Awful experience buying Apple Watch in Geneva

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by arubinst, Jun 26, 2015.

  1. arubinst macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Location:
    Lausanne - Switzerland
    #1
    Hi there,

    I reserved a SS 42mm watch this morning and went to the Geneva Apple Store to buy it. The Apple Watch "expert" who helped me didn't have a clue about the watch, the bands or anything else for that matter.

    Anyone else with a similar experience?

    I'm usually not the kind that rants or vents out these things, but it really felt like they had no idea what they were doing there. Here's a copy of the email I just sent to tcook@apple.com about it:

     
  2. SarZ macrumors regular

    SarZ

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    #2
    Rather then sending this email to Tim Cook you should send it to the manager of the Apple store where you had the bad experience
    As far as I've heard Apple provides comprehensive training to all its staff and it is the managers resposibilty to make sure each person is adequately trained to do their job
     
  3. nebo1ss macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2010
    #3
    Why do some feel the need to send an Email to the head of a company for the slightest issue i will never understand. Does it make you feel better? Do you think Tim is going to call up the Geneva store and tell them to improve.
     
  4. toph2toast macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2011
    #4
    It will most likely get passed down the necessary manager. I sincerely doubt Tim Cook will read this.

    My wife had a really bad experience buying an iPhone at an Apple store a few years ago. I wrote an email to Tim Cook explaining the situation. In under a day the email had gotten passed down to the local regional manager who called me to discuss what happened.

    While it sucks that it happened, Apple does care and will most likely do something about it.

    EDIT - @ nebo1ss - Part of the whole Apple experience is their personal touch in stores. How are the supposed to fix a problem unless someone mentions it. I wouldn't call this nit-picking. It's just unprofessional for the employee not to be properly trained if they are the so called "expert".
     
  5. arubinst thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Location:
    Lausanne - Switzerland
    #5
    Thank you, that sounds like a good idea.

    Are these email adresses publicly available somewhere? I went to the particular store page in Apple website but there's only a phone number.
     
  6. arubinst thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Location:
    Lausanne - Switzerland
    #6
    Actually, because of this:

     
  7. arubinst thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Location:
    Lausanne - Switzerland
    #7
    Thank you! That is exactly how I feel. I'm actually not expecting Tim Cook to read the message, but I do know that they have a team of people who take these things seriously.
     
  8. toph2toast macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2011
    #8
    They do. I was able to get my problem solved with the regional manager quickly and to my satisfaction. You did the right thing.
     
  9. nebo1ss macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2010
    #9
    if your intention was to fix the problem you would deal with it at the store. There is nothing wrong with excalating an issue that is not being addressed. However, you don't start with the first complaint to the MD of a company.
     
  10. OneMike macrumors 601

    OneMike

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    #10
    Would've made more sense to complain to the store rather than Tim.
     
  11. shayneox macrumors member

    shayneox

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Location:
    Songtan South Korea
    #12
    Dude , the guy could have been new on the job....maybe his first few days there....its a lot to learn...granted he should have informed you of that if it was the case....but narking on him to the big boss...seems kinda yuppie a$$ if you ask me. You obviously knew all that you needed too when you went in there...from this forum, like all of us did. Why bust someones balls.??
     
  12. triptolemus macrumors 6502

    triptolemus

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2011
    #13
    Nice to know that it isn't just American consumers who have this sort of entitlement attitude.
     
  13. exxxviii macrumors 65816

    exxxviii

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    #14
    So, when you eat a raw hamburger at a Hardees and get sick, is it OK if it is the burger cook's first day on the job? Nope, it is the manager's job to ensure that all staff are trained and able to perform their roles to the corporate standard.
     
  14. triptolemus macrumors 6502

    triptolemus

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2011
    #15
    Well, your first problem would be eating a Hardee's.

    If it's the manager's job to train the employees, than a dissatisfied customer should address their issue with the manager rather than going over the manager's head to the friggin' CEO.
     
  15. shayneox macrumors member

    shayneox

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Location:
    Songtan South Korea
    #16
    haha...thats a good one....but no...I feel,like others have said , it was gone about the wrong way. You could kindly tell the person directly, or just ask to talk to a manager....though if he was a trainee, he should have been wearing something to indicate it. Going to the head of the company....overboard. It is a retail store , they learn on the floor. The majority of all businesses do that. Oh...and you start on fries/drinks and work your way up to the grill , haha Im typing friendly by the way :)
     
  16. exxxviii, Jun 28, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2015

    exxxviii macrumors 65816

    exxxviii

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    #17
    A failure of an employee is a failure of the manager.

    But I also agree that the order of escalation should only and always be:
    1) The person who failed (the employee)
    2) The manager of the person who failed
    3) The highest level up you can reach

    If you did not do the employee the service of discussing the failer, then you should escalate further. And similarly, if you did not do the manager the service of the escalation, then you have no right to escalate beyond the manager. It is basic human courtesy.
    I started on burgers at McDonald's. :) But, I started on drive through at Hardees. ;)
     
  17. imlynxy macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    #18
    You did it right. I also had problem recently, emailed, somebody called me back in couple days , everything was resolved
     
  18. SHNXX macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2013
    #19
    How was the demand for the AW in one of the world's centers of horology?
     
  19. doboy macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2007
    #20
    Nah, I'm sure he/she is an American who just lives there :)
     
  20. arubinst, Jun 28, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2015

    arubinst thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Location:
    Lausanne - Switzerland
    #21
    If you've been reading these forums long enough, you'll probably know that writing to Tim is actually writing to a team of people who actually want to know if something like this is happening so they can fix it. I was not expecting Tim to read my email.

    I'm sorry but I had to wait in line until an Apple Watch "expert" became available. He was introduced to me as a specialist. If the guy is new to the job, he has no business being responsible for this kind of task. I did not "nark" on him either. I did not specifically use his name, nor did I describe him.

    I do know a couple of things about the watch, but I did ask about the things I did not know, obviously... And I asked those things because I wanted to make up my mind about bands, sizes, etc. before giving out the cash.

    I hope you mean this as a joke. I paid the equivalent of about 1000 US$ for the watch, an extra band and Apple Care+ (which by the way, the guy wasn't able to explain to me either. When I asked about the advantage of getting Apple Care, he didn't have a clue). So, I believe when you spend money, you are entitled to get what you pay for. In this case, I reserved a particular watch before going to the store and I received an email saying that they would help me try the one I had reserved and that they would answer every question before validating my buy. I thus felt entitled to receive such service.

    I would not say it was overwhelming. The line and the waiting times were both short.

    I'm not
     
  21. OneMike macrumors 601

    OneMike

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    #22
    My point is I think your issue was tiny and IMO you blew it way out of proportion. Again, that is in my opinion.

    If I felt some type of way, I'd have asked to speak to a manager at the store or if anything called that store and asked for a manager or something when I got home.

    Major issue I'd maybe email. Rant, no. Just me.

    Glad you got your watch and a band either way
     
  22. toph2toast macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2011
    #23
    And what makes you think the store manager will fix the problem? Growing up I worked for a handful of retailers. Some, not all, could care less if a customer complained, I've seen it first hand. Why risk wasting your time if you have a direct line to someone higher up? My attitude is the higher you can go, the more likely the problem will get resolved. A customer is not an employee, so there is no obligation to follow the same chain of command.
     
  23. lclev macrumors regular

    lclev

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2013
    Location:
    Ohio
    #24
    I agree with the arubinst. Apple has and tries to maintain a reputation for excellent service. If the level of service from an "expert" is that bad it is indicative of the level of training which reflects on the manager. Since it seems the only email address available was Tim Cooks, and in the past that has produced results, why not use it?

    This "expert" needs more training and I suspect so do others in this store. Hopefully the email will provide a push for that.
    I have been in several apple stores for various issues and the level of service has been excellent. If the person I was working with did not know the answer they would find someone who did. The people I have encountered have been friendly and knowledgeable. That is what Tim Cook wants everyone to experience when they enter an Apple store. If that is not happening who better to change it?
     
  24. Command macrumors regular

    Command

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2015
    Location:
    USA

Share This Page