AVI to DVD (MAC)?

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by Reesche, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. Reesche macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    #1
    I would like to convert some AVI videos so they will play on my home DVD player. I have tried Toast and it seems that the "Video" degrades when I transfer using Toast.... I did set it to the "Best" video in the settings....choppy and pixaliated. When I play the AVI files with QuickTime on my computer they are very clear. Toast converts to TS folders. Any ideas on how to translate for a better quality picture?

    Also, Do most home units play Dual Layer DVD's if burnt in toast? My player would not load it. Thanks!
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #2
    .avi is a file format, which uses several codecs, most probably Divx or Xvid, which are based on the MPEG-4 codec.

    Video DVDs use MPEG-2 encoded video files, embedded in .vob files, which in itself are placed in the Video_TS folder on a video DVD.

    MPEG-2 is not as efficient as MPEG-4, so a degradation is always accompanied by re-compressing the video files.

    Have a look around this forum with MRoogle, as your questions is asked a lot of times. And also answered a lot.

    PS: It's called Mac, as MAC means different things and is used for a lot of acronyms. http://www.acronymfinder.com/mac.html
     
  3. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #3
    Are you trying to transcode full length Hollywood movies? The problem is that your single layer DVD holds only 1/2 the data that a "real" DVD holds so Toast is forced to use "extreme" compression. Don't blame toast it is doing the best that can be done.

    You have a few options: (1) cut the film in half and burn each half on it's own DVD or (2) figure out how to burn double layer DVDs. (3) Don't burn DVD, stream the data from a hard drive.
     
  4. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Singapore
    #4
    the only way is to convert it (using a program like Toast, visual hub (isquint) etc). im afraid all other programs will give a somewhat similar result to Toast.
     
  5. whereisgraeme macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    #5
    AVI to DVD? Why???!

    With all of the negatives, roadblocks and time 'burned', my opinion is that without a really really great reason to specifically have DVD formatted discs, another method should be the answer to your post. Any number of options will be faster, easier, save space, time, quality etc etc... it really depends more on #1. what you want to accomplish and then #2. how best to arrive there - as opposed to, #2. How decided before #1. What is given consideration...

    I used to do the same thing - DVDs from other formats to play on my old $300 DVD player... reading about the subject in frustration it became clear to me that other ways of achieving my desired outcome (play H.Theatre quality video with surround sound on HD Television) were far better.

    I have used Toast 9 (not 10!) to burn HD and H.Theater DivX (about 1.5GB per movie) onto regular DVD+R's... 3 films a disk at highest settings, less time to convert, and now even menus, chapters etc etc. My old DVD player did not play DivX, so I bought a full 1080p upscaling Samsung player that will play about anything as long as it is shiny and round! It also upscales the DVD's I have making them look way superior to the results produced by the old unit.... grand total $74.00 tax and HDMI cables included. Many .avi files play as mp4s on the unit as well... so basically I try not to convert if I don't have to. I bought a second any-disc player from Phillips for $20 (about the cost of a small package of Dual-Layer DVD's! but no upscale feature!) - it works great for the older TV in the bedroom. I also give away the discs like hotcakes - no matter as they cost pennies and very little time...

    I have also been using an older iPod Touch (32GB) connected to the television with a dock and component video cables - also a good option for certain stuff.

    Lastly I have 2TB of drives hooked-up to a Mac-Mini which is connected to the home network, can be controlled from my phone, universal remote etc etc... it is a media center with the ability to surf the web, control home electronics etc etc from the couch. It connects to the BOSE via optical cable for super clean sound, and to the TV via Mini-DVI to DVI... so it is good.

    Just some ideas anyways, best of luck!
     

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