Apple Watch Performed Flawlessly

Soba1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 16, 2009
189
43
Wife and I went to Wal Mart yesterday and I decided to leave my phone home and take only my watch.
There was a minor pedestrian accident in the parking lot yesterday. An elderly man struck a woman as he was trying to park the car. Wife and I went to offer assistance. I was able to dial 911 and help assist with getting an ambulance to the victim. The only thing though is when they asked for my phone number a different number came up other than what my phone number was.

Lastly one thing I did notice and I haven’t paid attention to it with my phone but inside Wal Mart I’m sure due to all of the concrete the watch lost signal.

But just thought I would share this little tidbit. The watch is a nice little gem to have if you decide not to carry your phone. Sometimes I just don’t feel like taking my phone along.

Needless to say wife was impressed
 

matrix07

macrumors 603
Jun 24, 2010
5,478
2,162
Wife and I went to Wal Mart yesterday and I decided to leave my phone home and take only my watch.
There was a minor pedestrian accident in the parking lot yesterday. An elderly man struck a woman as he was trying to park the car. Wife and I went to offer assistance. I was able to dial 911 and help assist with getting an ambulance to the victim. The only thing though is when they asked for my phone number a different number came up other than what my phone number was.

Lastly one thing I did notice and I haven’t paid attention to it with my phone but inside Wal Mart I’m sure due to all of the concrete the watch lost signal.

But just thought I would share this little tidbit. The watch is a nice little gem to have if you decide not to carry your phone. Sometimes I just don’t feel like taking my phone along.

Needless to say wife was impressed
Using with AirPods?
 

Soba1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 16, 2009
189
43
Using with AirPods?
No without, next time I go with just my watch I will bring my Dre Beats will make it easier to hear. The volume was ok but the occasional background noise gave me a slight challenge.
 
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dave006

Contributor
Jul 3, 2008
3,434
710
Just West of East
I was able to dial 911 and help assist with getting an ambulance to the victim. The only thing though is when they asked for my phone number a different number came up other than what my phone number was.
Your watch actually has a different phone number than your iPhone. Check your account with your carrier to see / verify if the number that 911 saw was actually the phone number assigned to your watch.

What carrier are you using as they all call their solution by different names: NumberSync (AT&T), Digits (T-Mobile), NumberShare ( Verizon ) for example?

Note: you don't need to remember your watch's phone number or share it with contacts as the carrier systems make calls and messages from your watch to appear to be from your iPhone. Testing 911 from the watch is very limited but at this point I would guess that the 911 system was allowed to receive the individual phone number assigned to your watch or the 911 Operator made a mistake or possibly due to the audio levels / background noise that there was a miscommunication with the 911 Operator.

Dave
 

gjamesm42

macrumors member
Jan 11, 2017
70
66
Wife and I went to Wal Mart yesterday and I decided to leave my phone home and take only my watch.
There was a minor pedestrian accident in the parking lot yesterday. An elderly man struck a woman as he was trying to park the car. Wife and I went to offer assistance. I was able to dial 911 and help assist with getting an ambulance to the victim. The only thing though is when they asked for my phone number a different number came up other than what my phone number was.

Lastly one thing I did notice and I haven’t paid attention to it with my phone but inside Wal Mart I’m sure due to all of the concrete the watch lost signal.

But just thought I would share this little tidbit. The watch is a nice little gem to have if you decide not to carry your phone. Sometimes I just don’t feel like taking my phone along.

Needless to say wife was impressed
Next time you are at Walmart connect to their WIFI with your phone. Then your watch will automatically connect to their WIFI next time you're at the store without your phone.

https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT205547
 

Soba1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 16, 2009
189
43
Next time you are at Walmart connect to their WIFI with your phone. Then your watch will automatically connect to their WIFI next time you're at the store without your phone.

https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT205547
I’m with Verizon, thanks for the info
[doublepost=1527608748][/doublepost]
Next time you are at Walmart connect to their WIFI with your phone. Then your watch will automatically connect to their WIFI next time you're at the store without your phone.

https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT205547
I didn’t have my phone with me but noted for future use thanks
 

Endorphine88

macrumors 6502
Feb 12, 2018
260
187
Philadelphia, PA
The watch does generate another number, but you can still provide your regular number and calls will still get routed to your watch if you don't have your phone on you.
Also - Walmart and large warehouse style retailers like that have a lot of steel in the roof and walls of their building which causes issues with cell signal so that's typical. I've also hear they install blocking devices on purpose to make customers focus on shopping without distractions, but that's just speculation :)
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,291
4,286
Atlanta
[rant] Apple, Google, AT&T, Uber, Facebook, etc know exactly where you are. However call 911 and you must provide an address or directions. Something is wrong with that.[/rant]
 
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Lennyvalentin

macrumors 65816
Apr 25, 2011
1,429
783
Next time you are at Walmart connect to their WIFI with your phone.
Without sounding too paranoid, you might not want to do that (and same thing with a lot of other random access points provided by various corporations and vendors), as doing so is a common way of getting man-in-the-middled that may expose private information of yours including passwords used to log in to web services and whatnot.

What can happen is that some unknown bad actor sets up an access point of their own with the same SSID and password as the one you desire; your device then auto-connects to that one, and then the bad actor can function as a sort of malicious VPN tunnel without your knowledge, reading your device's requests to connect to whatever services you may be using, then presenting itself both as that service to your device and as you to the service, leaving your data potentially exposed in the middle as it passes through.

...Unless this security loophole has been resolved these days, of course. Still, corporations don't provide access points to the public in order to be nice. They do it to track you, keeping tabs on when and where your phone connects and probably what you do through that AP as well. So you may want to use your discretion anyway... *shrug*
 

rayward

macrumors 68000
Mar 13, 2007
1,616
58
Houston, TX
Without sounding too paranoid, you might not want to do that (and same thing with a lot of other random access points provided by various corporations and vendors), as doing so is a common way of getting man-in-the-middled that may expose private information of yours including passwords used to log in to web services and whatnot.

What can happen is that some unknown bad actor sets up an access point of their own with the same SSID and password as the one you desire; your device then auto-connects to that one, and then the bad actor can function as a sort of malicious VPN tunnel without your knowledge, reading your device's requests to connect to whatever services you may be using, then presenting itself both as that service to your device and as you to the service, leaving your data potentially exposed in the middle as it passes through.

...Unless this security loophole has been resolved these days, of course. Still, corporations don't provide access points to the public in order to be nice. They do it to track you, keeping tabs on when and where your phone connects and probably what you do through that AP as well. So you may want to use your discretion anyway... *shrug*

As a rule, you should always check with someone from the establishment as to what is the correct name of their official network and what is the password. If you don’t get BOTH of these, don’t connect.
 

Lennyvalentin

macrumors 65816
Apr 25, 2011
1,429
783
As a rule, you should always check with someone from the establishment as to what is the correct name of their official network and what is the password.
Yes, but this doesn't stop other people from setting up another, parallel network with the exact same name and password - and quite possibly using equipment with a stronger transmitter/better antennas, thus wider range to catch auto-connecting devices before their owners reach the premises of the official network.
 
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