Apple Teams Up With 100cameras to Teach Chicago Students iPhone Photography Using iPhone 11

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Apple this fall partnered with 100cameras, a nonprofit organization that aims to teach photography to adolescents, providing participating students at DRW College Prep in Chicago with the new iPhone 11.

100cameras teaches the students how to use photography to tell their own stories about growing up in Chicago, using the iPhone 11 to capture photos. Angela Popplewell, 100cameras' co-founder, said that students were excited to use the new iPhone 11, and it was "incredible" seeing how they used the wide-angle and Portrait modes to "really capture their point of view."

"As the residents of a neighborhood in Chicago that is often overlooked, being given the new iPhone that had been released just a few weeks prior felt like a momentous opportunity," says Angela Popplewell, 100cameras' co-founder and CEO. Earlier this year, Popplewell, 100cameras' director of program operations Lydia Billings and the team started contemplating how their curriculum could be adapted to be more forward-thinking, relevant and accessible for young people in the US. ForPopplewell and her team, the new iPhone, with its built-in sophisticated camera features, was an important tool.
Apple's vice president of iPhone Worldwide Product Marketing Kaiann Drance said that it was "amazing" to collaborate with 100cameras on the project.
"It was amazing to collaborate with 100cameras and the talented and creative students at DRW," said Kaiann Drance, Apple's vice president of iPhone Worldwide Product Marketing. "The iPhone 11 camera with all its intuitive capabilities right there in your hand is such a powerful storytelling tool. To see the photos the students captured of the ways they see the world around them was truly inspiring."
Following each program, the photos that students have captured are sold through 100cameras with 100 percent of the proceeds going back to the local community partner organizations that 100cameras visits.

Some of the photos captured by students​

Additional photos captured by the students can be seen in Apple's newsroom article on the initiative.

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Article Link: Apple Teams Up With 100cameras to Teach Chicago Students iPhone Photography Using iPhone 11
 
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now i see it

macrumors 601
Jan 2, 2002
4,272
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Man the stuff kids get to play with these days...

Unfortunately I don't think anyone can become a good photographer using an iPhone.
A great photographer can make great pictures with an iPhone, but he surely didn't learn his craft on a point & shoot smartphone
 

LuciusWrong

macrumors regular
Jun 24, 2019
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Because photography with an iphone....is a separate from photography...with a camera?!

If they did something relating to their customer base interests, but not explicitly about their product, that would sound a bit less like an advertisement.

But it is just a publicity stunt.
 

ghost187

macrumors 6502a
Mar 18, 2010
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iPhone is an amazing point and shoot camera. But if this about manual controls, then I’d rather use my a7 iii.
 
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costeta

macrumors member
Jul 24, 2008
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449
iPhone Photography...lol, is that even a thing? Just point and press a button and you're done. but of course, learning about photography as a science and artform is a different thing all together, which is applicable to every camera
 

Unregistered 4U

macrumors 6502a
Jul 22, 2002
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Unfortunately I don't think anyone can become a good photographer using an iPhone.
I think the ability to become a good photographer starts with surprisingly enough, a camera. Practically, ANY camera :) Absolutely NONE of the great photographers today started out life with a camera grafted to their palms. There are a few who started out with a FANTASTIC expensive piece of kit as their very first camera, but the majority of them scraped by with whatever they could afford. And, back then, what they could afford was likely far worse at capturing images than current camera technology, whether it’s an iPhone, and Android or a point-and-shoot.
 

Harthag

macrumors 65816
Jun 20, 2009
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How about teaching kids math, reading, etc. instead of photography?
Why can't they learn those in addition to photography? I think this is great, publicity stunt or not. Gives the kids some enjoyment and something to look forward to. All photographers need to start somewhere. Perfect opportunity to get the kids interested in photography and then if they want to learn more, they buy a real camera. Creating a fun + easy approach / intro to photography is a good thing, people.

Teach em how to hold the thing first. That’d be a start.
I (think) I see what you did there? Maybe not...
 
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rick3000

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May 6, 2008
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You can't really teach photography on an iPhone. You could maybe teach half of photography, framing and post processing, but not the other half: lens selection, focal length, balancing ISO and shutter speed, because the iPhone does all of that automatically.
 
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LuciusWrong

macrumors regular
Jun 24, 2019
168
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iPhone Photography...lol, is that even a thing? Just point and press a button and you're done. but of course, learning about photography as a science and artform is a different thing all together, which is applicable to every camera
Well....because of Apple, we now have "pro" cell phones. So i would say that attempting to re-brand photography with an apple on it is consistent with the company's current direction.
 
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CarlJ

macrumors 68040
Feb 23, 2004
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Unfortunately I don't think anyone can become a good photographer using an iPhone.
A great photographer can make great pictures with an iPhone, but he surely didn't learn his craft on a point & shoot smartphone
You can learn to be a great photographer using most any camera - the learning/teaching is the important part. Lots of people who are great photographers started with mediocre cameras. The important part with the program described in this article is that there's some instruction involved. They could have gone with some other camera (say some $200 point-and-shoot), but Apple happens to have a supply of iPhones handy, so... Yes, plus, it makes nice advertising for Apple. If companies get positive PR for doing good things, I'm okay with that.
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Well....because of Apple, we now have "pro" cell phones. So i would say that attempting to re-brand photography with an apple on it is consistent with the company's current direction.
Except the phrase "iPhone photography" has been around for a decade at least. Apple didn't start that - iPhone-and-photography enthusiasts did. (I used to poke around on various "iPhone photography" websites, way back when, for pointers on which photography and image editing apps produced the best results.)
 

Lalatoon

macrumors regular
Jul 8, 2019
242
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I don't think iPhone or smartphone is the best way to teach photography because of heavy post processing of the images. What you capture in this kind of devices are not actually the real thing.

But kudos to Apple giving away iPhone 11 to these kids. If could be much better if they give away some DSLR also to really help this kids learn a lot about photography.
 

lunarworks

macrumors 68000
Jun 17, 2003
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You can't really teach photography on an iPhone. You could maybe teach half of photography, framing and post processing, but not the other half: lens selection, focal length, balancing ISO and shutter speed, because the iPhone does all of that automatically.
This sounds vaguely like the "you can't teach someone to drive in an automatic" line.

Personally, I think teaching someone how to frame and compose a shot, and things such as brightness and contrast, are more important than things like lens selection, since there's a very good chance a lot of these kids will never get their hands on a camera more technically complex than a smartphone.
 
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oldwatery

macrumors 6502a
Sep 16, 2003
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Another marketing stunt disguised as a feel good service for kids. How about teaching them on simple and affordable cameras instead of $1000 luxury smart phones. Apple's motives are so transparent its pathetic.
 

citysnaps

macrumors 603
Oct 10, 2011
5,260
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San Francisco
Man the stuff kids get to play with these days...

Unfortunately I don't think anyone can become a good photographer using an iPhone.
A great photographer can make great pictures with an iPhone, but he surely didn't learn his craft on a point & shoot smartphone
"Unfortunately I don't think anyone can become a good photographer using an iPhone."

I've seen many who have.

"A great photographer can make great pictures with an iPhone, but he surely didn't learn his craft on a point & shoot smartphone"

Ditto my above response.

Making strong photographs has very little to do with the camera or gear. It's about the person behind the camera, his/her life experiences, curiosity, imagination, creativity, desire to express, vision, and quickly making a dozen or two technical decisions that in the end produces an image that has the power to stir a viewer's imagination, release narrative, ultimately evoking an emotional response.
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I don't think iPhone or smartphone is the best way to teach photography because of heavy post processing of the images. What you capture in this kind of devices are not actually the real thing.
I think simple cameras, ie phone cameras, are ideal for teaching photography. Making good photographs is about seeing, not gear.
 

definitive

macrumors 68000
Aug 4, 2008
1,964
709
There's a "Chicago" and "shooting" joke in here somewhere, but it's a bit too early in the morning...