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Apple's Clips video editing app received a small update this afternoon, introducing new artwork ahead of Chinese New Year on February 16.

Today's update brings a new Apple-designed label and poster for Chinese New Year. The poster, which reads "Gung Hay Fat Choy" (the equivalent to Happy New Year in Cantonese) is accompanied by fireworks and can be used as an interstitial scene in a video composition, while the label, which says the same thing, can be used as a sticker.

clipschinesenewyear.jpg

According to Apple's release notes, the update also improves stability when browsing and recording Selfie Scenes on the iPhone X and it addresses an issue that caused the Top Secret poster to animate incorrectly during playback.

Today's minor Clips update follows a significant overhaul of the app that was introduced in November. That update added "Selfie Scenes," a feature that's designed to use the front-facing TrueDepth camera on the iPhone X to immerse users in 360-degree animated landscapes.


The new poster and label is available on all devices, but Selfie Scenes are limited to the iPhone X. Clips can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Article Link: Apple's Clips App Updated With Chinese New Year Graphics
 

zhang96

macrumors member
Jul 29, 2016
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Ottawa
“Gung Hay Fat Choy” is not “Happy New Year”, it means “Congrats and Gain Fortune”, people normally use this as a New Year‘s greeting.
 
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jclo

Editor
Staff member
Dec 7, 2012
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“Gung Hay Fat Choy” is not “Happy New Year”, it means “Congrats and Gain Fortune”, people normally use this as a New Year‘s greeting.

Yep. Just said the equivalent to Happy New Year because that's how it's used.
 
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M2M

macrumors 6502
Jan 12, 2009
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All 3 global clips users appreciate. If they speak Cantonese. Mandarin speakers (Taiwan, mainland china) don’t care.
 
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jaychow

macrumors newbie
Mar 23, 2017
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“Gung Hay Fat Choy” is not “Happy New Year”, it means “Congrats and Gain Fortune”, people normally use this as a New Year‘s greeting.

For those who are curious, here are the Traditional Chinese* characters: 恭喜發財
* Majority of Cantonese-speaking Chinese use TC, as opposed to Simplified Chinese: 恭喜发财
 

alphaod

macrumors Core
Feb 9, 2008
22,182
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NYC
For those who are curious, here are the Traditional Chinese* characters: 恭喜發財
* Majority of Cantonese-speaking Chinese use TC, as opposed to Simplified Chinese: 恭喜发财

Unfortunately the majority of Chinese do not use TC.
 

szw-mapple fan

macrumors 68030
Jul 28, 2012
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For those who are curious, here are the Traditional Chinese* characters: 恭喜發財
* Majority of Cantonese-speaking Chinese use TC, as opposed to Simplified Chinese: 恭喜发财

False. The majority of Cantonese-speaking Chinese live on the mainland, where simplified Chinese is the default.
 
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