Battery capacity already dropped? :/

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Thalin, Oct 26, 2013.

  1. Thalin macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    #1
    I received a replacement early 2013 rMBP in late September, due to repeated repairs in my mid 2010 machine - one of the reasons I love Apple. I have been using my desktop machine for the past month or so, and was holding off opening up the new machine until I found out more about the new models. Anyway with no real changes in the new models I booted it all up for the first time, and it's a great machine.

    Anyway I checked Coconut battery straight away and it told me from the capacity was 100% as expected, with a charge cycle of 2, which I know is normal even for a new machine. I drained the charge that it had out the box, about 75%, until it turned itself off, then gave it a good 'first' charge from the evening into the morning, which was about 15 hours, even though it had finished charging by late evening. I checked Coconut battery again and it's telling me the capacity has already dropped to 98%, I check it 5 minutes later (now) and it's gone up to 99%, is this all normal? The loadcycles is still at 2, and the current charge is 85% in the app but 90% viewing it outside the app in the corner of the screen.

    I know the app is only estimating, was just concerned to see it drop after one charge?
     
  2. that1guyy macrumors 6502

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  3. actuallyinaus macrumors regular

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    Feb 13, 2013
    #3
    to get the most complete health information you have to perform a full power cycle
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #4
    It is perfectly normal if your battery health (maximum capacity) is more or less than 100%, even when brand new, or if it fluctuates up or down over time. The gradual decline is not in a straight line downward, and it may decline more rapidly at some times and slower at others. For further details, read the CHECKING STATUS AND HEALTH section of the following link.
    The link below should answer most, if not all, of your battery/charging questions. If you haven't already done so, I highly recommend you take the time to read it.
    Not true. The batteries do not require "conditioning" or calibration.
     
  5. actuallyinaus macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2013
    #5
    turns out you are correct, http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1490

    "The battery has an internal microprocessor that provides an estimate of the amount of energy in the battery as it charges and discharges."

    as far as i was aware the microprocessor can not provide the most accurate estimate unless a full discharge, charge cycle has occurred - as only through a full cycle will the degradation/hardeneing in the chemical makeup be detectable

    but i guess if the apple article says there is no need either i am wrong or the % incorrectness must be imperceptable
     
  6. ioannis2005gr macrumors 6502

    ioannis2005gr

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    Europe
    #6
    There isn't answer for this question:
    How long does a 13'' rMBP (i5) battery last under normal use, charging cycles and weather conditions? Can it last 2-3 years before exhausted? or more?
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #7
    Yes, it can last that long or longer.
     
  8. actuallyinaus macrumors regular

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    Feb 13, 2013
    #8
    "The built-in battery of your MacBook Pro or MacBook Air is designed to deliver up to 1,000 full charge and discharge cycles before it reaches 80 per cent of its original capacity."

    http://www.apple.com/au/batteries/notebooks.html

    that's a lot of charge cycles, so once you get a feel for how many charge cycles you use on average you could aproximate how long the battery will last you

    but if a battery replacement only cots $200, who cares that much

    also i think apple will replace you battery for free if it gets below 80% at 500 charges or something, though im not entirely sure on this so look it up
     
  9. ioannis2005gr macrumors 6502

    ioannis2005gr

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    #9
    you can remove battery from an laptop when you are connected to AC power.

    can I isolate MBA or rMBP battery (somehow) when I am on AC power?
    APPLE Care supports battery replacement?

    ----------

    Thank you!

    Can I isolate MBA or rMBP battery when I run on AC?
    Can I buy and replace a MBA or rMBP battery by myself?
     
  10. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #10
    It is not recommended to remove the battery when on AC power. Performance will suffer, as well as the risk of losing data for correcting files if the power cord is pulled. The built-in batteries are not a user serviceable item, and should be replaced by Apple, to avoid avoiding your warranty. AppleCare covers replacement of defective batteries. It does not cover replacement of batteries that are simply depleted through normal use. Read the Apple Notebook Battery FAQ that I posted earlier for answers to these and other questions.
     
  11. Thalin thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 30, 2010
    #11
    OK thanks for the advice.

    In terms of laptop usage, should I be keeping it plugged in when i'm using it as more of a desktop? I know there's a lot of debate about this. I just want to keep it all in tip-top shape, I have a case for it for protection, i'm keeping any grubby fingers away from it (not like my last one - I was always eating a load of bread and then typing away on the keys - not good!) and I want to do my best to give the battery a good life too.

    I've drained and recharged the battery fully three times now. I know it's probably not necessary these days but I know i've read many times this is a good idea with iPhones and new devices in general. I just want to know where to go from here. At the moment it's fully charged and i'm using it plugged in, I can't see any reason to unplug it as i'm near the power supply anyway /end paranoia
     
  12. joe-h2o macrumors 6502a

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    #12
    The days of having to unplug the battery when it's not actively in use to prolong its life are long over. Modern lithium ion cells are controlled by a little microcomputer of their own that manage the charging and discharging. It's not necessary to micromanage them yourself to extend their life.

    You also don't need to calibrate them any more with a full cycle every so often - the controller knows how the battery is doing more than adequately from a normal use profile.
     
  13. ioannis2005gr, Oct 27, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2013

    ioannis2005gr macrumors 6502

    ioannis2005gr

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    #13
    I want to use a new MBA or rMBP "on battery" as much as I can without charging it very often. I will avoid charge it unless battery level is very low (5-10%).

    Besides, I don't want to run on AC for a long time because this affects battery life....unless I can remove it...



    ----------

    Thank you!

    Also, battery life limit depends on charging cycles....if the limit is 1000 cycles (before it reaches 80 per cent of its original capacity) and I manage to reach it after a couple of years, will APPLE replace it at no additional cost (APPLE CARE)?
     
  14. joe-h2o macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 24, 2012
    #14
    This not true. Battery life on modern lithium cells is not affected by leaving it plugged in.
     
  15. ioannis2005gr macrumors 6502

    ioannis2005gr

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    #15
    Maybe!

    but I think when you run on AC your battery is getting hotter and this ruins your battery life...correct?
     
  16. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #16
    No, running on AC power does not make the battery hotter, unless it's charging. Even then, the temps are not sufficient to make a measurable difference in battery life.
    Run on battery whenever you need to and plug it in whenever you can. You can plug or unplug any time you need to, regardless of the charged percentage, and you never need to completely drain your battery. Just make sure you don't run on AC power exclusively, as your battery needs to be used regularly to stay healthy.
    The link below should answer most, if not all, of your battery/charging questions. If you haven't already done so, I highly recommend you take the time to read it.
     
  17. Thalin thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 30, 2010
    #17
    OK that's great. So have no worries keeping it plugged in like a desktop replacement, but remember to use it from the battery at times to keep it active. And don't worry what stage you plug it in, remove it, disconnect it while it's still charging etc.
     
  18. ioannis2005gr macrumors 6502

    ioannis2005gr

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    #18
    I will do so,
    thanks! ;)
     
  19. Böhme417 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    #19
    That's a big fat no. I just replaced the battery on my MBP. It only had 397 cycles but was at 67% and not even holding a charge that well. I asked about it since it obviously hadn't reached the 1000 cycles or 5 year lifespan talked about on Apple's website before falling below 80%. The "genius" told me it didn't matter, because my computer was out of warranty and the battery only had the same warranty.
     

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