Art versus Science

Discussion in 'iPad' started by vrDrew, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. vrDrew macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Location:
    Midlife, Midwest
    #1
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    If you want to understand why the iPad has been such a runaway success (and other tablets are still struggling) take a look at the screen shot for the AmpliTube "Fender" app for the iPad.

    Now, I'm no musical or guitar wizard (so forgive any technical gaffes I make) - but looking at that App, I'd say ANY competent electric guitar player, from Chubby Checker to Slash to a kid who never played outside his parents basement could start using that App pretty much immediately. If you've filled with the knobs on a physical amp or stomp box, you know how this App works.

    The iPad doesn't force the user to get into the technology of the device. It simply lets you work with your art or craft in a way your are already familiar with. It just makes doing so a lot more portable, and lets you record and tweak the sounds or pictures or words you create into something better than they could have been before.

    Its not just muscial Apps either. Look at what David Hockney and Jorge Columbo have done with their fingers using Brushes for the iPad.

    [​IMG]

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    These guys didn't have learn about computers to do this. They simply had to take a few minutes familiarizing themselves with a new tool - and then used the skill and artistry they already had in new, creative, and unique ways. They don't care about multitasking, or Flash animation, or USB ports, or SD card slots. They don't care about RAM or dual-core processors. They don't care about open-source or walled gardens. They simply want something that works they way they do.

    And so do millions of ordinary people around the world.
     
  2. blipmusic macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2011
    #3
    Big screen to show it all off in a device that is still small enough to use in your armchair, small enough to carry in any bag. No limitations in portraying real life interfaces, whether that is a guitar or a lamp switch.

    Touch the screen, which is also the interface, to interact and create in ways that are logical to the real life counter parts. The "aperception leap" suddenly becomes almost non-existant.

    Bonus: It'll only get better from here on.
     
  3. nalk7 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    #4
    Totally agree with you sir, this thing really is magical! :D
     

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