Battery Design Capacity 29%?

Discussion in 'iPhone Tips, Help and Troubleshooting' started by davidg4781, Dec 30, 2016.

  1. davidg4781 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2006
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    Alice, TX
    #1
    I made a thread a while back when my batter was at 82%. Now it's at 29%. Does this sound like it would get covered by AppleCare+?

    I could give them a call but driving to the store is about 3 hours away. That's a bit of a drive to be told too bad. Is the information from CoconutBattery the same Apple would see?
     

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  2. chscag macrumors 68000

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    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    #2
    Apple will use their own diagnostic software to determine if your battery is failing. And since their diagnostic software is proprietary, I have no idea if it looks or acts like CoconutBattery. However, it does appear from your screen shot of CoconutBattery that your battery should be replaced. Apple charges a flat rate of $79.00 to replace the battery. You could do it yourself for less and save the 3 hour drive.
     
  3. davidg4781 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    Alice, TX
    #3
    Would I get charged that if I have AppleCare? I should've called today while driving. Totally got distracted. It would be a few weeks before I could go anyway.
     
  4. 89007132, Dec 30, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2016

    89007132 macrumors member

    89007132

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2015
    #4
    Apple will replace the battery at no cost under the AppleCare+ warranty, even if the battery has simply become consumed from normal use.

    http://www.apple.com/support/products/iphone.html

    At the bottom of the page:
    1. Service coverage is available only for iPhone and its original included accessories that are defective in materials or workmanship or for batteries that retain less than 80 percent of their original capacity. The replacement equipment that Apple provides as part of the repair or replacement service may be new or equivalent to new in both performance and reliability. See terms at www.apple.com/legal/sales-support/applecare/applecareplus/ for full details."

    EDIT: I would also suggest downloading the Apple Support App and doing a chat with an AppleCare rep. They should be able to run remote diagnostics on your phone's battery and tell you for sure if your battery has actually become consumed/failed. If your battery is not actually below 80% when they run diagnostics at the store, they may just suggest to restore the phone or charge you the $79 battery replacement fee if you insist on the battery being changed. You might save yourself a trip if you confirm with Apple the cause of your battery issues ahead of time.
     
  5. chscag macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
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    Fort Worth, Texas
    #5
    If you purchased AppleCare + and your iPhone is still covered, you will not be charged. Since you're three hours away from an Apple Store, is there an authorized Apple repair facility near by that you could use instead?
     
  6. davidg4781 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    Alice, TX
    #6
    I called up Apple and let them know what was going on (I just read this thread so I didn't know about the app). They had me start a diagnostic thing with them and they asked me a bunch of questions. They didn't tell me I was below 80% outright but said I had over 800 cycles. I told them I had used CoocnutBattery and saw I had 29%, and said you've probably never heard of that app. She said absolutely never heard of it... thought that was funny.

    In the end they authorized a replacement. They said they could send me the replacement but would need to put a hold on my card or I could go to the Apple Store. I chose the Apple Store, a friend asked me to take her mom's iPad too (something with the power button or whatever).

    They also looked for an authorized repair place near me. Apple Store is closer.
     
  7. 89007132 macrumors member

    89007132

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2015
    #7
    800 charge cycles is a good life span for a battery. They tend to get up to 600 cycles before they need to be replaced.

    Make sure you make a second reservation for the iPad, because the reservations are suppose to be 1 device per reservation and the Genius that helps you with your phone may decline to look at the iPad without another reservation for it. They run on a tight schedule and any delay in one of their appointments can make them fall behind on other people they are suppose to be helping.

    Also make sure your friend turns FMI off from the iCloud settings. It will be unserviceable with that on.
     
  8. davidg4781 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    #8
    I'll definitely make sure to make 2 appointments. I want to make them as early as possible so I won't waste my time going over there.

    And the service lady said it should be 1,000 cycles to 80% capacity.
    --- Post Merged, Dec 30, 2016 ---
    Well never mind. This says 80% at 500 cycles. http://www.apple.com/batteries/service-and-recycling/

    And someone else somewhere linked a site to help with battery usage. Most of it was turning things off but one page said Apple recommends to calibrate it once a month by allowing it to fully use all the battery then charge it back to 100%. I cannot find any such thing on Apple's site. It's even hard to find where to calibrate MacBook batteries. Maybe they don't need calibrating anymore?
     
  9. 89007132 macrumors member

    89007132

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2015
    #9
    It can definitely be helpful to "calibrate" the battery every now and then, but I don't think it is as needed as it once may have been. Good battery life is all about usage and how you charge the phone.

    For example: It should be charged to 100% in one sitting whenever possible instead of charging it in short intervals throughout the day. Only charge it with an Apple lightning cord or high quality third party cable. Generally charging the device slowly means the battery will also drain slower, so stick with the 5w adapter that came with the phone and avoid charging in the car or other adapters that push a higher current to the phone.

    Check the battery usage settings every now and then to get a better understanding of what is taking up the phone's charge. Settings that tend to effect battery drain the most are: background app refresh, auto-lock, and location services. Apps that tend to take the most battery are games and social media apps like Facebook and Snapchat.
     
  10. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #10
    Where does some of that information come from, like charming to 100% in one sitting, or charging slower means slower discharge? Lithium ion can be charged at different intervals with the battery actually being best in the 40-80% range, so while charging to 100% is certainly fine and good, it doesn't hurt not charging to 100% in one shot all the time (and can theoretically be better). As for slower charging, there's something to faster charging heating up the battery a bit more which can be a bit worse for it, but the phones regulate how much current they can take in, so there's not much of a concern there in that respect. Also rate of discharge would mostly depend on usage and environment/condistioms diring disharge, not really on the charging itself.
     
  11. davidg4781 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    Oct 28, 2006
    Location:
    Alice, TX
    #11
    Just an update. I took it to Apple on Friday and they replaced it under AppleCare+. I saw the screen when they did the diagnostic and it was right above the red, but still in the green. When I called AppleCare they said they put in my notes to replace the battery.
     

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