Apple's credit card madness.

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by woodhouse, Feb 4, 2014.

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  1. woodhouse, Feb 4, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2014

    woodhouse macrumors newbie

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    #1
    Update: the reps worked hard to sort it out and it appears my order is back to its place in the queue.
     
  2. firedept macrumors 603

    firedept

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    #2
    Maybe try calling Apple directly to explain the situation. Could not hurt and possibly see you put back in place.
     
  3. Jaben3421 macrumors regular

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    Sep 18, 2011
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    CA
    #3
    Apple doesn't charge your card until the order ships, so it's not really their fault. It didn't matter what the state of the card was when you placed the order, since it warned you that it wouldn't bill until the machine shipped. I don't see how Apple has started to slide into the gutter for your failure to realize your card would expire by the time the machine shipped.
     
  4. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68020

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    #4
    I agree that Apple can't control the credit card issue - if one had more than one credit card, and one had the foresight, one could use a card that would not expire in the interim (though typing in the expiration date is a clue). Credit card rules and consumer law generally prohibit charging for goods until they are ready to ship. It's really for the good, in the big picture.

    However, this is an issue that some smart programming on Apple's part could greatly alleviate. They could add an error trap on the card expiration date - if it expires prior to the projected ship date, then do the following... I can't say what "the following" might be, since it'd be a policy issue; anything from refusing to take the order to kicking in a process that sends out reminder emails and gives the customer a grace period for updating the card info prior to losing their place in queue.
     
  5. deconstruct60 macrumors 604

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    Mar 10, 2009
    #5
    It is the users responsibility to use their own card. If have used the card and the charge hasn't shown up before you activate the new card... the user should already know there is a problem. Charged Mac Pro and completely forgot about it??

    Frankly it is much easier to clean up if user just calls up Apple while in the "still processing" status and says... "Oh my card updated to new expiration date". The hiccup here is probably more so deeply rooted in that the attempt to do a charge failed than in needed to change the account information of what to charge to.

    Apple could babysit folks but it is highly likely not worth the time and money to chase after user responsibilities. For the vast majority of stuff they sell, expired cards are not an issue. Why should they be doing daily scans of everything in their queue? If a users card is lost or stolen... it still would be a user's responsibility to call in and update the info of what account should be charged. An expired card is not particularly any different in that respect. The user got the card in the mail. "Ding dong" ... a clue make want to tell Apple about that if Apple gave you a Feb (or end of Jan) date for shipping. Apple has told the user about when they are going to charge the card.
     
  6. analog guy macrumors 6502

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    Mar 6, 2009
    #6
    unfortunately, this thread has proven that a traditional notion of a queue may not apply (or is much more complex than we imagine).
     
  7. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68020

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    #7
    I don't think it's a matter of how one feels about personal responsibility. Perhaps people should pay a price for their lack of foresight. On the other hand, error-trapping at the point of purchase is just good business. The more trouble you head-off at the pass, the lower your customer support costs are, and the higher your customer satisfaction ratings become. There's already a ton of error-trapping done when processing a transaction. Adding one more isn't going to be a huge burden on their servers. They fetch one variable (delivery date). If Delivery Date is > Card Expiration Date, branch to the exception routine, if not, continue processing as usual.

    Now, maybe Apple's cost of remediation on this particular product roll-out doesn't justify the cost of modifying the shopping cart system, but long term, I can't see how it wouldn't pay off.
     
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