Are there any decent books for switchers from Windows -> Mac?

danielbriggs

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 13, 2006
291
1
Manchester, UK
Hi!

Basically what the title said. I know I could do everthing on these forums, but as a reference books go, are there any anyone can reccomend for an experience windows user that is going to switch onto a Merom MBP (not that the chip makes a difference!)

I just don't get the whole cloverleaf thingy, when I do a "Win Key" +D nothing happens, how do I "cut" a folder??? just little things like that e.g. propperly maximising and keyboard shorts etc. just to get me up to speed.
And that's only from playing on the demo model in the shop for 10 mins!

It feel's like it's a good system, but it's waiting for me to "use" it properly etc.


Any reccomendations? (UK shops/books please) or Amazon.co.uk


Dan :)
 

amac4me

macrumors 65816
Apr 26, 2005
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I also urge you to ask questions as response from current Mac users will prove beneficial.

Regards
 

danielbriggs

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 13, 2006
291
1
Manchester, UK
Thanks all, I've just orderd the 2 pogue books "switching to the Mac" and the "missing Manual"

A snap at £11 each!


Got the bag, got the mouse, got the book (in a day or two) just need the MBP Merom!

amac4me:
But yes, I will keep posting my problems, (when I hit a brick wall with the book) as I think everyone would get fed upwith me keep asking "how do you right click" etc. (I think it's command click or something)
anyway!
Nice site amac4me, but i'm already convinced into getting one! :)


Slightly off topic, what CD's do you get with the MBP usually, as PC manufactures are getting dead tight now, i.e. no CD's etc.
Just wondering!


Dan :)
 

Chundles

macrumors G4
Jul 4, 2005
11,966
375
danielbriggs said:
Thanks all, I've just orderd the 2 pogue books "switching to the Mac" and the "missing Manual"

A snap at £11 each!


Got the bag, got the mouse, got the book (in a day or two) just need the MBP Merom!

amac4me:
But yes, I will keep posting my problems, (when I hit a brick wall with the book) as I think everyone would get fed upwith me keep asking "how do you right click" etc. (I think it's command click or something)
anyway!
Nice site amac4me, but i'm already convinced into getting one! :)


Slightly off topic, what CD's do you get with the MBP usually, as PC manufactures are getting dead tight now, i.e. no CD's etc.
Just wondering!


Dan :)
Right-click = control+click
Cloverleaf thingy = "command", most Windows functions that use "control" are replaced with this key ie Copy = command-C.

The MacBook Pro comes with full restore DVDs for both the OS and the bundled software. None of this "make your own restore disc" malarkey.

There is no "Maximise," there is a "Zoom" that expands a window to be as big as it needs to be. Mac OSX is designed to work with multitasking as it's prime function, having a window open full-screen (though there's nothing to stop you manually resizing a window to do so, the program will remember it so you won't have to do it all the time) severely restricts your ability to multitask.

For example, say i want to copy an image from the internet into a word document - with Windows it involves a bunch of copying and pasting, minimising and maximising, with Mac OSX, you'd have the Word document open next to the browser window and you just drag the image from one window to the other. Piece of cake.
 

risc

macrumors 68030
Jul 23, 2004
2,756
0
Melbourne, Australia
danielbriggs said:
Slightly off topic, what CD's do you get ...
Macs come with restore media. The restore media is made for that model only and includes the current version of OS X, the current version of iLife, Front Row and PhotoBooth (on some Macs), and 3rd party stuff. The 3rd party stuff varies based on the machine you buy, ie. get an iMac or MacBook and you get games etc, get a MacBook Pro or Mac Pro and you get "pro" stuff. http://www.apple.com/hardware/ has links to all of the machines and includes a list of the included software (look for the Software part under Tech Specs).
 

danielbriggs

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 13, 2006
291
1
Manchester, UK
Lovely...

:)

I was getting annoyed with myslef in the shop why it wasn't maximsing properly (and didn't want to ask, lol!)

I'm learning already!

Like it :D
 

danielbriggs

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 13, 2006
291
1
Manchester, UK
risc said:
Macs come with restore media. The restore media is made for that model only and includes the current version of OS X, the current version of iLife, Front Row and PhotoBooth (on some Macs), and 3rd party stuff. The 3rd party stuff varies based on the machine you buy, ie. get an iMac or MacBook and you get games etc, get a MacBook Pro or Mac Pro and you get "pro" stuff. http://www.apple.com/hardware/ has links to all of the machines and includes a list of the included software (look for the Software part under Tech Specs).

Phew.. That's good then!

Because usually when I buy a laptop (PC one) for me or someone else. the usualy thing is: 1. Unpack 2. Format 3. Reinstall Windows 4. Install Office 5. Drivers 6. Printers ..... zzz...ZZZ...zzz

And I can only do that as I use my CD version of software with their new keys.

Oh well!

Time to change! (for the better!)


I like the fact, that if I mess up my MBP, then backup my data, insert the DVD and it's back as it was. None of this self formatting, up till 1AM finding drivers etc. etc.

Nice!
 

Chundles

macrumors G4
Jul 4, 2005
11,966
375
danielbriggs said:
Lovely...

:)

I was getting annoyed with myslef in the shop why it wasn't maximsing properly (and didn't want to ask, lol!)

I'm learning already!

Like it :D
Ask away, that's why we're here.

Actually, search first, then ask. Might keep the crazies away if you search first, I don't mind answering the common simple questions so ask away.
 

Chundles

macrumors G4
Jul 4, 2005
11,966
375
danielbriggs said:
I like the fact, that if I mess up my MBP, then backup my data, insert the DVD and it's back as it was. None of this self formatting, up till 1AM finding drivers etc. etc.

Nice!
No more hunting for drivers, they all come with it. No more 1am reinstalls, I've reinstalled once in two years because I wanted to see how it worked - took about half an hour to do a full reinstall and then another 10 minutes or so to index my HDD for Spotlight.

Software updates took an age though because of the pitiful speed of broadband internet down here in the wide brown land.

Here's the process:

1. Unpack.
2. Follow set-up procedure and enjoy little video
3. Away you go.
 

danielbriggs

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 13, 2006
291
1
Manchester, UK
Chundles said:
then another 10 minutes or so to index my HDD for Spotlight.

Nice!
Thanks for all that.

My question is, indexing, does is slow your system down, but makes searching quicker?

Is that all it does?

Ta!

Dan :)
 

Chundles

macrumors G4
Jul 4, 2005
11,966
375
danielbriggs said:
Nice!
Thanks for all that.

My question is, indexing, does is slow your system down, but makes searching quicker?

Is that all it does?

Ta!

Dan :)
Slows it down for a little while at the start while it's doing it's thing. After it's done the indexing happens on the fly - there is no system slow down. It lets Spotlight search by all sorts of criteria - you can search for words and phrases in .pdf files, a god-send for me when searching through science journal articles off the net.

Instant searching, type in a word that you know isn't on the machine like "boondoggle" - nothing will come up, leave the search window open and save a file containing that word - the search window updates automatically.

It also lets you make Smart Folders that will contain files that fit a set of rules that you create, they automatically update so as soon as you make another file that fits those rules, a link to that file appears in the smart folder so you always know where it is.
 

danielbriggs

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 13, 2006
291
1
Manchester, UK
Chundles said:
Slows it down for a little while at the start while it's doing it's thing. After it's done the indexing happens on the fly - there is no system slow down. It lets Spotlight search by all sorts of criteria - you can search for words and phrases in .pdf files, a god-send for me when searching through science journal articles off the net.

Instant searching, type in a word that you know isn't on the machine like "boondoggle" - nothing will come up, leave the search window open and save a file containing that word - the search window updates automatically.

It also lets you make Smart Folders that will contain files that fit a set of rules that you create, they automatically update so as soon as you make another file that fits those rules, a link to that file appears in the smart folder so you always know where it is.

Thanks for your help!

I'm liking OS X more and more every day.. Even though I don't have it yet!
Still waiting for the Merom!


Dan :)
 

savanahrose

macrumors 6502a
Jul 31, 2006
791
1
greer SC
Amazingly enough, I just found a book at Books a million about macs and OS X. I am in the market for a mac and I thought I would read up on it before then.

I find the book to be easy to understand and surprisingly, I am not bored with it.

It is called: The rough guide to Macs and OS X by Peter Buckley and Duncan Clark.

ISBN: 13: 978-1-84353-553-9

Check it out. Maybe the local library will have it.
 

FFTT

macrumors 68030
Apr 17, 2004
2,952
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A Stoned Throw From Ground Zero
If you are convenient to your local Apple Store, they also offer free classes for those new to Mac OSX and tutorials for just about every application.

I was waiting for a pick-up at the Genius Bar and had a blast attending the free
GarageBand orientation class.

It would have taken me forever to learn all those capabilites on my own.

Your local store should have a schedule of the classes they offer.

Apple also offers highly advanced training seminars for Pro applications.

Well worth it if you use your system to generate income.
 

MSM Hobbes

macrumors 6502
Aug 25, 2006
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NE Hoosierana
Any additional thoughts on these books, specifically for those new to Mac and/or Tiger?

1. The Rough Guide to Macs and OSX
2. Mac OS X Tiger Killer Tips
3. Mac OS X Tiger: In a Nutshell
4. Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Tiger Edition
5. Mac OS X Tiger: Missing Manual
6. Mac OS X Tiger Pocket Guide (Pocket References)
7. The Little Mac Book, Tiger Edition
8. ...other recommendations...?

For example, any benefit of getting both of David Progue's "Missing Manual" books?
 

danielbriggs

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 13, 2006
291
1
Manchester, UK
Any additional thoughts on these books, specifically for those new to Mac and/or Tiger?

1. The Rough Guide to Macs and OSX
2. Mac OS X Tiger Killer Tips
3. Mac OS X Tiger: In a Nutshell
4. Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Tiger Edition
5. Mac OS X Tiger: Missing Manual
6. Mac OS X Tiger Pocket Guide (Pocket References)
7. The Little Mac Book, Tiger Edition
8. ...other recommendations...?

For example, any benefit of getting both of David Progue's "Missing Manual" books?

I settled for the 2 "missing manuals".
"Mac OS X Tiger" and "Switching to the Mac" Both Pogue.

I know they overlap.
But both really is a good combination. As The "Mac OS X Tiger" is like a big book that is worth a skim read and mainly as a reference for all things Mac et.c Where are "Switching to a Mac" is probalby more useful in day to day use. As it is like a big index. i.e. you look up the feature that you are use to with Windows i.e. control pannel. and it tells you all about the Mac equilivent andwhere / how / what etc. etc.

However, both books do both, but as a base, you can't go wrong with the "Mac OS X Tiger"
And if your a switcher, tack on the "Switching Book" as well to aid the transition.


Dan :)
 

Stadsport

macrumors regular
Nov 9, 2006
162
0
Here's the best advice I've ever heard for switchers:
If you go into OS X expecting it to work like Windows, and trying to do things like you would in Windows, you're gonna have a hard time and probably be left unsatisfied and frustrated.

If you go into OS X expecting it to be a completely different operating system, you'll pick it up in a snap. After using it for 30 minutes I felt like a pro. :D
 

FFTT

macrumors 68030
Apr 17, 2004
2,952
0
A Stoned Throw From Ground Zero
Peachpit Press also has some good books including their guide to iLife '06 applications.

If you really want to learn any specialized applications, there are several good online and interactive DVD training series available.

Just Google Apple training.