Battery technology

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by Tech198, May 3, 2014.

  1. Tech198, May 3, 2014
    Last edited: May 3, 2014

    Tech198 macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #1
    In reference to this, why does Apple think that constantly discharge/charging of a Lithium-ion batteries maintains maximum performance ?

    Even though the first few change/discharges cycles could increase it, the rest is not rquired.

    Apple just wants you to think that.

    Almost other manufactures who all say the same, those in the know, know that these batteries have protective circuitry to prevent such over-charging.

    Since Apple never mentions anything about protective circuity in their Lithium-ion batteries, this can only conclude that Apple want you to reach x number of cycles quicker, thus Apple gets more money because the battery will die quicker, thus need replacement sooner.

    Either that or Apple's battles doesn't have any protective circuitry, which would be dangerous.

    Even though all batteries die eventually, Lithium-ion isn't exactly old technology, i don't think Apple understands that. Or they do, just choose to keep it secret.
     
  2. quagmire macrumors 603

    quagmire

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    #2
    The once a month drain and recharge isn't for the batteries sake. It's to keep the battery life software calibrated and fairly accurate to what is actually left in the battery.

    Though I admit, I don't do it.
     
  3. chown33, May 3, 2014
    Last edited: May 3, 2014

    chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #3
    If you drain a batter monthly, then after 5 years you've added 60 cycles to the cycle count:
    5 years * 12 months = 60

    The typical cycle lifetime of a battery these days is over 1000 cycles.

    So 60 monthly drains have reduced the lifetime of the battery by less than 1% 6%.
     
  4. Tech198 thread starter macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #4
    I'll admit, neuther do I, but i will admit keey mine plugged in always around power, even if its fully charged. Where as Apple having us all disconnect to drain, then recinnect as "good practice", while all the time under our noses, where wasting cycles. Which isn't neccessery at all.

    The only it it extends is your wallet when you must buy a new one after 6-12 months when it reaches 1000 cycles depends how mich you use it.

    I would like to see if these batteries will last longer if fully stayed attached to power whenever possible instad of constantly letting them run down after a charge is complete.
     
  5. quagmire, May 3, 2014
    Last edited: May 3, 2014

    quagmire macrumors 603

    quagmire

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    #5
    Lithium Ion batteries degrade no matter what over time. If you keep them charged or not. And as explained, it's not that big of a factor in the long term in terms of durability by doing it once a month.

    Doing it often is bad for the battery don't get me wrong as 0-100% is harsh on it. But, once a month to keep the software calibrated won't drastically hurt battery endurance.
     
  6. chown33, May 3, 2014
    Last edited: May 3, 2014

    chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #6
    A monthly drain for 12 months is 12 cycles. That's exactly 1.2% of 1000 cycles.

    If your battery is failing after 12 months, it's not because you put an extra 12 cycles on it.

    FWIW, the longest lifetime for Li+ batteries is to keep them at about 75% of full charge. Of course, this decreases the total amount of power you can pull from them, but for battery-backed equipment in remote or difficult locations, it may be worth doing.

    "Constantly letting them run down" isn't even close to "drain once a month". If a full charge lasts one day, then the first is about 30 times greater than the second (about 30 days/month).

    No one requires you to do a monthly drain. So go ahead and keep it charged and see what happens. However, your results may not be typical. To get a valid statistical sample, you'd have to test a lot more than one battery.
     

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