Apple Watch ECG issues

amir328

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Mar 29, 2019
3
0
Portland
My son's egg is opposite of all the other ECGs (myself and others). I showed it to a couple of Cardiovascular physicians and they think it is a bug or grounding issue. bellow is an example (attached) , and no it is not because of the wrong hand, QRS is not flipped!!! anyone else with this issue ?
 

Attachments


Ledgem

macrumors 68000
Jan 18, 2008
1,784
543
Hawaii, USA
It doesn't look flipped to me, because the orientation of the other waves (particularly P and T) seem to be proper. However it does look unusual for the Apple Watch ECGs. If you look at a sample 12-lead ECG, most Apple Watch ECGs resemble lead I or II (the standard lead used for rhythm strips, and that makes sense given what acts as the positive and negative "leads" with the Watch). For your son's reading it looks more like V1 or V2 with a very prominent T-wave, which would be unexpected unless the Watch isn't on his wrist, or if his arms and chest aren't anatomically in line with the average. I can think of a number of possible explanations for it but to clarify what it is, he'd need a standard 12-lead ECG. Probably not a life-threatening thing but I'm not his doctor and don't know the details of his life or health. If you have any concerns, I'd have him take it to his primary care provider for their thoughts.
 

amir328

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Mar 29, 2019
3
0
Portland
Did they do a regular ecg in office to compare
Not yet but I think I should to be safe. Cardiovascular physicians tell me this is not a representative of a true ECG , mine is though
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It doesn't look flipped to me, because the orientation of the other waves (particularly P and T) seem to be proper. However it does look unusual for the Apple Watch ECGs. If you look at a sample 12-lead ECG, most Apple Watch ECGs resemble lead I or II (the standard lead used for rhythm strips, and that makes sense given what acts as the positive and negative "leads" with the Watch). For your son's reading it looks more like V1 or V2 with a very prominent T-wave, which would be unexpected unless the Watch isn't on his wrist, or if his arms and chest aren't anatomically in line with the average. I can think of a number of possible explanations for it but to clarify what it is, he'd need a standard 12-lead ECG. Probably not a life-threatening thing but I'm not his doctor and don't know the details of his life or health. If you have any concerns, I'd have him take it to his primary care provider for their thoughts.
Thank you so much, I am scheduling an appointment with his doctor to be safe
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Just curios if you switch it to the other wrist is it the same?
It flips but QRS is still the opposite