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Apr 12, 2001
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Magix today announced a re-release and update for the Mac version of its popular audio editing software Sound Forge Pro, marking the first update to the software in the last three years.

Magix bought Sound Forge Pro, which was previously owned by Sony, in May of 2016 alongside much of Sony's creative software suite. Since then, Magix has been working on an update for the Mac version of the software, and it's finally ready to debut.

Sound Forge Pro Mac is designed to allow users to record and edit high-quality audio, with support for recording 32 simultaneous channels of 64-bit 192kHz audio. It features one-touch recording tools, pro-level editing workflows, and support for a range of plug-ins, all bundled into a polished interface.

soundforgepro-800x441.jpg

The newest version of the software, Sound Forge Pro Mac 3, offers support for new iZotope plug-ins, industry-standard metering, and added signal and effect processing with Noise Gate, Reverb, Delay, Chorus, Flange, and more.

It also includes improved audio restoration, dynamic rendering for project files, preview for Mastered for iTunes versions, and support for a wider range of video formats.

Going forward, Magix also plans to introduce Sound Forge Audio Studio 12, which will debut during the third quarter of 2017.

Sound Forge Pro Mac 3 can be purchased from the Magix website for $299.99.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Magix.

Article Link: Audio Editing Software Sound Forge Pro Mac Gets First Update in 3 Years
 

keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
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25,277
Sound Forge Pro Mac 3 can be purchased from the Magix website for $299.99.

Boy, stories like this just remind how important it is to pick your creative applications carefully. One company's insistence on using a certain application for training/backwards compatibility purposes can leave you far behind.

Now if only there was a DAW for Mac designed by Apple that had consistent updates, regular bug fixes, frequent additions of new features, no new versions to buy after every iteration of macOS, and had considerably better pricing... if there was such a DAW, why would anybody pick anything else? ;)
 
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jayducharme

macrumors 68040
Jun 22, 2006
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The thick of it
Now if only there was a DAW for Mac designed by Apple that had consistent updates, regular bug fixes, frequent additions of new features, no new versions to buy after every iteration of macOS, and had considerably better pricing
Agreed. And I have that software. ;)

Sound Forge was pretty good a decade ago, but IMO this iteration is overpriced for what you get. I like their rendering of the wave forms, but that alone won't sway me from my current app.
 
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FactVsOpinion

macrumors 6502
Jul 27, 2012
316
506
Boy, stories like this just remind how important it is to pick your creative applications carefully. One company's insistence on using a certain application for training/backwards compatibility purposes can leave you far behind.

Now if only there was a DAW for Mac designed by Apple that had consistent updates, regular bug fixes, frequent additions of new features, no new versions to buy after every iteration of macOS, and had considerably better pricing... if there was such a DAW, why would anybody pick anything else? ;)

That's logical.
[doublepost=1494865281][/doublepost]
Pros still use Macs? /s

Still almost uniquely so in studios.
 
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Bob Zimmerman

macrumors member
Aug 31, 2015
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Forgive my ignorance, I'm no audio auditor, but where can you get 64-bit audio? I've seen plenty of 24-bit (and maybe a handful of 32-bit) analogue/digital converters, but never 64-bit.
Audio is sometimes processed using 64-bit math to maintain precision and reduce aliasing. 24-bit audio can get you a slightly lower noise floor below that of 16-bit. The physics of sound makes 32-or-more-bit sample depths worthless except as an abstraction to enhance precision when you manipulate it.
 
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trisjl

macrumors newbie
Sep 10, 2007
2
1
London
If you are not a Soundforge uaee you may choose other options for sure. For those who used Soundforge on PC and then the Mac as of version 2.x the curent offer from Magix is unenticing, no upgrade offers for exizting user's who have to punt full price again.
 
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dysamoria

macrumors 6502a
Dec 8, 2011
989
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I'm somewhat stunned. I thought this version was dead. It's certainly feature-free compared to the old Windows version (making the price and lack of cross-platform upgrades rather consumer-hostile choices), so I've no interest anyway. I'm glad it's still getting developed though.
 
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Nabby

macrumors regular
Jul 10, 2008
192
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I'm no where near an audio professional. Can someone explain what "pro-level editing workflows" means? Perhaps a dumb-downed example?

Nabby
 
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TheRealTVGuy

macrumors 6502a
Jul 21, 2010
677
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Orlando, FL
This is interesting to me as I used to absolutely FLY through Sound Forge and Vegas. Is Vegas still around? Could I buy that outright instead of having to pay Adobe $20/month for Audition?
 
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drumcat

macrumors 6502a
Feb 28, 2008
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Otautahi, Aotearoa
Audio is sometimes processed using 64-bit math to maintain precision and reduce aliasing. 24-bit audio can get you a slightly lower noise floor below that of 16-bit. The physics of sound makes 32-or-more-bit sample depths worthless except as an abstraction to enhance precision when you manipulate it.

This is precise.

Along with a better noise floor, 24-bit audio files can handle heavy processing better because it handles rounding errors better.

I imagine it's a typo in the article.
 
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