Backing up to BD-R: Completely worth it

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by TheStrudel, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. TheStrudel macrumors 65816

    TheStrudel

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    #1
    I realize that this thread may be slightly out of place, as it could also fit in "Peripherals," or the photo/video threads, but this subforum is most likely to have viewers who will be interested in this.

    The relative merits of Blu-ray and associated elements have been discussed to death, but I thought it was worth describing my experience with my burner.

    I've got a few finished video editing projects sitting on my hard drive, small jobs I did for people and got paid for that I no longer need, but might want to keep around just in case. But there's no easy way to back-up to disc, and I want it available in the native edited form, aside from on tape, in case I ever need it later. I could potentially re-encode it.

    I got an LG-GGW-H20L for $205 on sale, and it came with a BD-RE. Using this, I was able to back up a project to disk by using Final Cut's Media Manager, exporting media and a project file to the disc, or alternatively to a burn folder, then using the finder's burn method to send it out. It worked more or less perfectly, though file names can't be too long or your media will become disconnected, as the end of the name will be garbled. I suppose there's a cap on file size name, which is reasonable. It's a disc, after all. But that said, it even reads/writes reasonably fast for what it is, and it turns out to be a much better long term solution for putting these projects. Now, discs at $3.60/disc at their cheapest are not exactly the easiest pill to swallow, but I can fit two one-hour SD projects on one disc, which is pretty handy.

    Blu-ray may not be the most popular thing in the world, but I've found its data capacity to make it an acceptable long-term back-up solution. Better than keeping it all on hard drives; even if HDDs are cheaper by the gig, failure rates, among other things, make their use as stored, semipermanent back-up impractical. $3.60 per disc is worth it, and they'll get cheaper.
     
  2. JesterJJZ macrumors 68020

    JesterJJZ

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    #2
    I used to think that. But honestly, Blu-Ray came a couple years too late for my needs. The average DV project with media would end up being small enough to fit on a single layer BDR, but since I've gone HD, backup to disc has become impractical. I usual a two drive bare SATA method. Keep two bare SATA drives of everything I backup and store. I can get 1TB drives for $90 now. As drives get larger I swap out my smaller drives for larger ones and my backup footprint stays pretty much the same. I've got two fireproof Turtle Cases that hold 10 drives inside. I feel this is much easier to manage than stacks of BluRay.

    Oh and you might want to make that $3.60x2 if you're smart. BluRay is no more bulletproof than any other means of storage.
     
  3. Matek macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    #3
    You're probably thinking "If I leave the bluray discs safely stored in a cabinet, nothing can happen, while a constantly-rotating hard drive can die", but that's a false feeling of security you shouldn't be fooled by. Just like CD's and DVD's, homemade bluray discs they will become useless in a few years (they slowly die on you).

    A harddrive is supposed to last much much longer, I understand you're worried about failures, but at the price you're buying bluray discs, you could buy more hard drives and put them in a raid array (raid1 or raid5), which means you'd be safe even if one of them fails. That would be infinitely safer than storing it on bluray discs, not to mention faster and more practical.
     
  4. OrangeSVTguy macrumors 601

    OrangeSVTguy

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Location:
    Northeastern Ohio
    #4
    Maybe UltraNeo* will respond. He uses BD to back up his files too or to transport the data to other clients. I think I remember him saying in another post that he burns over 50(?) BDs a day?

    He'll give you a better idea. You should burn 2 copies of your data and have them stored in different locations in case of a fire or flood.
     
  5. TheStrudel thread starter macrumors 65816

    TheStrudel

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    #5
    There's a question of organization and usage here as well. I wouldn't suggest that making one copy and leaving it aside is better, but I see this method as a better mode of operation than a stack of hard drives. As for a hard drive, I wouldn't bet on them lasting better over a 10-year span, especially if operation is frequent; if I'm backing up to the hard drive regularly, eventually it'll crap out (Sure, RAID1 or more elaborate strategies will continue to work, but you're driving up price and complication. And RAIDing doesn't solve the problem of backing up a back-up). Two hard drives, that is. As others have pointed out, it's also a better content delivery mechanism for clients than shipping a hard drive; I wouldn't want to ship a hard drive or transfer it back and forth every time I needed to send something.

    Backing up to BD, or BD-DL would still be effective for anything edited in HDV, AVC, or even ProRes or Apple Intermediate Codec, at least to a point.

    Of course, there's also the muffin of actual lengthy HD playback, to which BDs are definitely better-suited.

    Besides, prices are going to continue to drop. Unless flash memory prices drop to the point where we're putting everything on 16 GB SDHC (or SDXC, etc.) cards, optical media is not dying nearly as fast as pundits would have you believe, and it certainly won't be replaced by HDDs as a method of content delivery.
     
  6. galstaph macrumors 6502a

    galstaph

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    The Great White North Eh
    #6
    the longevity of the discs is determined by the organic dye and the method of storage. Under ideal conditions, using high quality media you can theoretically (lab conditions) get well over 50 years of storage reliability, heck MAM-A gold cd-r's are rated for 300 years and their DVD-R golds are rated for 100 years. I'm sure that they can figure out how to make a BD last longer than 2-5 years;)
     
  7. Rankrotten macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    Location:
    UK
    #7
  8. bearcatrp macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Location:
    Boon Docks USA
    #8
    Another option but pricey is MO (Magnito optical). Major newspapers and the military us it.
     
  9. akdj macrumors 65816

    akdj

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Location:
    Alaska
    #9
    We're getting to a point that SS is going to pass up the expense (or lack of) of discs. I saw 16gig thumb drives on sale the other day for 19.99! I know we can get 25gigs on a single side BD-R but the 32gig sticks should drop within 6 months. 64-128gig sticks in 12 months for the same price? 64gig sticks at New Egg are $135 =/- right now:)

    Jer
     
  10. OrangeSVTguy macrumors 601

    OrangeSVTguy

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Location:
    Northeastern Ohio
    #10
    Just imagine 3 years from now, 1TB USB 3.0 thumb drives for less than $100.
     

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