Apple Will Repair HomePod Power Cables For $29, But Warns They 'Should Not Be Removed'

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While a Reddit user recently demonstrated that the HomePod's power cable can technically be disconnected from the speaker by pulling on it with a lot of force, Apple warns that it should not be removed, according to an internal document distributed to Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers.


Apple's internal HomePod Service Readiness Guide, obtained by MacRumors, states that detaching the HomePod's power cable could potentially cause damage to the speaker's internal components or to the cable itself:
The HomePod includes a built-in power cable that should not be removed.

In the rare instance that the cable is detached or damaged, do not attempt to remove or plug it back into HomePod. If the cable is removed or impaired, damage could have occurred to the cable or the internal components of HomePod.
If the power cable is damaged due to an unintentional reason, such as a dog chewing on it, Apple notes the HomePod can be mailed to one of its repair centers and fixed for a flat-rate out-of-warranty fee of $29 plus tax in the United States, £25 including VAT in the UK, and $39 including GST in Australia.

Out-of-warranty essentially means that the flat-rate cable repair fee is available to any customer at any time. The affected HomePod does not need to be within Apple's limited one-year warranty period, nor is AppleCare+ required.

The only requirement is that the HomePod passes Apple's visual-mechanical inspection, which checks for other external or internal damage. If the HomePod does not pass, but is still eligible for repair, then the only option is a whole-speaker replacement for $279 in the United States, £268 in the UK, and $399 in Australia.

The whole-replacement fee is also applicable to mostly any other kind of damage, unless a customer purchases AppleCare+ for HomePod.

AppleCare+ extends a HomePod's hardware coverage to two years from its original purchase date, and adds up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage, each subject to a service fee of $39 in the United States, £29 in the United Kingdom, and $55 in Australia, plus the upfront cost of the plan.

If your HomePod requires service, the process can be initiated by contacting Apple Support, booking a Genius Bar appointment at an Apple Store, or visiting an Apple Authorized Service Provider.

Article Link: Apple Will Repair HomePod Power Cables For $29, But Warns They 'Should Not Be Removed'
 

iChrila

macrumors newbie
Oct 7, 2012
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Apple notes the cable can be mailed to one of its repair centers
Do you mean the complete HomePod? If I'm not supposed to remove the cable, why should I remove it and send it to Apple?
But let's be real, this is exactly what they'll do at Apple Repair Centers: Unplug old cord, replug new cord.

This whole power cord thing is ridiculous. It should always have been removable even if it's a custom made cable that's only available at Apple Stores for 59$
 

seeforyourself

macrumors 6502
Dec 1, 2014
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What the heck is the point of this machine? It’s much more expensive than the competitors, and much more inconvenient... What’s next? The performance degrades as the wire ages?

Come on Apple... I was seriously considering on getting it, and now it’s not even worth it to me.
 

recoil80

macrumors 68030
Jul 16, 2014
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Would it have killed Apple to just give the device a goddamn normal power plug?
Yeah... Maybe you already have a power cord long enough for your needs and no, you can't use it and just hope the one they give it to you is long enough. It should be for most users, but you never know...
 

I7guy

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Nov 30, 2013
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What the heck is the point of this machine? It’s much more expensive than the competitors, and much more inconvenient... What’s next? The performance degrades as the wire ages?

Come on Apple... I was seriously considering on getting it, and now it’s not even worth it to me.
Because the cable is non-removeable?
 

Relentless Power

macrumors Penryn
Jul 12, 2016
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What the heck is the point of this machine?
Not sure why you’re even asking this question. However, obviously it’s intended to deliver a home audio experience first AND act as a smart speaker.

It’s much more expensive than the competitors, and much more inconvenient...
It’s Much more expensive than the competitors, but it’s also offering a much better listening experience. Not sure how it’s any less convenient then the other smart speakers, considering they literally do all the same thing.
 

and 1989 others

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Sep 21, 2016
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Apart from my vacuum cleaner I genuinely cannot think of any other electrical item that doesn't have a detachable power lead. It just makes sense to detach them.

Certainly it makes sense that if they have the 'ability' to be detached it doesn't destroy the internals of the device.
 
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mingravity

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Sep 5, 2013
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Would it have killed Apple to just give the device a goddamn normal power plug?
I think their design team is tasked at not just selling homepods but peripherals as well so 1 unit sold kinda becomes a recuring money making machine for apple.
OR they are straight stupids who have no idea how/why they are doing what they are doing
 

tardegrade

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Jan 14, 2009
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So what's the reason behind making the cable non-user friendly to detach? What's the benefit to the Homepod? Is there any electrical compliance reason? Because the benefits of being able to easily switch to a longer or shorter cable as needs be, is significant and standard for many items of this type.
 
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Rogifan

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I have an LG sound bar with separate subwoofer and neither have a detachable power cord. Maybe it has something to do with the device needing consistent power and a non removable cord providing it better?
 

Zoboomafoo

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Apart from my vacuum cleaner I genuinely cannot think of any other electrical item that doesn't have a detachable power lead. It just makes sense to detach them.

Certainly it makes sense that if they have the 'ability' to be detached it doesn't destroy the internals of the device.
Most of my kitchen appliances and lamps are permawired.

What is the value in it being detachable? Seems like it’s help for packaging. Obviously cord replacement if damaged. Anything else?
[doublepost=1518438351][/doublepost]
I have an LG sound bar with separate subwoofer and neither have a detachable power cord. Maybe it has something to do with the device needing consistent power and a non removable cord providing it better?
I wonder if it has certain power requirements too? Lord knows I probably haven’t used the “right” charger for any of my Mac/iDevices in ten years
 

and 1989 others

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Sep 21, 2016
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What is the value in it being detachable? Seems like it’s help for packaging. Obviously cord replacement if damaged. Anything else?
If you live in the U.K. the plug is larger than in the Us. Some people like to thread the thin end through their furniture desk area, tv stands to make the cables tidy. Not having it detachable will make this difficult.
 

RecentlyConverted

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Oct 21, 2015
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So what's the reason behind making the cable non-user friendly to detach? What's the benefit to the Homepod? Is there any electrical compliance reason? Because the benefits of being able to easily switch to a longer or shorter cable as needs be, is significant and standard for many items of this type.
It’s to enhance the user experience
 
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tardegrade

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Jan 14, 2009
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I have an LG sound bar with separate subwoofer and neither have a detachable power cord. Maybe it has something to do with the device needing consistent power and a non removable cord providing it better?
Yeah my Marshall amp is hard wired and obviously kitchen appliances are but they're higher voltage. I'd understand if yanking the cable risked damage to the internal components to a greater degree than it does to any other appliance. I'm hoping an "Audiophile Electrician" has the answer.
 
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