Are there any ice cooler pad for the MacBook?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by galaksy, May 20, 2014.

  1. galaksy macrumors 6502

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    Apr 19, 2014
    #1
  2. TheIguana macrumors 6502a

    TheIguana

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    Canada
    #2
    What are you doing daily that gets your Mac heating up so much?

    The amount of RAM you have has no bearing on the amount of heat your Mac will produce.
     
  3. galaksy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Apr 19, 2014
  4. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    Jul 30, 2003
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    Delaware
    #4
    CPU load
    GPU load
    The Airport card heats up pretty nicely when streaming vid, or copying files wirelessly, other operations as well.
    There's a good amount of heat generated when doing large file transfers to your internal hard drive (SSD, not so much)
    Power usage just isn't 100% efficient. There's always heat generated in most any operation.

    Finally, most Mac users get along fine without auxiliary cooling, as the aluminum case is a VERY good radiator, much better than the cheaper plastic units that other manufacturers try to push off on the buyer. The Macs can get quite warm, because that's what they are designed to do.
    As long as you don't block the cooling pathways, you will be fine.
     
  5. galaksy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Apr 19, 2014
    #5
    I thought if the fan's running, it is dangerously hot.

    And so, wouldn't it be better if there was always a cooling device?

    Do desktops get that hot? Maybe this is why one should get a desktop? to avoid the unpleasant heat and fan noise?

    I think i prefer the plastic because that way the heat doesn't accidentally burn your skin, and they have a side vent that pushes out the heat more aggressively.
     
  6. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    Delaware
    #6
    No.
    The fan is _always_ running when the MBPro is powered on and awake (but typically at an idle speed ~1600 to 1800 RPM)
    You will usually only hear the fan when it kicks up well beyond idle, when it needs more air flow.
    Most folks learn by experience that you won't want to use most laptops on bare legs. And that's partly why you started this thread, because you want the laptop to stay reasonably cool, and some kind of external cooling is OK, but not always portable...

    And, if you need portability, a desktop computer isn't the answer either.
     
  7. galaksy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Apr 19, 2014
  8. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    #8
    ?
    Bare means naked, or uncovered.
    You have a dictionary on your Mac - you can use it:
    If you have shorts on, your legs (where your lap is when sitting down) will not have the protection of cloth, but will be bare, hence, bare legs... :D
    And - not a recommend location to use your laptop Mac.
    That's a good reason that the word "laptop" is not as common as it once was.
    People used to actually use them on their lap...
     
  9. Badrottie Suspended

    Badrottie

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    Los Angeles
    #9
    Have you tried to build an igloo house? it is the nay way to keep it super cold air. :apple:
     
  10. leman macrumors 604

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    Oct 14, 2008
    #10
    You can't have 32GB in a MacBook ;)
     
  11. AndyK macrumors 65816

    AndyK

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    Jan 10, 2008
    #11
    Which model do you have? Those cooler pads are just gimmick monkey sinks that intact make hardly any difference.

    Keeping your laptop in a position where the intakes / exhaust are clear is the key to letting it keep itself cool, but no "cooler pad" is going to stop it getting excessively hot under heavy load.
     
  12. GhettoMrBob macrumors regular

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    May 21, 2014
    #12
    Few questions to get a better idea:

    - Age of machine/model (possible dust buildup in fan, older CPU struggling, etc.)
    - When is machine getting hot/what is being used when getting hot?
     
  13. galaksy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Apr 19, 2014
    #13
    2009 MBP 13''.

    When there is too much tabs, mainly. When I go beyond about 5-7 tabs.
     
  14. GhettoMrBob macrumors regular

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    May 21, 2014
    #14
    If you're feeling adventurous, you could pop the bottom case off and take a look at the fan. See if it isn't clogged up with dust. Given that it's a 2009, that's a good number of years for dust to build up. IF that's the case, cleaning that up can give some pretty significant temperature drops as the hot air is actually being expelled rather than remaining in the case.
     
  15. galaksy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Apr 19, 2014
    #15
    Could I get an Apple store guy do it for me for free?

    How do you clean it up? Just pinch and scrape with fingers?

    ----------

    So the more powerful your processor is, the less heat there is going to be?
     
  16. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    #16
    That's a strange conclusion.
    If the processor consumes more power, then, if all remains equal, more heat will be produced.
    However, as technology progresses, processors are manufactured in smaller packages, which typically results in better power efficiency, and less heat produced, despite the fact that the processor is more powerful. Another good result, in a portable, can be better battery life.
     
  17. GhettoMrBob macrumors regular

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    May 21, 2014
    #17


    Not sure if they'd do it at an Apple store or not. The process is pretty simple:
    - Undo the screws on bottom side, pull off cover.
    - Firstly just kind of check the fan for dust/debris. If there is, a small paint brush or can of compressed air can help blow it out.
    - If you happen to have a torx (may just be standard philips as well) screwdriver you could remove the 3 screws holding the fan in place, unplug it's connection, remove it and check the heatsink grate behind it to make sure it's not blocked up with dust as well.

    All in all, it's a very simple procedure that shouldn't be intimidating at all.
     

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