[APS-C] Beach & Surf Photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Dick Whitman, Oct 26, 2014.

  1. Dick Whitman macrumors 6502

    Dick Whitman

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    #1
    I used to think of beach photography as something very cliche but in the time of owning my Nikon D5300, I've quickly realized that the interplay of light, shadow, and water can make for some spectacular images. Recently, I visited the Eastern Shore and am eager to return to try new things with my camera. I want to try shooting on Shutter Priority mode for one and better "freezing" waves. There was some blurring in the initial shots I attempted to capture.

    Below are some images I shot a few weeks ago. I used VSCO Cam to make some minor edits but would like to start relying more on Lightroom. The last two images were shot with my iPhone 6. I realize there is some vignetting in one of the images, but I don't think it really hurts anything. The waves in the picture with the surfer appear to be somewhat overblown so I am trying to remember to reduce my expose settings by -0.3 EV, which I think is recommended for Nikon DX cameras anyway.

    I plan on ordering the Nikon 50mm f/1.8g for low-light photography and as my first prime lens. Is it worth picking up this lens used vs. new? I also thought about the Nikon 10.5mm f/2.8g (fisheye) vs. a GoPro Hero 4, as the former would yield better IQ. But the GoPro would actually let me take shots in the water. Thoughts?

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    I really like the D5300, but I can see additional buttons being beneficial in making adjustments on the fly rather than having to navigate through menus to do so. But I also like the articulating display and built-in WiFi of the D5300, which more capable cameras in the APS-C arena, like the D7100, don't offer. For those reasons, I'll probably upgrade to the D7200/9300 at some point in the future. The D750 presents the best of both worlds but now that I've begun to assemble a small DX lens collection, making the jump to FX seems all the more difficult. This is why I will probably just wait for a newer DX body.
     
  2. tgara macrumors 6502a

    tgara

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    Location:
    Connecticut, USA
    #2
    Those are nice shots, thanks for sharing.

    I'm a Canon shooter, but to boost your shutter speed you might try increasing your ISO to 400 or so. I've found that ISO speed is a good compromise and allows a fairly fast SS to stop motion.

    As for exposure, watch your histogram. Beach shots are sometimes difficult because of the brightness of the scenes (sun and white sand). The cameras usually want to reduce exposure in order to compensate for this brightness, and that oftentimes results in an image that is too dark. Set your exposure compensation at +1 or so to keep the image in the right exposure range. Again, watch your histogram.
     
  3. Dick Whitman thread starter macrumors 6502

    Dick Whitman

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    #3
    Thanks, appreciate the feedback. I've found that my camera tends to blow out highlights so I may experiment with lowering exposure. Not sure if this will help or not. I will make a mental note to remember to check my histogram though I am still learning how to accurately interpret it.
     
  4. macphunteam macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2014
    #4
    For any equipment you're thinking of buying, you might want to rent it first and try it out. I saw that Borrowlenses is having a great Thanksgiving deal starting now and they have all the gear you mentioned.
    Nice photos, BTW :)
     

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