Apple's Mac App Notarization Service Experiencing Slowness Following Release of macOS Catalina

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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In June, Apple announced that all Developer ID-signed software distributed outside the Mac App Store must be submitted for notarization by Apple in order to run by default on macOS Catalina.


Following the release of macOS Catalina this week, however, some developers have found the notarization process to be very slow. Apple's system status page reflects this, noting that some users may be experiencing performance issues with its Developer ID notary service since Wednesday afternoon.

Apple says it is working to resolve the problem, but in the meantime, some developers have turned to Twitter to voice their frustration:
It took Apple's servers 10 hours to notarize my app for macOS Catalina. 🧐Hoping this delay is temporary--a few months ago it only took a hour. - John Balestrieri (@johnbalestrieri) October 10, 2019
mood: angry. @Apple requires apps notarization for macOS Catalina but their servers can't keep up with all submitted files and you have to wait for hours for successful notarization. What a shame. - Vladislav Rassokhin (@Vlad_P53) October 10, 2019
I think Apple's notarization server may have died under the Catalina induced load. I submitted a dmg 4+ hours ago. Still "in progress". - ross tulloch (@RossTulloch) October 10, 2019
Ok, so now that everybody is notarizing their apps at the same time.. it's painfully slow. Who would have thought that Apple would build a required feature that does not scale? - Frank Reiff (@frankreiff) October 10, 2019
Developers can submit their apps for notarization by Apple's automated system using Xcode 10 or later.

Article Link: Apple's Mac App Notarization Service Experiencing Slowness Following Release of macOS Catalina
 

rcforkat

macrumors newbie
Sep 30, 2019
11
3
Regardless, I just like dark mode on both MacBook and iPhone. I wish I could have it on all my devices.
 

bkaus

macrumors regular
Sep 26, 2014
186
244
Not when it takes 10 hours. Development software is often on a daily release cycle (see Chrome and WebKit).
But doesn’t one wait until it’s at a mikestone to share to bother with the notarizing? Not needed for local development and testing?
 

konqerror

macrumors 6502a
Dec 31, 2013
799
1,469
But doesn’t one wait until it’s at a mikestone to share to bother with the notarizing? Not needed for local development and testing?
Nightly builds are distributed, see Chrome and WebKit again. And even if you didn't, it is usually a good idea, with at least a developer identity. Developer machines are highly sensitive for malware: not only can source code be stolen, they have been attacked to include backdoors in shipping code.

 

pika2000

macrumors 603
Jun 22, 2007
5,391
4,626
i hope apple goes back to releasing macOS every two years in the future, instead of every year!
Yeah, it’s something they started themselves (I remember how Jobs was so proud of their yearly release cycle), and now they are spread too thin. Even ios 13 has features that will “come later.”

Maybe Apple should do an S cycle on their OSes, so they can actually focus in optimization and ironing out bugs instead of being chased by marketing to prop out new features every year.