AppleCare Technician Training

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by LePigeonBleu, Jun 21, 2012.

  1. LePigeonBleu macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Location:
    San Diego
    #1
    hi there.

    i'm interested in becoming an apple certified macintosh technician, and am thinking about purchasing the applecare technician training at the student price of $239.

    does anyone have thoughts, experience, or even have the certification?

    what's the training like if i do it online?

    any additional information i may have not asked about would be helpful as well.

    thanks,

    m
     
  2. sim667 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    #2
    Is it the ACSP course?

    I did that and learnt so much about the OS it was ridiculous. The intention was for me to get a apple tech job, but not with apple, which I still havent done so haven't bother renewing it, but a lot of what I learnt on snow leopard still applies to lion.

    I want to do the hardware course aswell.

    The book they use for that is published by peachpit, Apple support essentials I think its called.
     
  3. ijoetech macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2012
    #3
    AppleCare Technician Training

    hi there.

    i'm interested in becoming an apple certified macintosh technician, and am thinking about purchasing the applecare technician training at the student price of $239.

    does anyone have thoughts, experience, or even have the certification?

    what's the training like if i do it online?

    any additional information i may have not asked about would be helpful as well.

    thanks,

    m



    Hi, He's talking about the Apple Certified Macintosh Technician Training, not the Apple Certified Support Professional. Both are similar, but have two different purposes. ACSP's are more like help desk professionals, and those that want to learn the OS more. The ACMT is more for those individuals that want to learn the Mac Hardware a little better, and would like to be a genius at an Apple Store or work in education servicing Mac Hardware as a Self-Servicing Account. I did this 2 years ago, and re-certified using the same training on the newest hardware. The training itself is very intuitive, showing you things like how to prevent ESD damage,Mac networking,and some things to expect to see when working on Macs and also covers the entire Mac line going back to the eMacs all the way to the latest MacBook Airs. The XServe and MacPro are also covered. I did not, however pay for the training, the school district that I work at became a self-serviciing account, which then afforded us the opportunity to access the training for free.
    So to answer your question I do have the certification, as well as ACSP 10.6 and 10.7, ACTC 10.6 and 10.7, ACMT, ACA 10.6.

    The test consists of 2 tests, one on the Mac Hardware, and the other on the Mac OS. The hardware portion contains an area that must be passed, regarding safety. I took it at a Prometric Testing site. hope that helps and good luck!
     
  4. guzhogi macrumors 68030

    guzhogi

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Location:
    Wherever my feet take me…
    #4
    I want to get the ACMT certification. May I ask, how did you study? I already bought the $239 training thing from Apple, but can't understand where I get the training materials. Thanks!
     
  5. sim667 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    #5


    Ah the ACMT is what Im hoping to do next......
     
  6. zewazir macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2012
    #6
    I have had my ACMT for just under 2 years now, and need to recertify. Last year I only had to take the hardware recertification test, but this year I have to take both the hardware test, and the OS test. To you ACMT people: if I were to purchase one of the online ACMT study guides, which are for first-time ACMT test takers, would that prepare me for the OS 10.7 Lion RE-certification test, or are the OS certification test and the OS RE-certification test significantly different?
     
  7. macsrwe macrumors newbie

    macsrwe

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2006
    Location:
    Arizona
    #7
    In my opinion, the program is severely overpriced.

    The AppleCare Technician Training package ($240 street, $299 from Apple), like the AppleCare package itself, contains only one item of value: a slip of paper with a serial number. That number gets you access to Apple's web-based training materials (which are very good) and their online collection of model-specific repair guides (which I find to be the most valuable part of the offering), FOR ONE YEAR.

    You study the training materials until you feel confident, then you spring for the certification tests. For your initial certification, you have to take the tests in person at a Prometric training center; for recertification, you can take them online. The live tests run $150 each; when I certified, three were required. The online tests run $50 each; most years I have recertified, two were required. Recertification is required EVERY YEAR.

    To sum up, your first year's certification will cost you $690, and subsequent years will run $340. For independent technicians, that's quite a chunk of change.

    And the certification is all you get. (You even have to pester them for the wall certificate they promise to send out automatically -- at least that's been my experience for the past three years.)

    You used to get copies of Apple Hardware Test for all current machines -- not any more. You don't get access to Apple repair parts (hello, eBay). You don't get phone consultations for knotty problems. And despite the AppleCare in the title, you don't get authorization to perform warranty work -- that is, you can perform all the warranty work you like, but no one will reimburse you for it. If you want all these things, you have to become an Apple Authorized Service Provider. And, according to a notice I just discovered at their website, Apple is no longer "accepting reseller or service provider applications in the United States." Somehow, I'm not surprised.

    And due to recent Apple product directions, the repair business is drying up, at least for the non-urban independent technician. Used to be you could economically replace an LCD panel for a customer who dropped his laptop -- now, the only "Apple-approved" repair method is to replace the whole upper half of the laptop, making a whole new machine significantly more attractive instead. And the recent Retina MacBook Pro, with its soldered-in memory and irreplaceable battery, suggests that Apple may be pushing the "replace, don't repair" paradigm even harder in the future.

    Sorry to sound like such a downer, but that's been my experience.
     

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