Apple Watch - the next big crime wave?

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by kdarling, Sep 14, 2014.

  1. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #1
    Okay, I don't usually start threads, but...

    It hit me that we're only recently starting to get relief via disabling, from all the years of iPhone thefts and muggings (which were turning more and more into murders here in the Northeast US, and which were causing crime stats to skyrocket).

    Has anyone heard what Apple's plans are (if any) to make stealing Apple Watches less desirable?

    Or any ideas how they could make sure that a stolen Apple Watch is useless?

    Thanks in advance. This is going to be an item that will be in clear view in many places, a lot of the time.
     
  2. antiprotest macrumors 65816

    antiprotest

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    #2
    Apple Watch - the next big crime wave?

    Once the watch leaves your skin you'll have to enter a pass code again. This has been widely reported so you should be able to find an article about this somewhere.

    I still think there will be some thefts and robberies though.
     
  3. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    #3
    Good question. Since Apple Pay is disabled once it loses skin contact, they should give users the option of bricking it as well once it's out of the range of the iPhone. Basically the equivalent of iPhone activation-locked for the watch.
     
  4. kdarling thread starter macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #4
    I thought that's for enabling Apple Pay using your phone's credentials.

    What stops you from pairing up that Watch with a different phone later on?
     
  5. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    #5
    Apparently you have to re-enter the passcode each time you put it on your wrist, but I'm hoping Apple will enable automatic detection of fingerprint authorization for those of us who have the iPhone 5s or later (in lieu of entering the passcode).
     
  6. Appl3FTW macrumors 603

    Appl3FTW

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    #6
    I'm concerned about this too unless apple impose a lock like the iOS lock which makes it a paperweight if it's locked
     
  7. dugbug macrumors 65816

    dugbug

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    #7
    Serious? Entering a pin once all day is too much?
     
  8. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    #8
    It won't bother me but Apple can most certainly simplify and streamline the process as they did with TouchID.
     
  9. Tanegashima macrumors 6502

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    #9
    For sure...

    Specially with those magnetic straps!

    I'm getting one with a buckle for the "more adventurous" days were you go out of your comfort zone.
     
  10. Julien macrumors G4

    Julien

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    #10
    I sure it will have this in a gen or 2. Apple needs to prefect a method of adding it to the touch screen since there is more where to put a detected finger print scanner (Home Button).
     
  11. 576316 macrumors 601

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    #11
    Of course. There will always be a bunch of thefts. Theives usually aren't intelligent people so it will take a while for them to realise it isn't worth stealing an Apple Watch. Even then I imagine there's some sort of black market they sell locked devices to.
     
  12. TechViking macrumors regular

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    #12
    It could possibly identify you using the sensors on the back. This way there would be no need for a pass code.

    Done right, your heart beat could be used as identification. The watch will have lots of data to learn how to identify your heart beat's pattern, since it will be worn by you all day, every day.
     
  13. kdarling thread starter macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #13
    These optical sensors don't get the actual heartbeat. They get the pulse rate, which AFAIK, isn't unique enough to be used.

    Now, an electrocardiogram reading of your heart's electrical signals, taken from your palm, has been proven to be usable as an identifier.

    So you buy a Watch. It needs to pair with your phone.

    If I have to enter a PIN on the phone each time they go in and out of contact, that would be painful, so let's say that's not required.

    So, you have to find your phone and enter a PIN each time you put on the Watch. I thought this was only for enabling NFC, because this sounds annoying as well. Not to mention that it makes using your Watch as a watch without your phone around, impossible. So I think it's only for NFC enabling.

    Not to mention, what if you need to get a new phone? How do you enable the new one?

    So it goes back to my original question about theft. What prevents you from stealing the watch and pairing it with a different phone? Mind you, you wont' be able to use the previous owner's NFC payments, but who cares. You just got a gold iwatch to user or sell.
     
  14. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    #14
    I'm actually thinking current generation and the watch gets the authentication from TouchID on the iPhone itself. So every morning when both are charged and ready to go, put on the watch then using your iPhone for the first time authenticates it.
     
  15. Julien macrumors G4

    Julien

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    #15
    What happens if you go for a run (or whatever) without your iPhone. You have some reason or need to remove the aWatch and put back on. Then what do you do?:eek:
     
  16. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    #16
    I believe once you enter the passcode (or receive the TouchID authentication as I'm hoping it will), it's active as long as it remains on your skin. But if you do need to remove it just enter the passcode as normal (as we all do if TouchID isn't working at the moment due to wet finger from showering, etc.).

    Apple Pay might be another story though but you won't be able to do that with the watch alone anyway.
     
  17. TechViking macrumors regular

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    #17
    The pulse rate ( like 60 bpm ) is calculated by these sensors by measuring the changes in blood flowing through the blood vessels under the skin on your wrist. These changes are created by your heart beat.

    I am sure that the pattern that your heart beat is creating can be made at least as unique as a 4-digit pin code.
     
  18. larmende macrumors member

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    #18
    Bloody hell, you really trying hard to find a fault. What happened if your arm falls off? Clearly this is a design error as well?
     
  19. Julien macrumors G4

    Julien

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    #19
    You are completely incorrect. I believe the 1st gen aWatch will be passcode authorized and not touch ID authorized (probably not even through your iPhone). I have no problem using a passcode until a proper fingerprint reading can be integrated into the screen.

    How is that "...really trying hard to find a fault..."?
     
  20. iBighouse macrumors 6502a

    iBighouse

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    #20
    I too have a concern for safety and the ease with which a magnetically attached Watch might be swiped from someone's wrist.

    But, even worse, I fear this scenario:

    Criminal: Give me your watch AND and your iphone...I know you have an iPhone because I see you've got an Watch.

    Me: Okay, just don't hurt anyone.

    Criminal: Okay, now that I've got your iPhone and your Watch strapped to my wrist and in contact with my skin, tell me your passcode so I can start charging things with NFC and your Watch.
     
  21. TechViking macrumors regular

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    #21
    How is that scenario less safe than if a thief is robbing you of your credit card and forcing you to tell him your passcode/pin to the card?
     
  22. iBighouse, Sep 15, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2014

    iBighouse macrumors 6502a

    iBighouse

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    #22
    Because, with a credit card purchase the cashier asks to see a photo ID. It looked to me in the 9.9.14 presentation that the iPhone and Watch won't require any such photoID to be presented to the cashier. Just grab a bunch of merchandise and wave your criminal wrist at the NFC thingee.

    Even so, I'm still buying one. ;)
     
  23. TechViking macrumors regular

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    #23
    Show a photoID? I guess things are done differently where you are.

    If I buy something in a store I just put in the credit card in the reader and enter my 4-digit pin.

    The only time a photoID is needed is if I dont have the passcode.
     
  24. iBighouse macrumors 6502a

    iBighouse

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    #24
    Most all stores I go into always ask for a photo ID on any of my credit card purchases UNLESS the amount is less than a certain amount, like $25 I think.

    I assumed this was common practice at all retailers?
     
  25. bransoj macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 31, 2013
    #25
    The thing with the magnetic ones is they loop through themselves and then attach magnetically as can be seen here :-

    [​IMG]

    Even if someone managed to undo the magnet they would still then need to loosen the strap and thread it over your wrist which is suspect would be rather noticeable! Its not like its a case of undo the magnetic connection and it falls off the wrist!
     

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