue, business and government should be made more aware of apple's OS platform and hardware

this is a huge untapped market for apple and a good way to break microsoft's stronghold

and linux?
 

slu

macrumors 68000
Sep 15, 2004
1,636
107
Buffalo
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_1 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/532.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0.5 Mobile/8B117 Safari/6531.22.7)

As a former Unisys employee, this is shocking. For the past ten years they have done very little right and I honestly didn't think they would last this long. Good for them for thinking outside the box and for looking for new areas of growth.
 

vastoholic

macrumors 68000
Jan 28, 2009
1,957
1
Tulsa, OK
Somehow my national guard battalion commander received a government issue Macbook Pro mid last year. He said he was part of some sort of test group. Of course he was already an apple fanatic so he was just as giddy as me to see Apple products make their way into military use.
 

HyperX13

macrumors 6502
Sep 3, 2009
349
7
Whenever I see the name Unisys, it reminds me of the Monty Python skit where the guy is rolling around the wheelbarrow yelling 'bring out your dead!'
 

backdraft

macrumors 6502
Nov 4, 2002
332
13
USA
I wonder if Apple is testing the waters before committing to buy them out. Apple missed a great opportunity to buy out Sun and get into the enterprise. I'm not so sure about Unisys. On the other hand, if they do buy them out they can easily move them to the new NC datacenter.
 

longofest

Editor emeritus
Jul 10, 2003
2,880
1,538
Falls Church, VA
I wonder if Apple is testing the waters before committing to buy them out.

Doubt that. Unisys is in a lot of government services work that I don't see Apple being involved in. Do you see Apple running the U.S. Military's inventory tracking system? Or installing the US DHS's Land Border Integration project?

For now, Apple is going to simply be happy to supply the hardware and software, and leave it to others to support/implement it.
 

SandynJosh

macrumors 68000
Oct 26, 2006
1,652
2
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_1 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/532.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0.5 Mobile/8B117 Safari/6531.22.7)

As a former Unisys employee, this is shocking. For the past ten years they have done very little right and I honestly didn't think they would last this long. Good for them for thinking outside the box and for looking for new areas of growth.

You talkin' 'bout Apple or Unisys?
 

ChrisA

macrumors G4
Jan 5, 2006
11,870
703
Redondo Beach, California
Apple really needs this. If one of our Sun (now Oracle) servers goes down our suport contract with Sun says there will be a Sun engineer on-site within 30 minutes. If an Apple x-serve goes down what do you do, take it to the Apple store and wait in line? No. Apple needs to have fast response on-site maintenance world-wide just like all the "big guys" I could not seriously propose buying Apple equipment for business critical functions unless there was a very high level of service available. So this move is required

Unisys has been a "big guy" from the beginning. Their roots go back to the first commercially sold computer, the "Univac". The company has gone through some changes and they no longer sell vacuum tube powered computers but I did get to talk with a feild service engineer and he was able to tell me about some of the old guys he used to work with and they did service vacuum tube equipment so even if it's not really the same company, there is continuity with many employees.
 

rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Jul 11, 2003
27,397
12,514
Seriously. Does Unisys have the caliber of support individuals that Apple is looking for to fill a customer support role?


Why? Unisys engineers can't put on a blue t-shirt and not bathe for days at a time?
 

foidulus

macrumors 6502a
Jan 15, 2007
904
1
Apple really needs this. If one of our Sun (now Oracle) servers goes down our suport contract with Sun says there will be a Sun engineer on-site within 30 minutes. If an Apple x-serve goes down what do you do, take it to the Apple store and wait in line? No. Apple needs to have fast response on-site maintenance world-wide just like all the "big guys" I could not seriously propose buying Apple equipment for business critical functions unless there was a very high level of service available. So this move is required

Unisys has been a "big guy" from the beginning. Their roots go back to the first commercially sold computer, the "Univac". The company has gone through some changes and they no longer sell vacuum tube powered computers but I did get to talk with a feild service engineer and he was able to tell me about some of the old guys he used to work with and they did service vacuum tube equipment so even if it's not really the same company, there is continuity with many employees.

They do, if you pony up the dough for it. We had an enterprise contract with them(mid level, not the uber high stuff) but their support was pretty hit or miss. The phone support was absolutely terrible, the guy actually said "do you know how to open Terminal?" I was flabbergasted, are there actually OS X admins out there who don't know how to use terminal?

The email support was a little better though not great. If you prodded them enough you could eventually talk to an actual engineer, but if they couldn't figure out the problem they would just stop responding and I guess hope you would figure it out on your own(happened to me once).
 

foidulus

macrumors 6502a
Jan 15, 2007
904
1
They do this at about the same time they deprecate the Java platform and provide 0 concrete plans for the future. Guess which programming language is pretty pervasive throughout enterprise and government? That would be the platform Apple just deprecated.

If Steve thinks everyone is just going to jump on the Cocoa bandwagon he is off his rocker, Objective-C has very few libraries(such as DB interfaces, distributed messaging etc) that can really hold a candle to the Java libraries.

Hopefully Apple will say something concrete about Java soon.
 

alent1234

macrumors 603
Jun 19, 2009
5,688
170
after the army i did a year consulting IT for a DoD agency that gave MS a lot of feedback in designing Windows 2000 and 2003. if apple is interested in government business they need to open up, provide road maps and give access to API's before they are officially released.

other than that they will never win any business from enterprise customers except for idevices or a Macbook Pro for a director to show off to everyone else. and since the director doesn't do anything else other than check email or surf the internet, the IT people won't care
 

AnalyzeThis

macrumors 6502
Sep 8, 2007
443
1
Seriously. Does Unisys have the caliber of support individuals that Apple is looking for to fill a customer support role?
I doubt it, big time. They could not take care of their own business, sorry... 1:10 stock split in 2009. This does mean something, like when this "thing" is "going to hit the fan".
 

chrono1081

macrumors 604
Jan 26, 2008
7,841
2,448
Isla Nublar
Somehow my national guard battalion commander received a government issue Macbook Pro mid last year. He said he was part of some sort of test group. Of course he was already an apple fanatic so he was just as giddy as me to see Apple products make their way into military use.

This would be a VERY good thing for the military.

When I was in I'd always have to fix computers in my unit since no one else knew how. Once I got out and became a government contractor, I then would fix (although not as often) military units. Since the military switched to Vista its been non-stop problems since programs like Adobe Pro like to corrupt themselves and screw everything up. (And don't get me started on adobe digital signatures!)

I too knew people who used macs although they weren't government issued.
 

pmjoe

macrumors 6502
Mar 27, 2009
463
32
They do this within the same week they deprecate Java? Sorry, but this is again the equivalent of Apple punting on 3rd down.

If Jobs wants Apple to take anything seriously, they buy it. If they don't care about something, they shuffle it off to a 3rd party. Enterprise corporate and government customers should read this accordingly - Apple doesn't want you.
 

CFreymarc

Suspended
Sep 4, 2009
3,969
1,149
this move by apple is way overdue, business and government should be made more aware of apple's OS platform and hardware

this is a huge untapped market for apple and a good way to break microsoft's stronghold

and linux?

And the fact that Unisys took the deal is a big thing too.

Both of Unisys and IBM got smart around the dot-com days realizing their service agreements and customer contacts are worth far more than the big iron they sold. The big blue IBM mainframes along with the Sperry and Burroughs bequeath Unisys mainframes are now mostly huge data storage arrays for client devices.

Before you know it there will be Apple reps in DC and New York wearing suits and ties.
 
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