Awesome bar for safari

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by dendiz, Aug 21, 2008.

  1. dendiz macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2008
    #1
    Is there a plugin for safari that would make the address bar act like the awesomeBar in firefox 3, where i can just type a few keywords and all the matching URLs from my browsing history are displayed?
     
  2. OliverS macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    #2
  3. dendiz thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2008
    #3
    i do have safari 3.1.2 but this doesn't work like FF3. For example, lets say i visited this url, and it's in my browsing history:
    http://www.myurl.com/mypath/
    when i type "myurl mypath" in FF3 this url appears in the dropdown, but in safari in doesn't
     
  4. AdeFowler macrumors 68020

    AdeFowler

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2004
    Location:
    England
    #5
    My Safari does exactly that.

    I type 'mac' and get a list based on my history and bookmarks.
     

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  5. bashveank macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    #6
    I use Quicksilver and the Safari plugin to do that.
     
  6. dendiz thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2008
    #7
    yep that works great :) thanks.
     
  7. one1 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2007
    Location:
    Chattanooga, TN
    #8
    Launchbar can do that and SAFT has some options for working with it that make it an attractive combination.
     
  8. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    #9
    thats not "exactly", is it?

    try type more than one word in safari's urlbar and see what you get from it.

    awesomebar isn't awesome just because it has history and bookmark as database. Its awesome because how it makes getting where users want easier, by its operational functions.
     
  9. IIeBoy macrumors member

    IIeBoy

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    #10
    I agree, I have tried all of the above add-ons and there is nothing that makes Safari 4 work quite as 'awesome' as Firefox's AwesomeBar.

    E.g. if I visited an Apple Store page a week ago called "MacBook Pro", I could type into Firefox "mac" or "pro" and it'd come up in the address bar almost telepathically. In Safari I'd be lucky if it came in when I typed "store" as Safari only looks at the beginning of the website URL (store.apple.com) or Title, not in the middle or elsewhere. So even if I typed "Apple", that site wouldn't come up as neither the URL or Title begin with 'Apple'.

    Furthermore AwesomeBar learns, so once I have typed in "mac" it will in future put the site at the top of the results because it knows I like to type that then click the resulting suggestion.

    This is extremely useful when you can only remember part of a website name, and has actually resulted in my hardly ever using the bookmarks menu - I used to have to navigate through all the sub-menus of my 100s of bookmarks, but with Firefox I can just type a few letters of what I want, and there it is! It's magic, and until Safari supports something identical, I imagine it will be a deal-breaker for many people.
     
  10. dejo Moderator

    dejo

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Centennial State
    #11
    Your point is valid but you use kind of a bad example, since the URL for the Apple Support Discussions is discussions.apple.com so it will come up. Perhaps using "supp" makes a stronger case.
     
  11. IIeBoy macrumors member

    IIeBoy

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    #12
    Okay I have edited my post to be more accurate for your Royal Pedanticness ;) The new example is quite shocking I think - it can't even find an Apple website when I type "Apple".
     
  12. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    #14
  13. jinx4848 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    #15
    You realize that WebKit (the code that powers at least 95% of Safari) is an open source project, right?

    You can submit a bug report directly to http://webkit.org, maybe even submit a patch if you know how.
     
  14. ert3 macrumors 6502a

    ert3

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2007
    #16
    Trying inquisitor

    I think the major fail with safari is the way its setup. everything has a place and there is a place for everything.

    Prime example being the address bar not forwarding you to a search site when it is unable to connect to an invalid url like say "mac rumors" instead of "macrumors.com".

    however using the google bar with an addon like inquisitor (one of many which is broken in safari 64bit) is much closer to the suggestions we would like to get in the primary address bar.

    Also funny side note I tried to install Inquisitor in safari 64bit (Snow Leopard edition) I found that not only does the plugin not work but the page also did not render properly in safari LULZ
     

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  15. macnfab macrumors regular

    macnfab

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Location:
    NorthEast IN
    #17
    download safari 4? and it does this with no plugins needed. and you get the cool top sites page in you bookmarks bar, as well as a few other enhanced features. I downloaded it long before I upgraded to SL.. no problems, love it:D
     
  16. jive turkey macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    #18
    You guys are misunderstanding what the Awesome bar is. For example, if I want to come back to this thread next week in Firefox, I can hit Cmd-L to get to the location bar, and type "Awesome bar safari" and come directly to this page. You don't need to know any part of the URL as you can use titles as well.

    It is far different from the way Safari handles it. If Safari ever implemented a similar feature I would move to using it in a heartbeat.
     
  17. dyn macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Location:
    .nl
    #19
    Webkit is the renderengine that Safari uses. Safari itself is a bit more than just webkit so submitting a bug to webkit for resolving a Safari interface issue will most likely be closed instantly. It's not something in webkit's control.

    Safari 4 and Firefox 3 & 3.5 have both something similar regarding the addressbar. They both are able to search through the history and bookmarks to dig up a site. And that's where the similarities end. In Safari you can only dig up a site if you type in the first letters of its URL, which means you actually have to remember the first part of the URL. Firefox is much better at digging up sites because it can do what Safari does plus it can use keywords (anywhere in the URL or title of the page), tags and the keyword field. From a user perspective Firefox is an awful lot better at finding a site you forgot. This functionality is all about being able to find the sites you forgot and that is not accomplished with Safari's way of doing it since you need to remember the url. Firefox does not require that, the only thing you need to do is remember *something* about the site. That is a more natural way of doing things. If the list of results is to big you just specify some more keywords to narrow it down.

    Try it for yourself. A default Safari 4 will have a bookmark for google.com and one for maps.google.com. Type in "maps" and the only result will be maps.google.com. Type in "google" and you'll get google.com as the only result. You can also try youtube: type "tube" and it won't find youtube.com but it will if you type "you". Do the same thing in Firefox and it will always return anything that has that keyword in it. So searching for "google" will return google.com and maps.google.com; searching for "tube" or "you" will return youtube.com. And so on.
     
  18. jinx4848 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    #20
    It's not very wise to make assumptions about how projects work when you, in reality, clearly have little knowledge about how the project actually works.

    In addition to being a rendering engine, WebKit is the UI for Safari. If you took 3 seconds to visit http://webkit.org and download a nightly you would find that the app you've just downloaded is in every way equivalent (all the way down to the preference pane) to Safari except for the icon (it's a little more golden to differentiate WebKit builds from official Safari releases). The only real difference is the name and possibly a little extra (1%) fairy dust that goes into each release-- all of which eventually get backported. This includes all of the code for OSX and the Windows releases too. It is all open sourced.

    Opening a UI related ticket at WebKit would be accepted, and in fact it's quite common, since, as I said, the WebKit guys implement the UI that you will eventually see in the Safari release.

    Next time, rather than assuming you know how open source projects work, you should do a little research.
     
  19. dejo Moderator

    dejo

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Centennial State
    #21
    Oh, the irony.

    Back to Basics
     
  20. dyn macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Location:
    .nl
    #22
    Then why on Earth are you still commenting?

    That would be due to the fact the webkit you downloaded uses the Safari GUI. That's why it looks and acts like Safari does. The only GUI thing they develop is the WebInspector.

    Yes please, do some research next time like reading the website which you quite obviously didn't do. The frontpage says:

    One of their non-goals:
    And how you should run your freshly build Webkit:
    In fact running Webkit on Windows requires Safari, without Safari you can't run Webkit. Which is quite obvious for something that is a render engine and not a webbrowser (as they say themselves).

    It might be that the same guys that work on Webkit also work on Safari but that really does not mean they are the exact same projects or that Webkit has a GUI.


    So next time read the website you're linking to before ranting on someone else because as you can see it will backfire ;)

    BTW: I am running the Webkit nightlies for a couple of years now and know what they are and what they do (and how you can disable the standard homepage it starts with). I've also tried using it on Windows which is quite some work compared to drag 'n dropping Webkit to /Applications.
     

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