Apple's "Post-PC" World

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by *LTD*, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. *LTD* macrumors G4

    *LTD*

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #1
    Daringfireball's John Gruber quoting Josh Topolsky from here:

    http://www.engadget.com/2011/03/03/editorial-its-apples-post-pc-world-were-all-just-living/

    Some highlights:

    This week, Apple stepped into the "post-PC" era of computing -- and there's no looking back, at least not for the folks in Cupertino.

    By joining the company's ongoing vision of a "different" kind of computing with a soundbite friendly piece of marketing-speak, Apple has changed the rules of the game, and made the competition's efforts not just an uphill battle, but -- at least in the eyes of Steve Jobs and co. -- essentially moot. But what exactly is the "post-PC" world? And why is it significant? Let me explain.

    In this new world, Apple no longer has to compete on specs and features, nor does it want to. There is no Mac vs. PC here -- only "the future" versus "the past." It won't be a debate about displays, memory, wireless options -- it will be a debate about the quality of the experience. Apple is not just eschewing the spec conversation in favor of a different conversation -- it's rendering those former conversations useless. It would be like trying to compare a race car to a deeply satisfying book. In a post-PC world, the experience of the product is central and significant above all else. It's not the RAM or CPU speed, screen resolution or number of ports which dictate whether a product is valuable; it becomes purely about the experience of using the device. What that means is that while Motorola and Verizon will spend millions of dollars advertising the Xoom's 4G upgrade options, CPU speed, and high-resolution cameras, Apple need only delight consumers and tell them that specs and and speed are the domain of a dinosaur called the PC. Apple isn't claiming victory in the Space Race -- it's ceding space to the competition.

    But guess who gets Earth all to itself? Apple's not saying that it beats other tablets on the market. It's saying "we do one thing, and these guys do something else altogether." They're not competition -- they're not even playing the same game!

    That's not to say Apple has given up on PCs, and in fact, the company's laptop sales are consistently exceeding expectations. But take a look at what's creeping around the corner. There's Lion, with its iOS-like interface, its simplified experience. If Apple has its way, and if the sales of its mobile devices carry on in the manner they have up until now, a post-PC outlook will even fit devices that look alarmingly like... PCs.

    But right now -- in the tablet space at least -- the problem for Motorola, Samsung, HP, RIM, and anyone else who is challenging Apple becomes infinitely more difficult. Almost any company could put together a more powerful or spec-heavy tablet, but all the horsepower in the world can't help you if you don't find a way to delight the average consumer. Those other tablet makers may have superior hardware (and in the case of the Xoom, some superior software as well), but without that key component of sheer delight, the road for them is long and hard. HP is getting close by touting features like Touch-to-Share, but against experiences like the new GarageBand for iOS and the 65,000 apps (and counting) that currently exist, it's hard to see a clear path to sizable competition. That goes for Google and RIM as well.


    Notice that Topolsky talks about how Apple "delights" the consumer. This is key, and it's characteristic of the way the market is moving - a way in which Apple has moved for years now, but which seems to be something entirely new for the spec/numbers obsessed competition. Apple has indeed changed the entire conversation, and you're either speaking the same language, or . . . you're not Apple - which can be a problem.

    Now on to Gruber's take on Topolsky's comments - which mirrors my own thoughts exactly.

    http://daringfireball.net/

    Apple’s ‘Post-PC’ World ★
    Josh Topolsky:


    It won’t be a debate about displays, memory, wireless options — it will be a debate about the quality of the experience. Apple is not just eschewing the spec conversation in favor of a different conversation — it’s rendering those former conversations useless. It would be like trying to compare a race car to a deeply satisfying book. In a post-PC world, the experience of the product is central and significant above all else. It’s not the RAM or CPU speed, screen resolution or number of ports which dictate whether a product is valuable; it becomes purely about the experience of using the device.


    Gruber:

    The thing is, for some of us, it’s always been this way. That’s why we stuck with the Mac during the stretches where Intel CPUs were faster and cheaper. What the iPad changes is that it takes things even further in this experience-first/specs-second mindset. Spec-wise — CPU speed, RAM, storage, expandability, pixel-count — the iPad pales compared to a MacBook. But experience-wise, it’s better. The iPad is slower, but feels faster.

    Exactly. It's all about synergy between hardware and software. if there is none, then specs don't matter. Numbers are unintelligible. They won't translate into anything. Rather, it's about the User Experience. How to delight the consumer. We're undergoing a paradigm shift. It's probably the most significant shift since the introduction of the home PC. Again, Apple is the one leading us into it. Almost entirely on their own, with everyone else following.

    The nice thing is, for all of us Apple users who were a bit lost and confused and worried in the mid-90's, the ballgame is completely different now. What Apple has always aspired to with the Macintosh has evolved into not only what was always intended but never quite achieved, but into something that was never really expected.
     
  2. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #2
    When you think about it its also true for Apple's computers...
     
  3. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    I'll be staying in the past until tablets are able to do everything my computer can. Even then, I prefer to use a desktop computer.

    So yeah, I'll happily stay in the past for now.
     
  4. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #4
    There are a few things I enjoy with my iMac that just can't be replicated on a tablet.

    I like using a big screen. I like the feel of a physical keyboard over a virtual keyboard. I like using a mouse. And perhaps most importantly, I like being to access my files and software in whatever way I want. Apple's iOS devices don't let you do those things.
     
  5. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #5
    I concur. These are my thoughts precisely.
     
  6. GoKyu macrumors 65816

    GoKyu

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Location:
    New Orleans
    #6
    I definitely still love using my desktop, and it'll be my main computer for a long time to come. I consider it my "permanent local storage" - I have gigs upon gigs of stuff from over the years, and I NEED the hard drive space that the Mac Pro allows for (and Carbonite for online backup.)

    But I don't own a laptop because I'm not mobile enough to need that much power. That's where my iPad comes in - web surfing, checking email, playing a game when I need to kill some time, even doing a quick edit on a photo in Photogene without needing the full power of Photoshop.

    The "Post PC" is great for mobility, but it's nowhere near ready to replace the everyday tasks of desktop computing.
     
  7. G4er? macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Location:
    Temple, TX
    #7
    If I have to do without a desktop computer to partake of Apple's quality of experience then I will simply have to do without Apple.
     
  8. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #8
    Agreed. With my iPad it enhances my work. With my Computer it does my work.

    Apple opted for something different when they introduced the iPad. A different UI that was touch centric. It worked well, as full OS with the mouse/keyboard paradigm was not working for tablets. The thing is, what makes the tablet useful, the UI, also hinders it from being able to have the same level of flexibility and power.

    I have multiple windows open on my mac right now. I have a VMware session running, a remote desktop windows open to a server, spreadsheets and word documents open along with my browser. There's no way I can do that with a tablet.

    I have some remote desktop apps for my iPad and they're horrible if you want to do 8 hours of work on them. There's no way I can do my work on servers with a touchpad. In a pinch yeah I can fix something but not as normal course.
     
  9. Stella, Mar 7, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2011

    Stella macrumors 604

    Stella

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2003
    Location:
    Canada
    #9
    I could not possibly do my work on a tablet, due to performance issues lack of storage, and Apple's walled garden. I need to run applications that Apple do not allow on OIS.

    The era of the tablet is still some way off.. it won't be replacing a PC( at least for me ) for quite some time yet.
     

Share This Page