Banding on photo scans?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by M. Gustave, Dec 22, 2016.

  1. M. Gustave macrumors 68000

    M. Gustave

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    #1
    I thought maybe someone in this subforum might know what's going on here: my brand new Canon Lide 220 scanner is producing jpegs that look like this zoomed in:

    IMG_1129.jpg

    You see the light vertical bands?
    The source prints are glossy without texture. Resolution is set to 600dpi. The scanner is plugged into my laptop usb, only running on battery, so no external power to cause noise.

    Any idea? Thanks!
     
  2. JohnDS macrumors 65816

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    #2
    Are you scanning from a slide, a negative or a print?
     
  3. M. Gustave thread starter macrumors 68000

    M. Gustave

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    #3
    Print, as mentioned in my post. Thanks.
     
  4. JohnDS macrumors 65816

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    #4
    Oops! Sorry. Have you tried increasing the scanning bit depth in the software?
     
  5. M. Gustave thread starter macrumors 68000

    M. Gustave

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    #5
    Hmm, I don't see an option for that in the preset "Photo" mode I use, although it's set to high quality jpeg output.

    I did some more research today, and it may be that the scanner needs to be recalibrated. I ran the "platen calibration" in Scangear, but I haven't had a chance to test again yet. I'm hoping the calibration is all saved in the scanner, so it applies even in Photo mode.
     
  6. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    #6
    You mention on battery but have you also confirmed that it happens on external (wall) power as well?
     
  7. dwig macrumors 6502

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    #7
    Fine, but ...
    ... are the prints optically printed gelatin silver dye coupler prints or are they digital inkjet or dye-sub prints? Also, have you examined the prints with a high power loupe (~10-25x) to confirm that the banding is not an attribute of the print?

    I've seen many digital prints that have very slight banding that is all but invisible to the naked eye but shows under high magnification. This could be the cause of your problem if the "originals" are digital prints. Even digitally printed gelatin silver dye coupler prints (e.g "Fuji Crystal" prints) can exhibit banding under high magnification, though it is much less likely.

    Alternately, you could be encountering an alignment fault in the scanner or possibly the limit of the scanner's ability. I've seen the same type of banding in scans from a number of inexpensive scanners though I have no direct experinece with your particular Canon Lide scanner.
     
  8. M. Gustave thread starter macrumors 68000

    M. Gustave

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    #8
    They are 30 year old prints.
     
  9. phrehdd, Dec 24, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2016

    phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    #9
    What exactly is a "silver dye coupler" ?? Silver gelatin prints have no dyes so just trying to understand here, thanks. - Maybe its just a difference in terminology here.

    --- Post Merged, Dec 24, 2016 ---
    To the OP - what this print image stored in one of those albums that have those clear self sealing pages that are also tactile (holds the print somewhat in place)? Some of those types of albums have a not often noticed "ribbing" on the page and images stored on them can acquire that texture that might be somewhat exaggerated when a lighting source is at a given position. Though the latter is not likely to be the source, still worth checking out.

    Also - have you tried rotating the pic 90 degrees to scan and see if you have similar results? There are several things you can check to see whether it is in fact your scanner or the print itself (and possibly both as combination). While you are at it, maybe attempt to scan with a different software or driver and see if the problem persists and of course, check to see if it happens to other scanned subjects.
     
  10. dwig, Dec 24, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2016

    dwig macrumors 6502

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    #10
    "Gelatin silver" would be any photographic print that uses light sensitive silver compound(s) suspended in gelatin. "Gelatin silver dye coupler" prints (often shortened to just "dye coupler" prints) are similar but also have dyes that are coupled to the silver compounds and the processing removes all silver, both exposed and unexposed, and only the dye associated with either the exposed or the unexposed image. This later type is usually a color material, but that have been B&W materials using the technique so that they can be processed in the same chemistry as the color materials.

    These materials differ from the dye migration materials (e.g. Polaroid Land peel apart materials) and dye transfer prints where the print material never contained any light sensitive silver. The dye difussion materials (Polaroid Land SX-70, Time Zero, and T600 materials and Kodak' Instant Print Film) are another beast.
     
  11. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    Oct 25, 2008
    #11
    Thanks much, mea cupla I was thinking about deconstruction type colour prints such as cibachrome (with the bleaching process) rather than as Kodak refers to them as "C" prints (dye coupled). Thanks for the reminder and very much appreciate your patience with a well crafted explanation.
     

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