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nightcap965

macrumors 6502a
Feb 11, 2004
726
863
Cape Cod
When I lived in the UK, I happily trudged to the post office and bought a TV license. Now that I live on the other side of the pond, I would happily pay the equivalent of a license fee to get BBC content.
 
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Sakurambo-kun

macrumors 6502a
Oct 30, 2015
572
672
UK
Disappointing that there are no settings available on the iPlayer app. However, I'm getting a really clear picture on The Hunt via Apple TV. On ITV Hub I can't watch some programmes as the quality is so poor. I'm on normal broadband.

It's 480p, not the standard 720p on every other iPlayer app. As is sadly always the case on the new ATV, we get the worst apps by far. Weird. Roku must be laughing.
 

Sakurambo-kun

macrumors 6502a
Oct 30, 2015
572
672
UK
I think what you're looking for is https://store.bbc.com/ - Allows you to buy a shedload of programmes from their back catalogue, many of which have never been released before.

There is a blog post on the BBC ATV app here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/internet/entries/b83f06a2-8552-47d3-b87a-2d883738d666

None of which will work on the ATV iPlayer app as it lacks BBC ID login.

Heck it doesn't even have a favourites option or HD streaming. Poor show from the BBC.
 

byke

macrumors 6502a
Mar 29, 2007
724
60
LDN. UK
That's not (quite) the problem. Like all broadcasters/CableCos some BBC shows are "imported" and the BBC only has the right to broadcast them in the UK so would get sued if they allowed iPlayer to work outside that region - a possible solution would be to region lock that content which they do not own worldwide rights to. With BBC-produced content, they have distribution agreements/their own channels outside the UK, sometimes subscription, so iPlayer outside the UK could be made open but the BBC would have to charge for it.


A good few shows are not allowed to be aired live on iPlayer.
In the past this has included dads army, a question of sport, Scott doo.... Just to name a few.
 

page3

macrumors 6502a
Feb 10, 2003
806
760
Outside the EU
Had chance to compare now, and whilst the Auntie Player was good, this is better. Ok, it might be missing some of the features found in other versions, but it does the basics very well. Quality is good too, so for v1.0 a few months after launch, I'd say it was a good start.
Agree. Whilst not perfect, it is a good start.

We really should be celebrating that iPlayer finally gets an official AppleTV version.
 

coffeemadmanUK

macrumors 6502a
Jan 30, 2012
575
212
United Kingdom
Has anyone else noticed that the app showing up without having to download it?
I went to download it but instead of the usual 'Get' it said 'Open', so I checked and the icon was already on my home screen.

Reckon Apple might be pushing it out to eligible (UK based) ATVs

It's a universal app. There aren't many of them. So it pushes to any iOS device that has an app available. This has happened on iOS for a while now.
 

MrSimmo

macrumors member
Oct 17, 2014
39
21
It's 480p, not the standard 720p on every other iPlayer app. As is sadly always the case on the new ATV, we get the worst apps by far. Weird. Roku must be laughing.

I was about to ask the same question, watched a couple of programme on it yesterday and the HD didn't seem very "HD";

So the app only works in Standard Definition?
 

nebo1ss

macrumors 68030
Jun 2, 2010
2,903
1,695
Absolutely. Especially if the EU decides to stop content blocking by Country, the iPlayer will have to move to a subscription based service. Other wise every EU country will gain free access to it without having to pay. A subscription service would potentially allow users to use the service anywhere in the world, not just the EU.
Don't think so the reasons why its not done today would not change by a subscription service.

1. The BBC makes programs that it sells to overseas networks. Making Iplayer available overseas would seriously affect their ability to market these programs in these markets.

2. The BBC buys program material from overseas markets and only buy the right to broadcast it in the UK. They would be in breach of their license if they made this material available on an player app overseas.
 

nebo1ss

macrumors 68030
Jun 2, 2010
2,903
1,695
NB: I think some non-UKians are misunderstanding on how iPlayer works: most programmes are only available on iPlayer for a week or two after they have been broadcast on BBC terrestrial TV. Its not a free, always-on back-catalogue of BBC shows. The BBC supplements the license fee income by selling DVD box sets, licensing material to cable/satellite/internet channels, even in the UK.

Even the BBCs own shows are often subject to contracts with production companies, actors, writers, composers etc. - often agreed in the pre-digital, if not the pre-VHS era for "classic" stuff.

Meanwhile - no sympathy from the UK until we can get Game of Thrones etc. without subscribing to Murdochvision or waiting a year for the Blu-ray.
This changed more than 18 months ago shows are now available for 30 days.
 

shorn

macrumors regular
Jun 29, 2010
206
16
I'm happy with it so far. Interface is nice. Content wise I wouldn't be watching a huge amount anyway, so it's got what I want.

Quality wise, I'm a bit unsure of though. Just watched MOTD2 and it was nice, clear definitely HD (although possibly not 1080p). Watched BBC2 live and that appeared to be in HD, but then switched to BBC One live and that was standard def. I've also found that on iPlayer on the XB1. I wonder if BBC One live is intentionally not in HD?
 

macfoxpro

macrumors 6502
May 17, 2011
499
400
USA
Now that I have a 4K TV, I totally understand the whine about Apple needing a 4K ATV. I don't care too much about this one anymore.
 

Sakurambo-kun

macrumors 6502a
Oct 30, 2015
572
672
UK
I'm happy with it so far. Interface is nice. Content wise I wouldn't be watching a huge amount anyway, so it's got what I want.

Quality wise, I'm a bit unsure of though. Just watched MOTD2 and it was nice, clear definitely HD (although possibly not 1080p). Watched BBC2 live and that appeared to be in HD, but then switched to BBC One live and that was standard def. I've also found that on iPlayer on the XB1. I wonder if BBC One live is intentionally not in HD?

It's 480p. Admittedly iPlayer is so over overcompressed the 480p stream doesn't always look that different to the 720p stream. I did a side by side of a few shows on PS4 iPlayer (which is 720p) vs the ATV iPlayer and the PS4 had fewer compression artefacts and sharp edges (such as text) resolved more cleanly. Both looked garbage though. Netflix and Amazon have rather spoilt me for streaming quality.
 
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MagnusVonMagnum

macrumors 603
Jun 18, 2007
5,193
1,442
Notably, VPNs are blocked, so this is strictly UK-only.

Wouldn't a subscription model for BBC programming outside the UK make a lot of sense? I don't find the programming on BBC America all that appealing. They even show US made shows like Star Trek TNG on there. WTF!? I want BRITISH programming! I love British comedies and frankly, I find a better selection on Netflix and YouTube than US Cable/Satellite/PBS.

It's sad people have to resort to VPN hacks to watch the BBC (which doesn't pay them a red cent, just the VPN provider). The question is why doesn't the BBC want more money coming in? They just lost Top Gear (the "real" version anyway) and so I think they could use some more revenue!
 

OllyW

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 11, 2005
17,196
6,800
The Black Country, England
The question is why doesn't the BBC want more money coming in? They just lost Top Gear (the "real" version anyway) and so I think they could use some more revenue!
I'm sure they would if it was simple but it's not a easy task to just offer iPlayer content throughout the world because of the complex licensing issues in different territories.
 

johngordon

macrumors 68000
Apr 19, 2004
1,731
956
That and the whole split between the licence funded BBC, and BBC Worldwide which presumably would look after that.

I and understand how it seems a bit bonkers to people outside the UK.

I can see it happening eventually though.
 
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shorn

macrumors regular
Jun 29, 2010
206
16
It's 480p. Admittedly iPlayer is so over overcompressed the 480p stream doesn't always look that different to the 720p stream. I did a side by side of a few shows on PS4 iPlayer (which is 720p) vs the ATV iPlayer and the PS4 had fewer compression artefacts and sharp edges (such as text) resolved more cleanly. Both looked garbage though. Netflix and Amazon have rather spoilt me for streaming quality.
Well the BBC two live stream is not 480p, it's most definitely HD. That's what seems strange?
 

Dunk the Lunk

macrumors regular
Oct 27, 2007
232
74
.uk
Don't think so the reasons why its not done today would not change by a subscription service.

1. The BBC makes programs that it sells to overseas networks. Making Iplayer available overseas would seriously affect their ability to market these programs in these markets.

2. The BBC buys program material from overseas markets and only buy the right to broadcast it in the UK. They would be in breach of their license if they made this material available on an player app overseas.


Except the EU is planning on removing content blocking by state, so forcing the BBCs hand...
 
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GreginNJ

macrumors member
Jun 4, 2015
37
18
Actually, they do. BBC Worldwide invest in programming and sell international rights. It's wholly owned by the BBC and any profits are returned to the BBC. Without BBC Worldwide, the licence fee would have to be a lot higher to return the same level of content it currently does.

The director general of the BBC has already announced plans for a subscription service in the USA and it's expected to launch next year.

Sign me up!
 

GreginNJ

macrumors member
Jun 4, 2015
37
18
It's not a ridiculous need.

If I purchase the rights to produce a British version of a Japanese TV format, and someone else purchased the rights to produce an American version of the same format, I would be very upset if the Americans made their version first and released it in the UK.

Also, if I managed to sell my version to an Australian broadcaster, they're not going to want everyone watching it online before they have had a chance to broadcast it.

BBC content is sold to broadcasters all around the world - from Korea to South Africa. If they make it available online, for free, then no international broadcasters will bother paying for it.

Those international sales are often needed to fund productions in the first place, or to generate an income for the production companies (usually not the BBC) in order to fund the development of new shows. The commercial reality of the situation is that without region blocking, you won't be able to watch those high quality shows, because no one will be able to afford to make them.

What about all the content that gets produced in Country A and never gets sold to broadcasters in Countries B thru Z? The only way the rest of the world could semi-legally view it would be to buy a region-free DVD or Blu-ray player and import the discs.

Right now, I have an Amazon.co.uk wish list of twenty plus titles of stuff that will never see the light of day on BBC America or get a region A/1 release that I won't be able to watch until I get a region-free Blu-ray or DVD player. Yes, I could use a VPN or pirate what I want, but I'm not going to.

There's got to be be a way they can make this work.
 
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wikiverse

macrumors 6502a
Sep 13, 2012
691
958
What about all the content that gets produced in Country A and never gets sold to broadcasters in Countries B thru Z? The only way the rest of the world could semi-legally view it would be to buy a region-free DVD or Blu-ray player and import the discs.

Right now, I have an Amazon.co.uk wish list of twenty plus titles of stuff that will never see the light of day on BBC America or get a region A/1 release that I won't be able to watch until I get a region-free Blu-ray or DVD player. Yes, I could use a VPN or pirate what I want, but I'm not going to.

There's got to be be a way they can make this work.

Most shows do get sold into every region - usually on cable, or on streaming services. You just need to a) Wait, and b) subscribe to that particular service.
 

Reason077

macrumors 68040
Aug 14, 2007
3,643
3,700
Its your TV, not your Apple TV thats the problem.

Turn off overscan in your TV settings and suddenly all your video will be in the correct resolution. The difference is amazing. Currently everything you watch is zoomed with the edges cut off.

Thanks. I've looked through my TV's menus (its a 2014 LG Smart TV, model 42LB585V) but can't find any Overscan settings. I'll investigate further, though.

Just to be clear, it's only the Apple TV that is affected by this - the TV's built in apps all look perfect with no overscan.

I did a side by side of a few shows on PS4 iPlayer (which is 720p) vs the ATV iPlayer and the PS4 had fewer compression artefacts and sharp edges (such as text) resolved more cleanly. Both looked garbage though.

Yes, comparing the LG iPlayer app and the Apple TV iPlayer app, it's clear that the LG has much, much better quality. At least the same quality you get when viewing iPlayer on the web with the "HD" setting.

The Apple TV however only seems to play the standard, SD stream.
 
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davidoloan

Suspended
Apr 28, 2009
419
72
Thanks. I've looked through my TV's menus (its a 2014 LG Smart TV, model 42LB585V) but can't find any Overscan settings. I'll investigate further, though.

Just to be clear, it's only the Apple TV that is affected by this - the TV's built in apps all look perfect with no overscan.

Are you sure its only the Apple TV? Most logos placed on video are positioned taking into account that most TVs have some form of zoom turned on. So you won't necessarily notice anything wrong but you will notice an improvement in the image when you turn it off.

On the new Apple TV4 there is a test page now in the settings so you can see if Overscan is turned on. There is an outer perimeter which may not be visible if it is turned on and a circle which may not be a perfect circle.

I suspect the BBC iPlayer team put their logo so close to the edge because they know people have been using airplay from ios for several years and they want to make it obvious that something is wrong. If the BBC put their logo an inch in and an inch down you might never notice your image was zoomed.

Overscan has a lot of names. Sometimes to turn it off you have to select "PC input" or something similar to select the 16:9 standard size. John Siracusa says in his article "It may be called “Overscan,” “1:1 Pixel Mapping,” “Native,” “Screen Fit,” “Just Scan,” or something even more generic like “Size 1” or “Size 2.”

Other names are "Full," "Fit" or "Dot by Dot." You can google for plenty more.
 
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