Auto CAD for Mac

Discussion in 'Design and Graphics' started by slabman, Jul 11, 2008.

  1. slabman macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2008
    Location:
    Plano TX
    #1
    I now use AutoCad LT on a Windows system, but want to switch over to my iMac a ditch the Windows. I do not need but afraction of the features of Autocad LT, so am looking for a relatively simple Mac drawing program. My needs are to draw a simple footprint of a building, adding certain symbols to represent needed repairs and activities.

    I've looked at McDraft, but hear it's buggy, ViaCad, Turbocad, DoodleCad and MacDraw, but am not sure what would work best for my needs. Anyone?
     
  2. foshizzle macrumors regular

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  3. Slumbercub macrumors regular

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  4. ejoso macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    #4
    sounds like space layout more than drawing...

    You might consider going the direction of a space planning/layout tool for this task.
    On Windows you could whip something up pretty quickly to handle this with Visio,
    including the import/export of your AutoCAD DWG files as needed.

    The cool thing is that OmniGraffle Pro will handle this for you too.
    I'd highly recommend OmniGroup products across the board - and think
    you should give it your consideration.

    Best of luck finding the right tool to accomplish this task.
     
  5. skd macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Location:
    carmel, ca
    #5
    after using acad for 20 years, I switch to HighDesign (and mac) about 2-1/2 years ago. My architectural office uses HighDesign and SketchUp as the basis of the design and drafting element. HighDesign has by far the best support of any software I've ever used.
     
  6. SteveG4Cube macrumors 6502

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  7. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

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    Cold beer land
  8. skd macrumors 6502

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  9. clarchitecture macrumors newbie

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    Jul 30, 2008
    #9
    Cad program?

    I have been using Powercad for over 10 years on Mac. I have had very few problems overall. It costs initially $1,200. with yearly updates around $400. Compare that to others. I do strictly 2-D drawings. Unlike ACAD, you can change scale at any time. You know exactly how output will look, especially with multiple scales. The full integration with all of macs software is key for me. Drag and drop is not a good part of XP. How many remember the service pack 2 debacle. I have never had that with the Macs. Even with the relative simplicity of Powercad, I don't use half the functions. This program was most like ClarisCad that I started with 15 years ago.
     
  10. AutoCADforMac macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    #10
    AutoCAD for Mac

    While there isnt a native AutoCAD for Mac there is a solution that is almost as good. Parallels just brought out the 4.0 product which includes OpenGL and Direct X. It is now possible to run your AutoCAD on a Mac without dual boot, it runs right on your Mac desktop. And it screams!

    See all the pieces to run AutoCAD on your Mac, user documentation, and trial downloads at our site http://www.autocadformac.com.
     
  11. wheelhot macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2007
    #11
    It sucks there is no native CAD software from popular CADs on Windows like AutoCAD LT, SolidWorks. I really want these 2 to be on the Mac platform. I feel odd using Windows again.
     
  12. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #12
    The 2D version of Turbo cad is easy to use. It has "real" cad features that you are used to. If you pay full price it is about $60. It will import autocad files.

    Turbo Cad is a solid program it makes use of the mac's user interface but still has a "cad feel". but for your usage you don't need much
     
  13. slabman thread starter macrumors member

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    Jan 13, 2008
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    Plano TX
    #13
    I've been running Autocad on Parallels 3.0 for almost a year now and can tell you my performance isn't even close to what's shown on the video demo. Taking 5 minutes (yes, 5 full minutes) to load or save a file does wear on you. So is the new 4.0 really that much faster? And is it bug-free?
     
  14. ukmacpro macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    Location:
    London
    #14
    I'm also going to recommend Vectorworks... I've always found it to be a brilliant piece of software and runs great on the mac.

    The price varies slightly depending on which version you buy, but all are a little over £1000...
     
  15. slabman thread starter macrumors member

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    Jan 13, 2008
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    Plano TX
    #15
    I should also mention, I have Mac programs such as ViaCad, TurboCad and MacDraft and have tried a few others but never have had one of them successfully import a .dwg file. Some of the drawing comes through, but there's enough of a difference to make it unreadable. :confused:
     
  16. iKwick7 macrumors 65816

    iKwick7

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    Dec 29, 2004
    Location:
    The Wood of Spots, NJ
    #16

    Are you doing serious 3d in AutoCad? What's your computer setup?

    I've been running AutoCad 2007 through VMWare Fusion on my iMac (24" iMac, 4 gigs ram) and let me tell you that I often forget that I am running it in a window. It screams. I am only doing 2d work (large jobs though) and I notice no difference than if I was running it on a PC. I think the ram is a huge difference maker (and I only set Fusion to use 2.5 gigs ram in windows, 1.5 gigs in mac).


    As another poster said, try SketchUp. AWESOME prgram - easily my favorite. I do all my 3d in there.

    I've been teaching myself to use ArchiCad so that someday I can drop windows altogether. Some day.
     
  17. iKwick7 macrumors 65816

    iKwick7

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Location:
    The Wood of Spots, NJ
    #17
    HighDesign - how come I never heard of this??!?



    I have never, ever heard of this app! I've been using AutoCad (and briefly learned a little DataCAD way back when) since my freshman year of high school ('95). I became a bit of a pro while in high school and actually taught a new teacher how to use the program (to then teach the class on how to use the program!). Been using AutoCad throughout college, where I then learned about SketchUp when it first came out - been sold on that ever since.

    Since moving to the mac a few years ago, I've always needed to keep a pc for AutoCad and every firm I've ever worked for uses AutoCad (and the Architects didn't really even know how to use the program!).

    Now I am part of a new firm, I almost have my architect's license (just need to take that damned exam!), I have my own office and I make all the computer and software decisions (quite nice since I've decided on an all mac approach). As said in an earlier post, I use AutoCad in a window in VMWare Fusion and it works quite well - but windows just makes me sad. Been teaching myself some ArchiCad on the side (awesome program, very expensive).

    Where the hell did HighDesign come from?? Seriously. I have NEVER heard of this. I just downloaded the demo and I was instantly impressed! I will definitely be buying this very soon to see what I can do with just this program (almost all out work is 2d). It's going to be a great long weekend as I am installing this demo on my macbook and I will be fooling around with it while I visit the parents all weekend.

    If Slumbercub and skd can offer me any advice or any info/help with the program it would be very, very appreciated!



    Here's a link to the demo - I suggest the OP give it a try.

    http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/12049
     
  18. slabman thread starter macrumors member

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    Jan 13, 2008
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    Plano TX
    #18
    I've tried High Design, but can't seem to get it to import a .dwg file. Am I missing something?
     
  19. slinky0390 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    #19
    Hi, I'm currently majoring in architecture at NJIT in NJ and they image our computers in the studio with pretty much all of autodesk's software, sans maya. I would like to do some cad work and also 3d modeling outside of the studio and was wondering if you knew of any software for mac that would compare to 3d studio max. Thanks in advance.
     
  20. skd macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Location:
    carmel, ca
    #20
    HighDesign

    slabman - don't know what you're doing, but I import dwg files all the time. Use the Users forum at the HighDesign web site for any questions. Or you can email HighDesign support, they're really good at getting back with answers.

    iKwick7 - HighDesign was developed by some Italian architects and is IMO the most progressive 2D software available. Especially for the high end residential architecture I do. It took me about a month to make the complete transition from acad to HighDesign. Though I am in a good position where if engineers, surveyors, other designers want to work with me they have to adapt to the software I use.

    feel free to visit my website - www.krebsdesigngroup.com - to either view some of my work or get my contact info.

    rgds
     
  21. iKwick7 macrumors 65816

    iKwick7

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Location:
    The Wood of Spots, NJ
    #21
    Thanks for the response, skd. So do you do ALL of your construction document work in HighDesign as well - no more autocad at all? How do you feel about doing sections and such in HighDesign?


    Where at? NJIT? That's where I went.

    As far as modeling goes, I could never get into 3d max - and I hated the professors that tried to push it down our throats. There really push that program at NJIT.

    There are a few alternatives. Have you ever tried SketchUp? That is, by far, my program of choice. I do all my 3d modeling in there and there are some GREAT post production, hand drawn styles to that program for outputting your work. As for some realistic rendering, I still do ALL my 3d modeling in SketchUp and then export to a free program such as Kerkythea, which is now available on the Mac. It has a bit of a learning curve to it though.
     
  22. skd macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Location:
    carmel, ca
    #22
    for most of my projects -
    I start a project in SketchUp because I find it easier to communicate with my clients in 3D during the conceptual stage. Then after I have approval for the design from the clients I prepare the 2D drawings (architectural & structural) in HighDesign. I have acad loaded on my computer and run it thru bootcamp. I used acad for over 20 yrs. I made the switch to apple computers for my office three years ago. At first after the switch I would use both HighDesign and acad, now I rarely used acad. I use acad mainly to view drawing files that are given to me by clients or engineers. The bottom line is that by using apple computers and mac software my business is more profitable.
     
  23. jonjamesm macrumors regular

    jonjamesm

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2008
    #23
    I use google sketchup pro to render a 3d image - I also use its sister program 'Layout' to turn these images into 2d tech drawings.

    Vector works is also a great tool for quick cad drawings

    Both programs can import DWG files.

    I recommend using them.

    I have noticd that sketchup has trouble producing circles with a large circumference .. anyone else notice this?
     
  24. paulg macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #24
    I use vectorworks architect 2009. its pretty good, but like someone said earlier we only use about 30% of the tools.

    the cheapest option is to get your scale ruler out, a sharp pencil and a sheet of tracing paper!

    paul
     
  25. clarchitecture macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    #25
    Mac Cad

    I have been using Powercad on Mac for 15 years. It is now getting close to $900 for a workstation with base program and Wild Tools add on. I use it because I can train someone to use it in a couple of hours. No extra commands that you don't use every day. You can use this program with the least expensive Mac you can buy. This can't be said for autocad users.

    I sometimes think that I should have a 3-d program, but I have very few clients that would pay to spend the additional time required to do 3-d. However, BIM is here to stay and 3-d is an integral part of that. I have had more clients ask me for a material take off, than 3-d views. Powercad and other 2-d programs are going to have to head that way to remain relevant. I maybe done practicing by then.
     

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