Apple Watch in the oven

snawaey

macrumors member
Original poster
Jan 20, 2019
43
18
Hi everyone. I currently have a series 2 SS 42mm watch and looking to upgrade to a Gold SS series 4. I found a local PVD coating company that’ll match my current watch bands into the PVD gold the series 4 comes in. Now my question is I’d like to still maybe use my series 2 on days I will be doing more labor intensive work but I’m thinking it won’t look good as all my watch bands will now be gold. So I’m thinking of also blasting my series 2 with the PVD gold coating as well. We will heat mask the screen and ceramic back of the watch but I’m worried about the internals (especially the battery) if it can handle the high temps of the PVD coating method which includes being in a coating machine that gets in temperatures up to 350-400 degrees. I know it’s risky and I’m willing to take the chance as I have a good feeling the watch will turn on just fine after the process is finished but I’d like to get some input from the community. What do you guys think should I take the risk? Yes or no why?
 

StumpyBloke

macrumors 68000
Apr 21, 2012
1,584
1,120
England
Are you ‘effing kidding? LOL

I can’t believe for one second the watch is going to work after those temperatures. You’ll probably melt it. Rather than get gold straps (vomit-inducing IMHO) just leave it as it is and don’t risk it.

Or...have I just fallen for a joke post...?
 

jtara

macrumors 68000
Mar 23, 2009
1,826
433
I was going to ask "how did that happen", but I see it is explained that it hasn't... I was imagining getting too intensely involved in the Great Bakeoff.

Of COURSE you are going to fry the thing!

I had to lookup the PVD process temperatures, since you didn't specify C or F. The temps are in the range of 250C to 400C. That is H O T!

Think there might be some plastic inside the watch? And that's just for starters!

https://www.plastikcity.co.uk/useful-stuff/material-melt-mould-temperatures

And then there's this:

https://www.technic.com/sites/default/files/resources/Solder Alloy Melting Temperature.pdf
 
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snawaey

macrumors member
Original poster
Jan 20, 2019
43
18
Are you ‘effing kidding? LOL

I can’t believe for one second the watch is going to work after those temperatures. You’ll probably melt it. Rather than get gold straps (vomit-inducing IMHO) just leave it as it is and don’t risk it.

Or...have I just fallen for a joke post...?
No. I’m being serious. Thanks for your input.
 

Kerry78

macrumors regular
Sep 14, 2016
167
43
Id totally leave it but if you really want to then look at YouTube Disassembly and remove all the internals first!
 
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snawaey

macrumors member
Original poster
Jan 20, 2019
43
18
Id totally leave it but if you really want to then look at YouTube Disassembly and remove all the internals first!
Didn’t think the SS Watch had a tear down. Thank you I’ll look into that now.
 

Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
30,630
30,905
OP, do _Not_ do this. To me, this is a safety risk as well, putting an electronic device inside an oven at a high temperature is not something that I think is a smart decision. Also, aside from the battery that you already know that can you can damage, you’re likely going to damage the other components and seals.
 

iPhysicist

macrumors 65816
Nov 9, 2009
1,319
920
Dresden
Not a troll thread. Just an experiment with a watch I most likely won’t use much anymore. High risk great reward kinda thing.
You reward is a brick. It won’t work. The solder will melt on the watch’s PCB and cause lots of short circuiting or broken connections... and that is best case scenario. Your watch could also catch fire if the battery swells and presumably explodes.
 

KarimLeVallois

macrumors 68020
Feb 22, 2014
2,123
1,263
London
The watch shuts down from overheating in the U.K. sun, so god knows what will happen to it with those temperatures.
[doublepost=1548684414][/doublepost]
You reward is a brick. It won’t work. The solder will melt on the watch’s PCB and cause lots of short circuiting or broken connections... and that is best case scenario. Your watch could also catch fire if the battery swells and presumably explodes.
Perhaps a video of the experiment, rather than pictures would be better?
 

iApplereviews

macrumors 65816
Jun 3, 2016
1,447
885
The Internet
Hi everyone. I currently have a series 2 SS 42mm watch and looking to upgrade to a Gold SS series 4. I found a local PVD coating company that’ll match my current watch bands into the PVD gold the series 4 comes in. Now my question is I’d like to still maybe use my series 2 on days I will be doing more labor intensive work but I’m thinking it won’t look good as all my watch bands will now be gold. So I’m thinking of also blasting my series 2 with the PVD gold coating as well. We will heat mask the screen and ceramic back of the watch but I’m worried about the internals (especially the battery) if it can handle the high temps of the PVD coating method which includes being in a coating machine that gets in temperatures up to 350-400 degrees. I know it’s risky and I’m willing to take the chance as I have a good feeling the watch will turn on just fine after the process is finished but I’d like to get some input from the community. What do you guys think should I take the risk? Yes or no why?
The battery is rated up to 100C i believe so no on that. Other internals will begin to desolder around 380C so your pushing it on that after an extended period.
 

rgyiv

macrumors regular
Jan 30, 2018
202
58
Don't preheat the oven. If it warms up gradually with the watch already in it, it cooks more evenly throughout.
 
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Devyn89

macrumors 6502
Jul 21, 2012
290
253
You’ll almost certainly melt the battery doing that, I definitely wouldn’t.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
46,382
31,183
The Far Horizon
Hi everyone. I currently have a series 2 SS 42mm watch and looking to upgrade to a Gold SS series 4. I found a local PVD coating company that’ll match my current watch bands into the PVD gold the series 4 comes in. Now my question is I’d like to still maybe use my series 2 on days I will be doing more labor intensive work but I’m thinking it won’t look good as all my watch bands will now be gold. So I’m thinking of also blasting my series 2 with the PVD gold coating as well. We will heat mask the screen and ceramic back of the watch but I’m worried about the internals (especially the battery) if it can handle the high temps of the PVD coating method which includes being in a coating machine that gets in temperatures up to 350-400 degrees. I know it’s risky and I’m willing to take the chance as I have a good feeling the watch will turn on just fine after the process is finished but I’d like to get some input from the community. What do you guys think should I take the risk? Yes or no why?
Is this for real?

Have you taken leave of your senses?

You have "a good feeling"? Seriously?

To think to do this this beggars belief.

No. No. And again, no.