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Apr 12, 2001
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Earlier tonight, KTLA 5's The Tech Report aired a segment (via AppleInsider) centering around Apple Pay, which featured Apple's SVP of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue using the mobile payments solution around Santa Monica. The segment, which can be viewed here, followed Cue and reporter Rich Demuro as the Apple executive utilized his iPhone 6 Plus and Apple Pay to purchase a meal at Panera Bread, sunglasses at Bloomingdale's, and merchandise from the Disney Store.

applepaycue2-800x443.jpg
For their meal at Panera Bread, Cue is shown utilizing Apple Pay inside of the restaurant's official app to pre-order food simply and securely. At Bloomingdale's, Cue is shown using Apple Pay and his iPhone at a payment terminal to purchase sunglasses, which he is required to sign for. However, Cue was not required to sign for the two dolls he purchased at the Disney Store with Apple Pay. Cue then notes that users will sometimes be required to sign for more expensive purchases made with Apple Pay in-store.

The pair also visit an Apple Store to discuss Apple Pay on the company's new line of iPads. While users can't make in-store purchases with the iPad, Cue points out that users can still make in-app purchases with Apple Pay and Touch ID on the tablet.

Cue also spoke on the security of Apple Pay and how tokenization helps keeps credit card numbers away from malicious users:
You've seen these hacks that are happening in the systems where thousands of credit cards are getting exposed, and so you have try to protect that number. Well, with Apple Pay, the number that's being given to the terminal is a one-time number that's created for that transaction.
A report from The New York Times over the weekend shed some light on Apple Pay's early successes, noting that the service doubled mobile wallet transactions at Walgreens and accounted for 50% of tap-to-pay purchases at McDonalds. Whole Foods shared earlier this month that it processed 150,000 Apple Pay transactions between October 20 and November 6, and the service has increased consumer interest in the mobile payment area in general. Apple currently has 36 retail partners that accept Apple Pay in their stores as the service is available at more than 200,000 retail locations.

Article Link: Apple's Eddy Cue Shows Off Apple Pay at Panera Bread, Bloomingdale's, and Disney Store in News Segment
 

wesk702

macrumors 68000
Jul 7, 2007
1,809
368
The hood
I really hope this takes off big and becomes mainstream. It's just too easy to use and I actually enjoy spending my digital cash.










And AAPL....
 

Dave532

macrumors member
Feb 19, 2014
47
0
Having to sometimes sign seems a bit crazy and not how NFC works in the rest of the world (although you may be asked to enter a PIN on random occasions when using a contactless credit card because the credit card has no other way of authenticating).

But what can signing a receipt gain you when using Apple Pay, they don't have a signature to compare to (unless you have to sign the back of your phone :p).

Hopefully this will just be a temporary glitch.
 

Jsameds

Suspended
Apr 22, 2008
3,525
7,986
I have noticed quite a lot of misinformation about Apple Pay and Google Wallet floating around other forums and sites. The trouble is AP is so similar to use compared to other NFC services that the average Joe thinks they are the same, when in reality they are worlds apart in terms of security and secrecy.

Clarifying the differences between the services is key to AP's success.
 

tigertazz

macrumors 6502
May 4, 2009
297
356
Glad it's so easy just wish it could be used in the UK where we already use contactless payments in loads of stores
 

brownpaw

macrumors regular
Apr 18, 2010
159
128
Loving ApplePay

As an American in Australia (with American bank accounts, and no-international-fee credit cards), I'm loving ApplePay. It works just fine with PayWave/PayPass, which are basically ubiquitous contactless payment solutions here. I use it all the time with no issues here.
 

alksion

macrumors 68000
Sep 10, 2010
1,711
111
Orange County CA
I live in LA and always watch the KTLA morning show. I was very surprised to see Eddy Cue on there, but ultimately, I am just happy to see the interest in this new payment method from the media.
 

lincolntran

macrumors 6502a
Jan 18, 2010
843
471
Having to sometimes sign seems a bit crazy and not how NFC works in the rest of the world (although you may be asked to enter a PIN on random occasions when using a contactless credit card because the credit card has no other way of authenticating).

But what can signing a receipt gain you when using Apple Pay, they don't have a signature to compare to (unless you have to sign the back of your phone :p).

Hopefully this will just be a temporary glitch.

Sometimes you're asked to sign on "big amount". I don't think it's for verification. I think it's fire the bank to have a confirmation that you spend a big amount and on purpose.
 

sshambles

macrumors 6502a
Oct 19, 2005
740
1,071
Australia
As an American in Australia (with American bank accounts, and no-international-fee credit cards), I'm loving ApplePay. It works just fine with PayWave/PayPass, which are basically ubiquitous contactless payment solutions here. I use it all the time with no issues here.

Nice. Considering almost no one in Australia takes AMEX, good to hear you're beating the 'system' against American cards.

Australia has a $100 limit. Requires a pin for anything above that - I think ApplePay needs to beat that, because seriously - a fingerprint is more secure than a 4-digit pin.
 

randyj

macrumors regular
Aug 23, 2004
174
267
In Australia we have those NFC machines at 95% of vendors and it works for anything under $100. I just wave my wallet over and that is it.
I do see the value in Apple pay with not having to carry your wallet and not having to replace your cards if you lose the phone, however it probably won't have a massive impact here like it is having over there.
 

BMcCoy

macrumors 68000
Jun 24, 2010
1,688
3,366
Sometimes you're asked to sign on "big amount". I don't think it's for verification. I think it's fire the bank to have a confirmation that you spend a big amount and on purpose.

Indeed.
But what is a signature? How does writing your name down in any way prove that it was you that wrote it?!
This is a simple flaw in the signature philosophy, that permeates into every legal or financial document we sign.
It is entirely a representation of trust and proceedings, but cant be defended.

Biometrics are the future, and Apple Pay is on that path, thanks to the TouchID fingerprint.
 

brownpaw

macrumors regular
Apr 18, 2010
159
128
Nice. Considering almost no one in Australia takes AMEX, good to hear you're beating the 'system' against American cards.

Australia has a $100 limit. Requires a pin for anything above that - I think ApplePay needs to beat that, because seriously - a fingerprint is more secure than a 4-digit pin.

Granted, I haven't tried it on any big purchases (>$100) yet. :p
 

Rogifan

macrumors Core
Nov 14, 2011
22,833
28,904
Can you use iPhone apps on the iPad to use Pay? I don't think the Target iPad app has been updated yet to support it.
 

FieldingMellish

Suspended
Jun 20, 2010
2,440
3,108
Despite owning an iPhone, I'll dig into my pockets and come up with a fistful of change and crumpled dollar bills of various denominations and start sorting it out at the point of sale. We as a society need to slow down a little.
 

Piggie

macrumors G3
Feb 23, 2010
8,738
3,304
There still seems to be something fundamentally wrong to have to use a $500 - $1000 Dollar device to buy a coffee and a sandwich.

Plastic cards are cheap and throwaway, universal for everyone.

Whilst this is technically impressive you can do it.

Fundamentally I still don't feel, long term this is the ideal payment solution for the masses for all things. It feels more like a short term, very limited gimmick that's never going to be total mass scale cash/card replacement.

We want something linked to you as a person, cheap so everyone has it.
Ideally non traceable and no fee's taken.

I want to go to a flea market (car boot sale in UK) and buy that photo frame for a few cents someone is throwing away, and just give them payment.

At the moment, you use cash as that's what everyone understands and has.

It really needs to get down to cash level, before this will be totally mainstream. Personal transactions between people.
No middle man taking a cut, no middle man doing anything.

I'm joking, but to make my point:

You need to be able to buy Illegal guns, drugs, Pay someone to take someone out, etc, etc, etc, with something, and I'd assume if you do anything like the things above, you deal in cash, as you are transferring a physical item between individuals.

I look forward to a future where Something high tech will replace cash down to it's base level, but, whilst clever I don't think this tech, whilst looking cool, is it.

People throw cents and dollars into a Street Performers hat as they entertain passing public. The the artist going to have a NFC Terminal and hope people with iPhones will stop and pay?
No, as you often just throw some lose change physical coins/notes into their hat on the ground.
 

iapplelove

Suspended
Nov 22, 2011
5,324
7,629
East Coast USA
Very seamless, Apple did good job with AP.

I totally agree. But I had no idea about the obstacles thr MCX group aka CurrentC system put on using it. Now it's challenging finding apple pay places at times.

----------

Despite owning an iPhone, I'll dig into my pockets and come up with a fistful of change and crumpled dollar bills of various denominations and start sorting it out at the point of sale. We as a society need to slow down a little.

lol you're a dying breed
 

Kaboominator

macrumors newbie
Nov 18, 2014
1
0
The last two times I went to Panera Bread I ended up at "non Apple Pay" registers because they didn't convert them all.

The first time was an inconvenience. The second time I actually didn't have my wallet on me and they were forced to switch registers.

It really only works if stores are consistent and convert every register.
 

doelcm82

macrumors 68040
Feb 11, 2012
3,578
2,543
Florida, USA
I love shopping at the Bloomingdale's and Disney Store. It's my favorite store!
 
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Boatboy24

macrumors 65816
Nov 4, 2011
1,064
1,156
1 Infinite Loop
I'm loving Apple Pay so far and find myself a little disappointed when I'm in a store that can't accept NFC payments. One minor annoyance so far is that when using my debit card (which I tend to use for most purchases), I still have to enter my PIN in the terminal, despite the thumbprint authentication. Maybe I just haven't found the way around that yet, but it is a little annoying.
 

samcraig

macrumors P6
Jun 22, 2009
16,638
41,619
USA
Cue also spoke on the security of Apple Pay and how tokenization helps keeps credit card numbers away from malicious users: A report from The New York Times over the weekend shed some light on Apple Pay's early successes, noting that the service doubled mobile wallet transactions at Walgreens and accounted for 50% of tap-to-pay purchases at McDonalds. Whole Foods shared earlier this month that it processed 150,000 Apple Pay transactions between October 20 and November 6, and the service has increased consumer interest in the mobile payment area in general. Apple currently has 36 retail partners that accept Apple Pay in their stores as the service is available at more than 200,000 retail locations.

The "problem" with the first part of this statement in the article is that it's relatively meaningless. Apple Pay doubles mobile wallet transactions at walgreens. Where's the baseline. That could mean from 5 transactions to 10 or 100,000 to 200,000. Same thing with McDonalds. It accounted for 50% of the tap and pay. What's the baseline?
 

iapplelove

Suspended
Nov 22, 2011
5,324
7,629
East Coast USA
I'm loving Apple Pay so far and find myself a little disappointed when I'm in a store that can't accept NFC payments. One minor annoyance so far is that when using my debit card (which I tend to use for most purchases), I still have to enter my PIN in the terminal, despite the thumbprint authentication. Maybe I just haven't found the way around that yet, but it is a little annoying.

I only use my debt card and I think it may be merchant specific that requires the pin.

When CVS first was accepting apple pay it never asked for a pin. Macy's doesn't require a pin either. But I have used it at other places that have required one . Amount seems to be irrelevant.
 

philipk

macrumors 6502
Jun 11, 2008
438
190
Clarifying the differences between the services is key to AP's success.

Not really.

For Apple Pay to succeed we need all the NFC services to succeed.

Yes, AP is more secure than the others so I will use it. However, I don't want to push that idea as we need EVERY NFC service to gain merchants.
 
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