Apple TV all in one features? To good to be true??? Suggestions?

MacMike81

macrumors member
Original poster
Jan 15, 2011
63
0
Ohio
I just watched the Keynote and the Apple TV updates seem very enticing.

I am a very happy Dish Network user and also Netflix.

I noticed Apple must have paired up with Spectrum, Direct, and a few others to offer their content on the ATV. Offering a "All in one place" experience.

Can someone explain how this works? Is there a guide with all the channels? Is the ATV essentially a cable box?

What about the "pay for only the channels you want" type features?

I am looking to save a few bucks on my bill, not sure if I am ready to cut the cord. I watch a lot of auto racing... F1 and IMSA, Wife watches a lot of Tennis.

I am a 3rd Gen ATV user and these features and the Arcade app seems very awesome!

Thanks for the info and any other suggestions would be appreciated.
 
Last edited:

techwarrior

macrumors 65816
Jul 30, 2009
1,118
401
Colorado
On ATV4 and ATV4K, there is an app called TV made by Apple. It is similar to the TV app on iOS devices.

A couple years ago, Apple tried to convince app developers to use APIs to make their content available through the TV app, in addition to through their own apps. Some bit, some balked. Apple also tried to convince devs to use a Single Sign on scheme in which entering your cable sign on once would enable you to install and auto authenticate apps with the SSO.

The new TV App attempts to take this to new levels. Effectively, entering SSO credentials, any content you are authorized through that sign on would be available in TV app without needing to download the apps, kind of a cloud app approach maybe. Also, they added the ability to subscribe to things like HBO through TV app, billed via iTunes account.

Last year, they enhanced SSO and Spectrum was one of the few to sign on. The idea being, if you subscribe to Spectrum internet + TV, you don't even need to sign in, it auto-detects and authorizes content.

Apple plans to make TV App available on Mac in addition to iOS, then also on Fire, Roku, and a few Smart TV. Their hope is the Apple TV App is the one and only thing you need to subscribe to all of your entertainment content. It may take some time, and it is dependent on providers getting in on the game.

The benefit to providers is, they just need to agree with Apple and their content becomes available on a wide range of devices, no app dev work required on their part. The benefit to users is a single UI for all content, regardless of where they subscribe to it.

The TV app uses a different "Guide" approach, it includes content from a lot of different sources and categorizes into Sports, movies, TV Shows, Kids, etc. Once you select a category, options appear, some of which you can play right there, some of which you can rent or buy from right there. It does not have a traditional guide, so live TV is selected based on category rather than streaming live now, similar to selecting on-demand content. The idea of linear content, constrained by time is something that might get lost in all of this. TV Shows and Movies available on your timeline instead of when they want to broadcast is likely in our future. Sports and News have to stay real time, but not necessarily in the same UI you are used to.

ATV is effectively a cabe box replacement. However, not in the traditional sense. For streaming services like Spectrum, DirecTV Now (different that the SAT service), the ATV effectively is the cable box replacement, streaming content directly from the provider. Effectively, Apple is trying to push cable companies to make all content available over the www instead of over their cable networks.
 
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BODYBUILDERPAUL

macrumors 68000
Feb 9, 2009
1,601
1,247
Barcelona
On ATV4 and ATV4K, there is an app called TV made by Apple. It is similar to the TV app on iOS devices.

A couple years ago, Apple tried to convince app developers to use APIs to make their content available through the TV app, in addition to through their own apps. Some bit, some balked. Apple also tried to convince devs to use a Single Sign on scheme in which entering your cable sign on once would enable you to install and auto authenticate apps with the SSO.

The new TV App attempts to take this to new levels. Effectively, entering SSO credentials, any content you are authorized through that sign on would be available in TV app without needing to download the apps, kind of a cloud app approach maybe. Also, they added the ability to subscribe to things like HBO through TV app, billed via iTunes account.

Last year, they enhanced SSO and Spectrum was one of the few to sign on. The idea being, if you subscribe to Spectrum internet + TV, you don't even need to sign in, it auto-detects and authorizes content.

Apple plans to make TV App available on Mac in addition to iOS, then also on Fire, Roku, and a few Smart TV. Their hope is the Apple TV App is the one and only thing you need to subscribe to all of your entertainment content. It may take some time, and it is dependent on providers getting in on the game.

The benefit to providers is, they just need to agree with Apple and their content becomes available on a wide range of devices, no app dev work required on their part. The benefit to users is a single UI for all content, regardless of where they subscribe to it.

The TV app uses a different "Guide" approach, it includes content from a lot of different sources and categorizes into Sports, movies, TV Shows, Kids, etc. Once you select a category, options appear, some of which you can play right there, some of which you can rent or buy from right there. It does not have a traditional guide, so live TV is selected based on category rather than streaming live now, similar to selecting on-demand content. The idea of linear content, constrained by time is something that might get lost in all of this. TV Shows and Movies available on your timeline instead of when they want to broadcast is likely in our future. Sports and News have to stay real time, but not necessarily in the same UI you are used to.

ATV is effectively a cabe box replacement. However, not in the traditional sense. For streaming services like Spectrum, DirecTV Now (different that the SAT service), the ATV effectively is the cable box replacement, streaming content directly from the provider. Effectively, Apple is trying to push cable companies to make all content available over the www instead of over their cable networks.
WOW Beautifully explained buddy! Now I understand how it all works too! :) Thank you!
 

MacMike81

macrumors member
Original poster
Jan 15, 2011
63
0
Ohio
very great info! thank you!

So, it sounds like Spectrum is on board. that is a good thing, there offer service in my area and I would be able to "bundle" since I already have phone and internet.

The guide thing probably inst that big of a deal because I seldom watch random shows live. I ether DVR or know what time it starts and tune in.

I guess that's the next question, how will DVR be handled if I use the ATV as my primary "cable box"?

another thing I notice that was very strange, during the Keynote and the announcement of the providers that are playing nice with ATV the seemed to TOTALY avoid one... a big one... Netflix... what's up with that?
 

techwarrior

macrumors 65816
Jul 30, 2009
1,118
401
Colorado
very great info! thank you!

So, it sounds like Spectrum is on board. that is a good thing, there offer service in my area and I would be able to "bundle" since I already have phone and internet.

The guide thing probably inst that big of a deal because I seldom watch random shows live. I ether DVR or know what time it starts and tune in.

I guess that's the next question, how will DVR be handled if I use the ATV as my primary "cable box"?

another thing I notice that was very strange, during the Keynote and the announcement of the providers that are playing nice with ATV the seemed to TOTALY avoid one... a big one... Netflix... what's up with that?
Spectrum now offers a streaming TV service, it effectively replaces the cable TV service. I don't know a whole lot about it as Comcast is my local provider, ugh. From what I understand, Spectrum streaming does not currently offer DVR. But, a lot of on-demand content may negate or reduce the need for DVR. I do have a relative who works for them and shares some insights, but he is pretty low level.

Netflix thinks they should be the king of streaming and has never played well with others. That has served them well to this point, but might cost them dearly with Apple's new approach.

Again, the big thing for content providers is, if you can turn the keys over to Apple, you don't have to make and maintain apps for all of the popular platforms, Apple can now do that for you. That could be huge for Disney, and maybe for some of the other cable companies. Apple can become your app developer, billing service, and all you have to do is give them access to your content to stream to your subscribers.

Some articles suggest cable cos are starting to realize TV content is a dead business, the cord cutters are flocking in large numbers. It costs a lot to broadcast all of the channels, both in terms of acquiring rights, and distributing it. Think of phones before VoIP, you had expensive, dedicated hardware and networks, and it was costly. When VoIP came around, you could use your existing data networks, it offered easier provisioning, and the legacy systems have pretty much been eliminated. That is likely to happen with video entertainment, and cable companies that get in front of it could do ok. What it is likely to do is open video to competition, no longer having to subscribe from the cable company that lined the pockets of politicians in your area. With 5G Fixed wireless internet services, cable cos will be pinched out of the internet business as well, and Spectrum and others are already testing 5GFW as a replacement for the coax service.

The next 10 years will be an amazing time for home internet and video services. A lot of players will be wiped out, some will do well, and a few new ones will emerge as the major players. If Apple is successful, it could be far simpler for consumers, though not necessarily less expensive.
 

praterkeith

macrumors 6502
Oct 30, 2005
412
108
Montgomery, AL
For me to primarily use the ATV app, they’d need to incorporate some type of channel guide so that I can quickly browse in the traditional sense.
 

JBaby

macrumors 6502
Jun 14, 2015
300
182
For me to primarily use the ATV app, they’d need to incorporate some type of channel guide so that I can quickly browse in the traditional sense.
And this sums up this new era perfectly. Traditional is dead. New approach requires new thinking and new habits. I won’t be surprised when they don’t add a guide in the traditional sense. Netflix is doing just fine without a guide. Somehow we still know about their shows. And with services like Trakt.tv you can make your own guide. Trakt is really cool. I’ve used it for 5yrs now. It’s awesome! You should check it out if you haven’t already.
 
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Tech198

macrumors G5
Mar 21, 2011
14,620
1,678
Australia, Perth
On ATV4 and ATV4K, there is an app called TV made by Apple. It is similar to the TV app on iOS devices.

A couple years ago, Apple tried to convince app developers to use APIs to make their content available through the TV app, in addition to through their own apps. Some bit, some balked. Apple also tried to convince devs to use a Single Sign on scheme in which entering your cable sign on once would enable you to install and auto authenticate apps with the SSO.

The new TV App attempts to take this to new levels. Effectively, entering SSO credentials, any content you are authorized through that sign on would be available in TV app without needing to download the apps, kind of a cloud app approach maybe. Also, they added the ability to subscribe to things like HBO through TV app, billed via iTunes account.

Last year, they enhanced SSO and Spectrum was one of the few to sign on. The idea being, if you subscribe to Spectrum internet + TV, you don't even need to sign in, it auto-detects and authorizes content.

Apple plans to make TV App available on Mac in addition to iOS, then also on Fire, Roku, and a few Smart TV. Their hope is the Apple TV App is the one and only thing you need to subscribe to all of your entertainment content. It may take some time, and it is dependent on providers getting in on the game.

The benefit to providers is, they just need to agree with Apple and their content becomes available on a wide range of devices, no app dev work required on their part. The benefit to users is a single UI for all content, regardless of where they subscribe to it.

The TV app uses a different "Guide" approach, it includes content from a lot of different sources and categorizes into Sports, movies, TV Shows, Kids, etc. Once you select a category, options appear, some of which you can play right there, some of which you can rent or buy from right there. It does not have a traditional guide, so live TV is selected based on category rather than streaming live now, similar to selecting on-demand content. The idea of linear content, constrained by time is something that might get lost in all of this. TV Shows and Movies available on your timeline instead of when they want to broadcast is likely in our future. Sports and News have to stay real time, but not necessarily in the same UI you are used to.

ATV is effectively a cabe box replacement. However, not in the traditional sense. For streaming services like Spectrum, DirecTV Now (different that the SAT service), the ATV effectively is the cable box replacement, streaming content directly from the provider. Effectively, Apple is trying to push cable companies to make all content available over the www instead of over their cable networks.

So if Apple and content owners can't agree on channels, Apple gives then 'an alternative' Not exactly the right way, where all content is available in all countries, and will probably never get that far.

That would be 'the dream'
 

MacMike81

macrumors member
Original poster
Jan 15, 2011
63
0
Ohio
For me to primarily use the ATV app, they’d need to incorporate some type of channel guide so that I can quickly browse in the traditional sense.
The deal breaker for me is DVR...

TV shows/series can pretty much be watched on demand, but sports cant... and if your any kind of sports fan, waiting a day for someone to post the event online is a no go...
 

techwarrior

macrumors 65816
Jul 30, 2009
1,118
401
Colorado
The deal breaker for me is DVR...

TV shows/series can pretty much be watched on demand, but sports cant... and if your any kind of sports fan, waiting a day for someone to post the event online is a no go...
Some live streaming services include cloud DVR at no cost increased storage for a fee. YouTubeTV, DTVNow, Hulu Live, etc. Not all do, but to replace traditional cable, they will have to, and that is likely why Spectrum's streaming is DVR-less, they would rather you buy the traditional cable DVR service. Over time, they will have to include DVR to remain competitive.
 

MacMike81

macrumors member
Original poster
Jan 15, 2011
63
0
Ohio
Some live streaming services include cloud DVR at no cost increased storage for a fee. YouTubeTV, DTVNow, Hulu Live, etc. Not all do, but to replace traditional cable, they will have to, and that is likely why Spectrum's streaming is DVR-less, they would rather you buy the traditional cable DVR service. Over time, they will have to include DVR to remain competitive.
Is Tivo still relevant these days?
 

techwarrior

macrumors 65816
Jul 30, 2009
1,118
401
Colorado
Is Tivo still relevant these days?
Sure, for OTA and with a cable card, you can DVR with it. But streaming services don't permit DVR from TIVO, Tablo, HD HomeRun or any other similar box that I am aware of. These can DVR some content, but even streaming apps on these platforms (TIVO) cannot be recorded by the TIVO itself.