Architectecs Autocad 3ds Max Rhino users please help

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by thefreakid, Aug 6, 2007.

  1. thefreakid macrumors member

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    Jul 11, 2007
    #1
    hey everyone, i am going to start studying architecture this coming fall. I was just wondering if any of you can shed some light on how the Mac book pro 15" 2.4ghz edition or any other macbook pro works using these programs. I kno i will have to use parallels or perhaps bootcamp to run them in windows and i was just wondering if it is any different then using a windows based pc. I also know that macs do have 1 button on the trackpad and was wondering how that affects my situation aswell. Thank You for all your help.
     
  2. kolax macrumors G3

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    Mar 20, 2007
    #2
    Using Parallel's is the best option - you don't have to restart your Mac and you can use coherence mode so it seems like Autocad is running natively on your Mac (no taskbar or Windows stuff being shown - just the application running with the OSX desktop).

    It'll work exactly the same as it would on any other Windows machine - because you are running Windows after all.

    To right-click on Parallel's, you put 2 fingers on the trackpad - the keyboard and mouse don't change when you use Parallel's, same functionality.

    If using Boot Camp, you right-click by putting 2 fingers on the trackpad and pressing the click button.
     
  3. thefreakid thread starter macrumors member

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    Jul 11, 2007
    #3
    my biggest fear is that i wont know how to use a mac and that i will run into a lot of trouble, i bought myself a sony vaio fz190 and ended up returning it because of horrible customer service and dead pixels. I just dont want to run into software problems later on in college beacuse iw ont have the money to buy another windows based laptop. I have been arguing this decision for a while and i really dont know what to do. I need a very high end laptop to run all this software for the next 5 years but i also want to feel comfortable using it.
     
  4. TheRealness macrumors member

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    Aug 6, 2007
    #4
    u wouldn't want to use a track pad in architecture anyway, you could always just put in a windows usb mouse so it shouldn't be a problem
     
  5. Neanderphil macrumors member

    Neanderphil

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    Sep 28, 2006
    #5
    My friend recently moved from a dell to a mac in the third year of his architecture course and wishes that he made he made the move sooner. He upgraded to the 17" macbook pro with the improved screen res and finds that the computer lets him get on with his work and is not the stumbling block that windows used to be when his creative juices were flowing. He currently uses sketchup pro, photoshop and archicad in osx and boots into windows whenever he needs to, which is rarely.
     
  6. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    #6
    If you run Bootcamp, you do have a Windows laptop when you boot Windows. While booted in Windows it's a straight-up, Core2Duo Windows laptop.

    However, there is no computer made that can promise you 100% troublefree, 100% no-brainer operation. You are going to have to learn the machine regardless. And there is a small but real chance you will get a machine with defects and will have to return or have it fixed.

    You need to have a good think about the realities of your expectations, here. If you truly can't cope with computer management *(licke a number of members of my own family ;)) you need to make sure you have knowledgeable friends or hired help available to help you with the computer (whichever computer you choose)
     
  7. thefreakid thread starter macrumors member

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    Jul 11, 2007
    #7
    i am pretty well off with any computer, i used to do computer repair. I just figured spending 2300 on a sony pc you would get a flawless machine and if not atleast they would replace it. Instead they made me return it and if i wish i may reorder. I am willing ot learn osx, but i just dont want to run into software issues i know that i will mostly use autocad 3dsmax rhino and photoshop and i just wish someone can confirm that they will run flawlessly. I guess its a stupid fear but i really gotta make a decision and fast
     
  8. DZL macrumors regular

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    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    Pasadena, CA
    #8
    mac pro

    are you dead-set on getting a laptop?

    you will run into performance issues with 3d-heavy scenes with the MBP -

    I'd go with a mac pro; if portability is not an issue --

    I'm a 3d visualist, and am moving from a dell to a mac, and after consulting the people on this forum; I've decided to go w/a mac pro.

    DZL.
     
  9. Neanderphil macrumors member

    Neanderphil

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    Sep 28, 2006
    #9
    Well i doubt anything is going to run flawlessly under windows. Booting into windows via bootcmap on the mac will work just like booting into windows on a dell. The programs will run in exactly the same manner. I also suggest you try archicad :)
     
  10. thefreakid thread starter macrumors member

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    Jul 11, 2007
    #10



    i need the portability because i need to do drafting in school in my classes
     
  11. Sbrocket macrumors 65816

    Sbrocket

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    Jun 3, 2007
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    #11
    The SR MBPs are plenty powerful for a freshman Architecture student. This isn't industrial usage, here; this is just a student. A Mac Pro would be major overkill for a student, takes up more space in a dorm room, costs more than is necessary, and isn't portable.

    @thefreakid: While it isn't exactly what you'll be using, I've been testing out the performance of NX5 and Solidworks in a Bootcamp/VMware Fusion setup that'll I'll be using for the next few years as a Aerospace Engineering student. I've got a SR MBP (specs in sig) and it works just great. If you need all the performance you can squeeze out of the machine for certain occasions, you can use Windows natively with Boot Camp. If you're doing some low-intensity stuff, then virtualization using VMware Fusion should satisfy your needs. In both cases, the CAD programs I mentioned perform very well.

    It will take some getting used to using a Mac laptop, but I think that you won't be disappointed by the performance and flexibility of the current generation MBPs. Of course, this forum is here if you ever need support with something you're unsure about and many other such resources exist.
     
  12. thefreakid thread starter macrumors member

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    Jul 11, 2007
    #12

    thanks, i guess i am going to go with the macbook pro and hope for the best. I have enough worries on my head a freshmen in college, i just dont want he burden of incompatiable laptop. Thanks everyone.
     
  13. jamesybsu macrumors regular

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    Jun 12, 2007
    #13
    im going into my fourth year of architecture school and went from a g4 powerbook to a 2.2 sr mbp. I have been using bootcamp to run rhino3d, autocad, and 3ds max in windows without any problem. I use the mac side to run the adobe suites and any other program, as it runs so much better on the mac. Get the SR MBP, you won't be disapointed. Just out of curiousity, which architecture school you going to?
     
  14. thefreakid thread starter macrumors member

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    Jul 11, 2007
    #14
    Pratt University brooklyn campus what about you?
     
  15. jamesybsu macrumors regular

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  16. thefreakid thread starter macrumors member

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    Jul 11, 2007
    #16
    how are u liking it? is it everything you expected?
     
  17. bgerber macrumors newbie

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    Aug 17, 2006
    #17
    I agree with the points that both Neanderphil and DZL made:

    1) I'm guessing that you do not want the cost of two computers -- a MBP with you in class and a MacPro in your dorm room. If you decide to go with just a MBP, I would definitely get the highest res option on the 17" MBP. I would also load it with RAM and get the best available CPU. I think the real crunch for both AutoCAD and Rhino will be the rendering. BTW, Rhino is very cool although I have not yet tried Release 4.

    2) certainly a modestly outfitted MacPro will handle anything you can throw at it. I would favor the MacPro option not only for the CPU and memory capabilities but also for the Hard Drive capacity as well. I'm a little worried (repeat, a little) about having a decent-sized Windows partition with your architectural apps and still have room on the MBP hard drive for the Mac partition sufficient for a reasonable selection of mac apps. Afterall, you are buying a MBP because you want a Mac, right?

    If you just want a powerful laptop for your Windows based architectural apps, I would look at a Dell M90. It won't be any cheaper loaded than a loaded MBP 17" and it will not be as elegant but it will be a very solid performer for your studies.
     
  18. thefreakid thread starter macrumors member

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    Jul 11, 2007
    #18
    i am not looking for a macbook pro specifically i am just looking for a solid 15.4" laptop which will last me 5 years in my studies, i dont much care for OS although OSX does seem a lot better then windows. What do you personally recomend for my situation
     
  19. jamesybsu macrumors regular

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    Jun 12, 2007
    #19
    Ball State is great - I am looking forward to finishing my BA and we'll see where that will take me.

    As far as your computer, I tried the 17" and it was just to big. The 15" is almost perfect for me, not to big, not to small, and LED screens are AMAZING, very bright and crisp. If you are going to be taking your computer with you to class, field studies, you want something that is going to fit nicely in a backpack. Which brings me to another point, My Powerbook died on me because I really did not have a good backpack and case for it, and it took a lot of abuse as I traveled from classes and on field studies to NYC, Europe, etc. Spend the money on a protective case, and buy a bookbag that has a dedicated laptop slot.

    BTW - Rhino 4.0 is da bomb. I tend to build a 3d model on my computer and test the materials on it, then render it on our schools computers and basically setup a render station or two and let them render over night. I only use autocad for wall sections and floorplans, so it doesn't really use much memory when you only work in 2D. If you can afford the 2.4 Ghz 15" I would get that, then upgrade to 4GB of ram at like OWC or something, but like I said, if you have the money. I have the standard 2.2 and its more than I could ask for.
     
  20. jamesybsu macrumors regular

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    Jun 12, 2007
    #20
    The great thing about the MBP is you can run both windows and osx. Currently, you can only run Rhino and Autodesk applications in windows, although I have read from architosh.com that rhino will soon be comming to a mac platform as well (I can only hope!) The best thing about the MBP is all the little things that make it so nice. Everything from the back-light keyboard which is great in dark lecture halls, to expose in th operating system that i use ALL THE TIME when I am editing pictures from Photoshop to Indesign, etc. I questioned buying a mac when I started, and I don't have a regret yet.

    Not to mention, as a designer, you might as well get a computer that looks like something a designer would use :)
     
  21. thefreakid thread starter macrumors member

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    Jul 11, 2007
    #21
    thnx for the help everyone, i didnt know there were so many deisgn majors using macbooks out here
     
  22. jamesybsu macrumors regular

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    Jun 12, 2007
    #22
    well if your going to design the best - you have to use the best :apple:
     
  23. thefreakid thread starter macrumors member

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  24. jamesybsu macrumors regular

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  25. powermac_daddy macrumors 6502

    powermac_daddy

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    Philadelphia & Northern California
    #25


    I got a SR MBP for Penn M.Arch3.
     

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