Approach to programming..

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by robertsawicki, Mar 19, 2015.

  1. robertsawicki macrumors member

    robertsawicki

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    #1
  2. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #2
    Since Apple doesn't certify developers (there is no Apple Certified Developer designation), I would think that certificate would at least be better than nothing. :)
     
  3. PhoneyDeveloper macrumors 68030

    PhoneyDeveloper

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    That certificate is like a 4 year college comp Sci degree (I guess). It seems to be 18 credit hours of CS. I'm not sure what a 4 year college's credit hour requirements would be, but it might be more than that.

    If I was looking to hire a new graduate I would prefer a 4 year college degree to a 2 year college degree. And I would like to see an interesting portfolio of iOS projects that the candidate had worked on.
     
  4. robertsawicki thread starter macrumors member

    robertsawicki

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    I'm just treating this as a start. Whether Apple will hire me to program is a long shot right now. I just want to know the basics. I am close to getting my Associates in Mechatronics Technology. I've always had a feeling to start iOS develeping just for fun. I want to have knowledge in various backgrounds.
     
  5. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    Is that your intention? To be hired to work at Apple? If so, yes, a long shot. A very, very long shot. :)
     
  6. 1458279 Suspended

    1458279

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    I've seen some of the job posts from Apple and I noticed almost all of them require very deep knowledge beyond "iOS programming".

    In other words, if you are a great "app developer", I don't think Apple would be that interested based on their posted jobs. The postings that are more app related require in depth knowledge of an area well beyond what most app developers get into.

    If you're just looking for a job related to iOS, there are TONS of app developer related jobs and probably will be for quite a while.
     
  7. bbeagle macrumors 68040

    bbeagle

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    A 4-year college CS degree is more like 130 credit hours - MUCH MORE than 18 credit hours. 16-18 is normal for 1 semester in college.

    An iOS certificate is nice. It MIGHT give an employer more credence to 'iOS development' on your resume....

    But you'll still be asked iOS questions in your interviews, and knowing those answers by actually understanding iOS and being a good developer, and showing apps FAR OUTWEIGHS a 'certificate'. I'm an iOS developer at my company - and I was hired by answering the development questions WITHOUT having any schooling or certificates in iOS.
     
  8. PhoneyDeveloper macrumors 68030

    PhoneyDeveloper

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    @beagle, That's 130 credit hours total for a BSCS including English, math, science, etc., not 130 hours of CS. But anyway, I'm sure you're right that a BSCS requires more than 18 hours of CS.
     
  9. bbeagle macrumors 68040

    bbeagle

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    Usually it's just above half the total credit hours, so about 70 credit hours of CS-related courses are necessary for a BSCS degree.
     
  10. ackmondual, Apr 7, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2015

    ackmondual macrumors 6502a

    ackmondual

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    #10
    Dunno about Apple's Dev Program. I've taken undergrad CS courses a decade ago, and this seems to be on par given the same time span.

    However, we started off with C, then 2 semesters of C++, then a sem. of Java. I hear these days, newcomers are going right to Java. However, my 1st semester of programming also had a lot of principles too, like efficiency, data structure comparisons, sorting/searches (log n, bubble sort, etc.). Also stuff on how to compile, use Unix, etc. It seems like this curriculum splits that up into 2 semesters?

    I'd agree with this too. However, I wouldn't suggest the OP go out of his way in terms of student loans, debts, other expenses, and time spent just to get a 4-year degree if it'll cause unacceptable levels of hardship. Dunno just how much of a difference makes concerning a 4-year degree vs. a 2-year degree, and whether or not which is the better value for the time and $$.

    Then again, I'm not well versed of the hiring situation this day in age for developers. AFAIK, you definitely want to have a portfolio set up so that HM (hiring managers) and companies can review your work, skills, and knowledge.

    10 years ago, I've known a coworker who did journalism as her undergrad, learn Java (somehow), and get her masters in comp sci. She also got a Sun Certified Java Programmer cert, and definitely learned a lot on that job. Doing pretty well now.
     
  11. iUserz macrumors member

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    Something to keep in mind — you'll get a start from a program like that, but actually learning to program and master the various engineering and computer science disciplines will probably take a lifetime to master.

    Not to mention strategy, design, sales, etc. :eek:

    If you're serious about getting into programming, this writeup might help you understand what you're getting into: http://norvig.com/21-days.html
     
  12. 1458279 Suspended

    1458279

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    #12
    Great points, one thing that the "app gold rush" has done is draw in a bunch of people not looking to learn computer programming, but only looking to "write an app".

    I've seen this back in the DotCom days where everyone wanted to make a web page or client server system without having a clue as to what's really involved in the process.

    Not everyone is cut out to be a programmer. In college, I knew many students that cheated their way thru thinking they only need a paper and that would get them the job they wanted.

    I helped a friend that had the same degree I have, he couldn't walk thru a database table and extract records. I had to write the program for him, yet he was able to keep his government job.

    Too many people jumping into something looking for the easiest way to make a career or quick cash. This happens with any rapidly growing industry.
     
  13. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

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    #13
    Battery Status got me a cold call interview with Apple. Didn't take all that much effort.
     
  14. robertsawicki thread starter macrumors member

    robertsawicki

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    #14
    Thank you for all the informative responses. If anyone has more to add, feel free!
     

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