Apple Watch Series 2 is Fine for Swimming, but Scuba Diving and Waterskiing Not Recommended

Discussion in 'iOS Blog Discussion' started by MacRumors, Sep 7, 2016.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    One of the key new features of the Apple Watch Series 2 is an improved water resistance rating of up to 50 meters under ISO standard 22810:2010, which by definition means the watch can be used for shallow-water activities such as swimming in a pool or ocean, white water rafting, and fishing without risking water damage.

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    These activities are in addition to the previous IPX7 splash resistance that allows for the Apple Watch, including first-generation models, to be worn while washing your hands or jogging in the rain. Many original Apple Watch owners also routinely shower and swim with the device, although Apple never officially recommended such activities.


    However, while the Apple Watch Series 2 has improved water and dust resistance, fine print on Apple's website says the device should not be used while scuba diving, waterskiing, or other activities involving high-velocity water or submersion below shallow depth, presumably including jet skiing and deep water snorkeling.
    Apple Watch Series 2 models are priced from $369 and will be available starting Friday, September 16 in the U.S. and select other launch countries.

    Article Link: Apple Watch Series 2 is Fine for Swimming, but Scuba Diving and Waterskiing Not Recommended
     
  2. hortod1 macrumors regular

    hortod1

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    #2
    Underwater snorkeling? I didn't realize there was more than one way to do it
     
  3. Mac 128 macrumors 603

    Mac 128

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    #3
    But surfing is OK!?

    That doesn't really make sense ... I'll pit a double overhead wipeout against falling off a wakeboard any day ...
     
  4. Nevaborn macrumors 65816

    Nevaborn

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    The Watch is rated to IPX7 I believe that only covers temporary submersion up to max depth of 1M. Scuba diving exceeds that.

    Waterskiing... fine in itself but when you go flying across the water like a rag doll it is the equivalent as smashing against the pavement. Why would you do that to your watch ?

    This is not so much a shocking revelation as common sense.
    --- Post Merged, Sep 7, 2016 ---
    You come off a board at lower velocity so it is no different than a dive in to a pool really as for as the stresses on the device are concerned.
     
  5. Debauch macrumors member

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    #5
    50 meters = 164 feet. How is that shallow and who is snorkeling deeper than 50 meters?
     
  6. Bubba Satori Suspended

    Bubba Satori

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    #6
    What about bobbing for apples at the bathhouse?
     
  7. Keniutek macrumors 6502

    Keniutek

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    #7
    It does not work like that ;).
     
  8. Someone256 macrumors newbie

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    #8
    So how does it work?
     
  9. djcerla macrumors 68000

    djcerla

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  10. Howyalikdemapls macrumors 6502

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    I imagine it's the velocity that the water hits the watch at. You'll get tumbled around in a surfing wipeout a lot, but it should be relatively low velocity. If you hit the water while wakeboarding then water is being blasted at the watch at around 20mph.
     
  11. Mad Mac Maniac macrumors 601

    Mad Mac Maniac

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    #11
    I've already used my Apple Watch 1 for waterskiing 3 times now. Not to mention dozens of times swimming in pools, lakes, and even salty oceans. Works like a champ. I bought my watch to use it, not baby it.
     
  12. CarlJ macrumors 68030

    CarlJ

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    #12
    No, no, it's, "WINDMILLS DO NOT WORK THAT WAY!"
     
  13. Loge macrumors 68030

    Loge

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    #13
  14. CarlJ macrumors 68030

    CarlJ

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    #14
    Meter ratings for water resistance are a simplification (from atmospheres), they mean that the watch (or other device) can withstand pressure equivalent to being/sitting in water that deep. If you gently, gradually lowered it down in water to that depth, it'd probably be fine. But as soon as you start waving your arm around, you're actually increasing the pressure on the watch significantly. So if you swim at 50 meters, the watch dies. Thus, "50M water resistance" doesn't actually mean you should dive to 50 meters with it (thats why they make 100M, 200M, and 300M watches - they don't expect many divers are going nearly 1,000ft down, but they're useful at much shallower depths). This also ties into why they don't recommend water skiing - when you fall off, you don't go very deep, but you can slam into the water pretty hard, generating rather astonishing amounts of water pressure.

    In other news, a "2x4" isn't actually 2 inches by 4 inches.
     
  15. Someone256 macrumors newbie

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    #15
    Thank you for the explanation.
    So if I'm swimming at sea or in the pool or just sitting in the jacuzzi I'll be completely fine? That's a 370$ device I'm scared that if something will happen Apple won't take responsibility for it.
     
  16. Debauch macrumors member

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    #16
    I just read up on how it works and, well, that sucks.
     
  17. CarlJ macrumors 68030

    CarlJ

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    #17
    Most pools don't go deeper than 15 feet, that should be fine. Googling for activities "appropriate" for various depth ratings would yield more information than I know (doesn't have to be specifically about the Apple Watch" (now I'm a bit curious what the "hit" is, pressure-wise, from diving off the high-dive into the deep end of the pool). And sitting in the jacuzzi should be just fine from a pressure standpoint, but I'd wonder about the heat; again, Google likely knows much more than I do on this (there are some high-end watch forums, like watchuseek that have likely covered this thoroughly, for various ratings and activities). If it were me, I'd probably wait for the reviews (and inevitable youtube videos) just to be sure.
     
  18. Three141 macrumors 6502

    Three141

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    #18
    Note to self, Swim, shower, put Apple watch in locker then proceed to Steam room and Sauna.
     
  19. jonnysods macrumors 603

    jonnysods

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    #19
    I'm just glad I can swim at a regular depth, pretty slick.
     
  20. McScooby macrumors 6502a

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    #20
    Watch series 1 is IPX7, not the 2.
     
  21. Someone256 macrumors newbie

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    #21
    So if this isn't really 50 meters what should I pick? The only differences between series 1 and 2 are the gps, water resistance and brightness.
    I don't think series 2 is worth the 100$ extra.
     
  22. McScooby macrumors 6502a

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    #22
    Get the 2 with Applecare + & just use, you'll soon find any limitations, or won't judging by how the series 1 has performed thus far!;)
     
  23. Someone256 macrumors newbie

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    #23
    Unfortunately i don't have AppleCare in my country
     
  24. McScooby macrumors 6502a

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    #24
    Apple currently charge $199 for an out of warranty replacement if anything did happen, but TBH just wear, enjoy & don't worry, the series 2 replacement prices prob would be too far off that!:)
    https://support.apple.com/watch/repair/service/pricing
     
  25. Superhai macrumors 6502

    Superhai

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    #25
    The clue is not in the numbers but in the standard, if something is rated using the ISO 22810 it is generally only marketed for swimming and surface activity. If they are rated with the ISO 6425 they are rated for divers.

    The reason is that the 50 m/3 atm is basically for one hour (not per swimming session, but for the total time the watch was tested) testing the watch performed by set specifications. There is no guarantee that it will be fine the next hour even if you had it back on land and dried it again. So essentially it means that you could use it one time for diving (to 50 m by the standards approach) when it is brand new, but then no sub sequential use. Wear on the sealants from the pressure are probably a major reason.
     

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