Attractive starting price, expensive with useable storage!

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by iMas70, Oct 30, 2018.

  1. iMas70 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2012
    Location:
    MA
    #1
    The entry level price of $799 is pretty good but who can get by with 128GB of storage? Add $400 for 512GB and $800 for 1TB. I understand it’s a SSD but still. 1TB and a few other upgrades bumps the Mini up to a huge price of $2K. Is it better to go with 128GB and an external drive?

    I’m trying to decide between this for my teen kids or give them my full spec 2015 iMac then I buy a new one for myself. Actually, the new iMac might be a better choice for me. There will be a 5K screen for an extra few hundred. Decisions...
     
  2. zen macrumors 68000

    zen

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2003
    #2
    That $799 is with an **i3**. That's just ridiculous. Move to i5 (ie, pretty much the baseline for modern computing) and it costs $1099. Holy smokes.
     
  3. LaloG macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2013
    #3
    Yeah. I was just looking at the costs and for the base 27” 5k will be about the same as the mini after buying extra storage and all the other stuff. Trying to decide myself.
     
  4. sartrekid macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2014
    Location:
    Germany
    #4
    Actually, given that they charge an arm and a leg for storage, I quite like that they're offering this low an option. That way one can use the internal ssd as a boot drive, and the get proper external storage for everything else without having to shell out the high markup that Apple charges for storage.
     
  5. Kurri macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
  6. redheeler, Oct 30, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2018

    redheeler macrumors 604

    redheeler

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2014
    #6
    $799 model should have the i5 and $1,099 model should have the i7. If Apple had done that, there wouldn't be much to complain about (other than maybe the lack of dGPU, but with the switch to desktop processors and possibility of eGPU is something I'm willing to forgive). The 128 GB SSD at the $799 price point is not a disappointment to me, but rather something I hoped for (and as other have pointed out, storage is upgradable, externally).

    But like nearly all modern Apple products, it has to be $100 or $200 overpriced in some way...
     
  7. WilliamG macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2008
    Location:
    Seattle
    #7
    Has literally become out of control with the pricing lately. My jaw hit the floor with the mini.
     
  8. MisterAndrew macrumors 65816

    MisterAndrew

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2015
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    #8
    You can upgrade the i3 model to i7 and it's $1099 also. That's a pretty good deal.

    Just in case anyone is complaining about the price here's the 2012. It cost $1199 with a quad core i7, 8GB RAM, and 256GB SSD. Equivalent specs on the new one costs $1299.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20130307214740/http://store.apple.com/us/configure/MD388LL/A
     
  9. Mannaerts macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Location:
    Belgium, Antwerp
    #9
    Is the i3 base model enough for a Plex 4k server?
    Only one user is using Plex here so no multiple stream at the same time
     
  10. oldmacs macrumors 601

    oldmacs

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Location:
    Australia
    #10
    Prices should have fallen... not risen.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 30, 2018 ---
    Not a very seemless experience.
     
  11. MisterAndrew macrumors 65816

    MisterAndrew

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2015
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    #11
  12. redheeler macrumors 604

    redheeler

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2014
    #12
    The switch from mobile to desktop processors makes it more difficult to compare the 2018 Mac mini to older models. In actuality, Intel's desktop processors as found in the 2018 Mac mini are cheaper than Intel's mobile processors as found in the 2012 Mac mini, so you'd expect a higher-end processor at the same price point.

    The costs of a 256 GB SSD and 8 GB RAM in 2012 are not comparable to the costs of those things in 2018.
     
  13. oldmacs macrumors 601

    oldmacs

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Location:
    Australia
    #13
  14. Phil A., Oct 30, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2018

    Phil A. Moderator

    Phil A.

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Location:
    Shropshire, UK
    #14
    The upgrade costs for storage are outrageous IMO - you can get a 1TB NVMe SSD with comparable performance for less than half the price Apple are charging to go from 128GB to 1TB (an 1TB Evo 970 is £258 on Amazon and Apple want £720 for the upgrade)
     
  15. MisterAndrew, Oct 30, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2018

    MisterAndrew macrumors 65816

    MisterAndrew

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2015
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    #15
    Yeah, I'd like to know if a regular NVMe SSD can be installed in it. It looks like it's some proprietary design though and maybe soldered to the logic board.
     
  16. tedson macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    #16
    So for $100 more you get a much faster 6/12 core I7 and a much faster SSD. I can live with that.
     
  17. kevink2 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    #17
    In my case, I have a 4K monitor that has an unused HDMI port, so I can plug the Mini into it and switch on monitor between Mac and Windows as needed. If the Mini hadn't been upgraded, or had just been a minor spec bump, I would probably have got a 21" 5K iMac. Then had to worry about where to put it.

    It would have been nice if it was cheaper. Even nicer if Apple had paid me to accept one.

    Some people have complained about how much more it is than some of the Intel NUCs. If I was wanting to build a new Windows or Linux box, that would probably be how I would go, but I decided I was tired of spending time on keeping a Hackintosh working. And these NUCs appear to be even harder to keep working than my Skylake system was.
     
  18. Moolani macrumors member

    Moolani

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2012
    #18
    My current Mini uses a 4 TB external hard drive for data, so I really don't need to max out the SSD in the machine itself. 128GB is too small, going to go with at least 256GB anyway with the higher model. Might even do 512 GB. Anymore would be overkill for my purposes.
     
  19. ziggy29 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2014
    Location:
    Oregon North Coast
    #19
    To me the sweet spot looks like 16 GB of RAM (since it appears to be upgradeable don't need more yet), a 6-core i7, a 256 GB storage device (also have a 500 GB Samsung T5 I can repurpose). With four very fast I/O ports, you really don't need to pay the Apple Tax on too much internal storage. I already have an eGPU with Radeon RX580, too. It works pretty well even with the TB1 on my 2012 Mini, so I'd imagine even better here.
     
  20. Fishrrman macrumors P6

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #20
    "Is it better to go with 128GB and an external drive?"

    I'd "pay the price" for 256gb, and then add external storage as required.
    128gb is just a little on the small side. It can work, but it could be "tight".

    USB-c and USB3.1 gen 2 should yield speeds that are "fast enough" for most users.
    Something like a Samsung t5 or Sandisk Extreme USB3 SSD would do fine.

    But... remember... if you add a second (external) drive, you have to keep that one backed up, too.
     
  21. Moolani macrumors member

    Moolani

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2012
    #21
    My current Mini has an external drive for data, and a second external drive backing up both the internal drive and external drive via Time Machine.
     
  22. bbnck, Nov 1, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2018

    bbnck macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    #22
    What people are forgetting is the i3 in the Mac mini is an 8th generation quad-core processor and provides similar levels of performance in synthetic benchmarks to the 7th generation 3.4 GHz i5-7500 in the base 27-inch iMac. The i3 processor doesn't have Turbo Boost, but it's a quad-core chip and most pro apps are multithreaded and will take advantage of all four cores.

    I don't like how little storage is offered on both models and I've also noticed they've removed the SD card slot and reduced the selection of USB-A ports to just two (I struggle with just four ports on the iMac), but the i3 quad-core processor is very reasonable for a starting configuration and as a software engineer, the base model would serve me perfectly well.

    On storage, we all know how much more expensive they are than a traditional hard drive and we all demanded SSDs in updated Mac minis and clearly Apple delivered. They wanted to hit a certain price point on the entry configuration, I understand that.

    I was hoping for discrete graphics in the new Mac mini but eGPUs open up that possibility down the line, but eGPUs are still not a very economical way to increase the GPU power of a Mac. And I doubt ever will be.

    Overall, it's a very pro-focused update and for the most part, it's exactly what I think a lot of us wanted. If I were to buy a Mac mini, I would need to buy a Thunderbolt 3 hub due to the lack of SD card slot and reduced set of USB-A ports, and upgrade to a 512 GB SSD. It does make a Mac mini purchase more expensive than I would have liked.
     
  23. ElectronGuru, Nov 1, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018

    ElectronGuru macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2013
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    #23
    People seem trained. Trained to think of i3 as inferior and trained to expect better processors at higher prices points. The pro mini adds a bunch of things to the base but this looks like paying more for less. Things will get easier as reports come in showing how amazing the minimal configuration is.

    I always pay the $200 to delete the HDD and would have done so here. So in a sense, my configuration is built in. But I also understand retail and think they should have tried harder to keep a $600 price point. Even a slow SSD+dual core, assuming intel even makes one in this family.

    Ports are a transitional problem. In 5 years, usbc will be so ubiquitous you’ll wish there were more. And usbc can power usba but not the other way around. They clearly put as many ports as would fit, and also put effort into not changing the case (larger or smaller). In the meantime, quality hubs don’t cost that much.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06ZZ7NDTG/


    If I were Apple I would allow usbC to really change the dynamic. Look at bringing back displays and including GPUs in them. GPUs wouldn’t need cases and wouldn’t need more than that display’s power so should cost less. And could then offer GPUless versions of most Macs.
     
  24. Hacksic, Nov 2, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018

    Hacksic macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2018
    #24
    A lot of people, myself included. I don't want more than 128GB, it would be a complete waste of money.

    Screen Shot 2018-11-02 at 5.15.38 AM.png

    All of those photos are saved in the iCloud, they are only taking space on my MBA because there is room.

    I see so many people complaining about the base model 128GB SSD being too small. But it's definitely not too small for everyone, especially as we move more and more into cloud computing.
     
  25. blairh macrumors 68040

    blairh

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    #25
    How is $800 an attractive starting price when the Mini retailed for $500 previously?!?!
     

Share This Page

46 October 30, 2018