Apple watch won't wake up when near NFC reader like the iPhone 6/6Plus

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by jst1nt, Feb 10, 2015.

  1. jst1nt macrumors regular

    jst1nt

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    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Albany, NY
    #1
    I thought this was interesting....

    "Apple Watch

    Double-click to pay and go. You can pay with Apple Watch — just double‑click the button next to the Digital Crown and hold the face of your Apple Watch near the contactless reader. A gentle pulse and beep confirm that your payment information was sent."
    https://www.apple.com/apple-pay/

    I assume this is to save on battery life (considering Apple is already struggling for battery life) so that the watch isn't constantly searching for NFC reader.....
     
  2. The Doctor11 macrumors 603

    The Doctor11

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    Dec 15, 2013
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    New York
    #2
    I think this is just so you don't pay accidentally. Pretty hard to hold your phone to a NFC reader on accident, but pretty easy to do with a watch.
     
  3. jst1nt thread starter macrumors regular

    jst1nt

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    Albany, NY
    #3

    That makes sense.... wasn't thinking about that.
     
  4. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

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    Atlanta
    #4
    Also it is probably more to do with security. If a NFC comes in contact with your iPhone you must use your Finger Print ID to authorize the transaction. The :apple:Watch doesn't have this. So someone could hold a NFC 'spoofer' next to your :apple:Watch and make an unauthorized transaction. So using the Crown for the authorization prevents this.
     
  5. jamesjingyi macrumors 6502a

    jamesjingyi

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    UK
    #5
    Watch sounds cool in this sense but they would have to build in some way of cutting it off if someone stole it. I mean it would be devastating if someone got your watch and paid for **** tons of stuff with it before you could stop them..
     
  6. jst1nt thread starter macrumors regular

    jst1nt

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    #6
    I believe that when it looses contact with the skin you have to reenter the passcode to unlock the apple watch.
     
  7. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

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    Feb 23, 2010
    #7
    I'm guessing there must be a delay, what 30 seconds or a minute?

    What do you think?
     
  8. The Doctor11 macrumors 603

    The Doctor11

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    #8
    I'm thinking no delay.
     
  9. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

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    Feb 23, 2010
    #9
    The reason I think there must be a delay is for the time you adjust the watch on your wrist, or due to strap tightness it slips on your wrist.

    If the watch moves against your skin, it would I'm sure mess it's monitoring signals up for a few moments, hence me thinking there must be some small delay before it's sure it's signal loss is that you've taken it off as opposed to you have just readjusted it's position.
     
  10. jamesjingyi macrumors 6502a

    jamesjingyi

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    UK
    #10
    Now that is pretty cool :D
     
  11. BvizioN macrumors 601

    BvizioN

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    Manchester, UK
    #11
    My guess it there could be a smart way to differentiate movements around your wrist from completely being removed from your wrist.
     
  12. Runt888 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    #12
    I'm willing to bet that it can tell roughly how far it is from your skin (it has multiple photosensors in slightly different locations so calculating a distance shouldn't be difficult). That being the case, it should be able to tell the difference between adjusting/moving on your wrist and being taken off completely.
     
  13. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    Jun 9, 2007
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    First university coding class = 46 years ago
    #13
    The question that's been brought up before is:

    Is it using just proximity, or something more sophisticated?

    If just proximity, then sliding something under it would fool the sensors, while you remove the watch.

    If it looks for a pulse once in a while, then the question is what is the delay, and can something with a pattern on it be used to slide back and forth and fool the sensors until it's on a new wrist.

    Of course, if it also checks for Bluetooth connection to the owner's phone, that helps a lot. A thief walking away with the watch, would soon find it locked.
     

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