Backing up system drive, time machine or bootable backup

Discussion in 'macOS' started by chipandegg, Mar 11, 2010.

  1. chipandegg macrumors regular

    chipandegg

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Location:
    London
    #1
    I am going to backup the main system drive though...


    I'm thinking shall I use Time Machine to back it up or use a 3rd party application to back it up and make it boot-able at the same time??

    thanks
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #2
    Whatever floats your boat, they are both good backup strategies.

    I use the cloning strategy, as TM gave me too much headaches with multiple Macs and HDDs.

    And cloning has the advantage of being bootable, and still being able to use the Migratiion Assistant with.
     
  3. Fishrrman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #3
    "I'm thinking shall I use Time Machine to back it up or use a 3rd party application to back it up and make it boot-able at the same time??"

    Bootable backup all the way.

    This wins over Time Machine, hands down.

    With a bootable backup (created from either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper) your files will be in Finder format, also. Just plug the external drive in and access them. No fooling around.

    YES, others are going to jump into this thread with comments that Time Machine vis-a-vis CCC or SD "do different things". So be it.

    The truth is, how many folks really need several copies of the same file?

    Most folks who "reach for their backup" do so after a catatrosphic crash. They DON'T NEED what Time Machine offers. They need a copy of their files RIGHT NOW. And all too often, I'm seeing posts here from people who have had such a crash, and suddenly find to their dismay that they can't "get to" their Time Machine backups, for this reason or that. You see it on the MacRumors forums again and again, a thread that begins with something to the effect, "can't access my TM backup".

    TM seems to be "backup for non-thinkers". Just plug in the drive and it starts "backing up". Looks really easy. BUT - getting your data BACK from TM can suddenly become problematic at an inopportune moment.

    You won't have those problems with CCC or SD.
     
  4. Hmac macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    May 30, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    #4
    Bootable backup. I am a great fan of Super Duper. Very simple, reliable, and automatic.

    I recently bought a second Mac Pro. I pulled the Super Duper backup drive out of the old machine, put it in the new one, held down the Option key at startup and booted from the Super Duper backup in the new machine. Then used Super Duper to copy that backup to the new machine's boot drive. Cloned drives are great.
     
  5. chipandegg thread starter macrumors regular

    chipandegg

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Location:
    London
    #5
    Thanks for all the answers everybody.

    I'm gonna go with bootable backup, might as well do it now than later! My idea is to back up the main system drive, as the the system drive is getting on a bit, so I'll clone it and then the bootable back will eventually become the main system drive (then I'll back that up too).

    You mentioned something about the holding down the option key at startup, does this give you an option of what drive to boot from?
     
  6. Hal Itosis macrumors 6502a

    Hal Itosis

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    #6
    Someone oughta mention that those two methods are not mutually exclusive. The option to have both programs (e.g., Time Machine and SuperDuper) use the same volume is also viable (and perhaps preferable). For total segregation, the backup disk could be partitioned... thus providing one volume for SD and one volume for TM. But if that approach seems too technical it can be avoided.
     
  7. Hmac macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    May 30, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    #7
    Yes, holding down the Option (ALT) key during the time of the startup chord will bring up a choice of all the bootable media on your system. In my case for example, it gives me "Macintosh HD", "System Backup", and "Windows". If I have a startup DVD in there like the Snow Leopard install disk, that one will come up as a possible boot choice too.
     
  8. aristobrat macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #8
    I totally agree. Each method has its advantages/disadvantages -- I don't see how anyone can say one of the two methods "wins hands down".

    By combining the two, you end up with overall more advantages and significantly less disadvantages.
     

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