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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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144322-ipad_battery_hours.jpg


Several MacRumors readers have noticed that Apple has posted information on its iPad Battery Replacement Service, which allows users to receive a replacement should their device's battery no longer hold a charge. The service will cost $99 plus an additional $6.95 shipping and applicable taxes.

"iPad Battery Replacement Service" is a bit of a misnomer, however, as instead of swapping a new battery into a customer's existing iPad, Apple will simply send the customer a new iPad.
You will receive a replacement iPad that will not contain any of your personal data. Before you submit your iPad for service, it is important to sync your iPad with iTunes to back up your contacts, calendars, email account settings, bookmarks, apps, etc. Apple is not responsible for the loss of information when servicing your iPad.
The device exchange is estimated by Apple to require approximately one week to complete and may be arranged through Apple's retail stores, Apple technical support, or Apple Authorized Service Providers.

Devices that have been damaged or had unauthorized service or modifications performed on them will not be eligible for the program.

Article Link: Apple's iPad Battery Replacement Program Forgoes New Battery, Replaces iPad
 

ChazUK

macrumors 603
Feb 3, 2008
5,390
24
Essex (UK)
I wonder what they class as "damage"? What if you looked after your iPad and got a scuffed up refurb as a replacement?

I'm sure some people would rather just wait for a battery swap.
 

rumpus

macrumors member
Mar 4, 2010
58
0
This would be nice if after one year they replace your old iPad with a new model !
 

Elzlaik

macrumors regular
Nov 1, 2008
134
0
I highly doubt Apple will return a customer a scuffed up refurb. They may well use refurbs, but they will be cosmetically perfect. Apple has a high customer service rating for a reason.
 

pubwvj

macrumors 68000
Oct 1, 2004
1,895
200
Mountains of Vermont
This is only for out of warrantee. Math: $105.95 divided into $499 => failure has to happen within 4.7 years. That is longer than the $99 battery warrantee. In other words, it ain't worth it folks. Add in the % probability >0 of refusal due to some "customer abuse" and it gets even worse.

Based on standard math for warrantees I come up with the cost to consumers should be $49 to be worth it. That should include standard shipping.

The fact that you'll be without the device for a week is a further reduction in value of the warrantee. Apple once kept my PowerBook for a very extended period. In fact, they thought they had lost it. Most annoying.

I'll pass on this warrantee. Statistically it is better to just get an extra iPad. :)
 

rstansby

macrumors 6502
Jun 19, 2007
493
0
It would be nice if Apple offered an option to send you the replacement before you send in the iPad with a weak battery. That way you wouldn't be without your iPad for a week.
 

mrubin7

macrumors newbie
Mar 13, 2010
2
0
I don't see why this is surprising to anyone. It's the EXACT same policy they've had with the iPod for years. You pay a fee, you get back a refurbished iPad with a brand new battery and brand new shell. It's always been a good deal and it will continue to be so. When technology is that small and thin, it is not designed to be easily taken apart to replace individual components.
 

daveschroeder

macrumors 6502
Sep 14, 2003
314
12
Madison, WI
This is EXACTLY how all iPods and iPhones have been done for years.

And for those wondering, the replacement unit you get is either:

1. New, or

2. "Refurbished" (all internal components factory-tested and/or replaced, with a completely physically new external enclosure, making the unit visually indistinguishable from a new unit).

In all cases, the unit has a 90-day service warranty, and will be the exact same model that was submitted for repair.

For those still having difficulties with this, simply imagine that the replacement battery was $99. For those with data privacy concerns, please simply sync and erase your iPad/iPod/iPhone before service. For those who ask "how do I sync an iPad with a dead battery?!?!?"...uh, first of all, by plugging it in; second, how would this be any different than if the battery were user-replaceable?

There, that should about cover the objections. ;)
 

Dafrety

macrumors newbie
Dec 6, 2008
5
0
It could only be better if they actually let you swap the battery yourself! Oh wait. I forgot that taking away user options was a feature. :apple:
 

daveschroeder

macrumors 6502
Sep 14, 2003
314
12
Madison, WI
It could only be better if they actually let you swap the battery yourself! Oh wait. I forgot that taking away user options was a feature. :apple:

Eliminating user access mechanisms to a battery (door, internal structures, etc.) is what makes the device as small as it is while still having the battery life that it does.
 

RalfTheDog

macrumors 68000
Feb 23, 2010
1,632
590
Lagrange Point
If I am reading this correctly, it is not insurance. If your battery dies, you ship them the $100 and your old iPad and they send you a referb (Probably with a new shell).

I can picture lots of people wanting a new system, cycling there batteries as fast as they can.
 

rstansby

macrumors 6502
Jun 19, 2007
493
0
This is only for out of warrantee. Math: $105.95 divided into $499 => failure has to happen within 4.7 years. That is longer than the $99 battery warrantee. In other words, it ain't worth it folks. Add in the % probability >0 of refusal due to some "customer abuse" and it gets even worse.

Based on standard math for warrantees I come up with the cost to consumers should be $49 to be worth it. That should include standard shipping.

The fact that you'll be without the device for a week is a further reduction in value of the warrantee. Apple once kept my PowerBook for a very extended period. In fact, they thought they had lost it. Most annoying.

I'll pass on this warrantee. Statistically it is better to just get an extra iPad. :)

For one thing you are assuming that there is only a $499 model, you have ignored the higher priced models.
For another thing this isn't a warranty that you pay for in case your battery dies. This is a repair fee that you will only pay if your battery dies.

So if your battery dies you have 2 choices. $99 for a replacement, or $500+ for a new iPad. The choice is simple.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
5,503
89
An Island in the Salish Sea
Its almost a rental program. If you use your iPad heavily (but take care of it) for $99 shot you get a new one.

I would have to assume that if 6 months down the road Apple discovers the iPad has a design flaw (e.g. one of the components tends to fail prematurely) that Apple will be sending out fixed versions of the iPad for the battery replacement program. The PR of sending out iPads with a part that then fails would be really bad, so I believe my thinking is sound.

If you can manage to deplete your battery just before your Apple Care expires, over and over, I would think you could keep your iPad going for a very long time. You have a working iPad for the 3 years of Apple Care. Get a new one on the battery replacement program at the 3 year mark - and that one should last at least 2 or 3 years since it should be "good as new" and probably better than the one you are replacing.
 

daveschroeder

macrumors 6502
Sep 14, 2003
314
12
Madison, WI
fail. this shows they are expecting problems. not to mention if the battery is dead how the hell am i going to sync it?

Uh, what?

"Expecting problems?"

You mean, expecting that a battery known to have a finite lifetime will eventually need to be replaced? In the same way that Apple has done for battery replacement programs for the millions of iPods and iPhones sold?

You mean those kinds of "problems"?

And yeah, when the battery is "dead" (aside from the fact it wouldn't be completely dead), just plug it in. The battery doesn't need to have any charge whatsoever to sync it.
 

daveschroeder

macrumors 6502
Sep 14, 2003
314
12
Madison, WI
if it cant hold a charge how would it turn on? or will it be simply only work if plugged in?

It would turn on without any charge in the battery at all. In fact, iPods and iPhones will turn on on USB or external power even if the battery is not present at all.

(Also, do you think you're going to go from working perfectly fine to the battery holding zero charge? And where have you been for the last several years? This is EXACTLY how battery replacement is handled on all iPod and iPhone models.)
 
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