Become a Mac IT specialist?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by FF_productions, Feb 28, 2009.

  1. FF_productions macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Mt. Prospect, Illinois
    #1
    How the heck do I word this question...

    Basically, I'm trying to figure out my career, and thought about doing something in the IT field, dealing with servers etc. I obviously have not done enough research, but is there anyway to get a degree specializing on the OS X side of computers, and not Windows? I know I'm missing a HUGE market, but I figure with Macs going on the upside, there has to be a demand of some kind for that.

    I know certifications are all around, but I'd like to get a degree in hand. (UNIX?)

    Be gentle, this is something I've just started researching, any advice would be great.
     
  2. Peace macrumors P6

    Peace

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    Location:
    Space--The ONLY Frontier
    #2
    You can get a degree in Systems Engineering that's a sub-part of electrical engineering I think. At least if you're talking Doctorate.
     
  3. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #3
    Mac market share is up, but is Mac server market share up? Is there even much of a market for Mac servers? What I mean is, are there many people who buy Mac servers without a maintenance contract?
     
  4. FF_productions thread starter macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Mt. Prospect, Illinois
    #4
    I'm thinking some sort of bachelor's degree, from there I'll snatch up some certifications hopefully.

    Like I said, I'm not exactly sure how to word it, like a person that maintains computers at a K-12 school full of Macs, that's a job right there.
     
  5. shfreelance macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 24, 2008
    Location:
    Eustis, FL
    #5
    The first things I would do is. Get my CompTia A+ and Net+ Certifcations, more of a general certificates, but lets people know you have the basics down. Plus being that Mac community is still some what small, in most communities. You can still do work fixing windows computers and setting up small networks. But an Apple Specific certification would be, http://training.apple.com/certification/

    Edit: After I am out of the Military, I plain to major in Computer Engineering and Technology.
     
  6. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #6
    My wife does that for two schools, and those positions require a teaching degree and certification. As far as her school district is concerned, that's a teaching position.

    And yes, they have to have IT training in addition to their teaching credentials, and keep them both maintained.
     
  7. FF_productions thread starter macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Mt. Prospect, Illinois
    #7
    Interesting, but I figure some schools you don't have to have teacher credentials right?
     
  8. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #8
    I've maintained Macs and done general repair without any credentials or certifications. Then again my résumé, job experience, and word of mouth from my superiors doesn't hurt either.
     
  9. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #9
    You might have more luck doing something like this in either an office or perhaps a college setting - but even then, chances are good that you don't start off doing what you're describing from day one unless you already have a good deal of documented experience under your belt.

    In my wife's case, she spent 10 years as a kindergarten teacher, the last five of those teaching other teachers various technology issues (like PowerPoint, web design, electronic grading systems, etc.) and maintaining her school's website. My point is that in all probability the position you've described is one you would have to "grow into," in a sense. Just like any other field, if you think about it.

    It's a great field to get into, I think, and I wish you the best :)
    My advice would to be to seek some of the certifications others have mentioned in this thread, since things like that on your résumé are going to be what get you in the door and up the ladder faster. Also, there's no substitute for practice - and by that I mean try to take on plenty of volunteer tasks that get you some hands-on experience, since there's no better way to learn than to teach.
     
  10. FF_productions thread starter macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Mt. Prospect, Illinois
    #10
    Yeah I threw K-12 schools out there just to get the point across of what kind of work I'm talking. I understand it's a thing you grow into just like any other career, nobody is gonna toss you the keys from the get go.

    Thanks for the help so far.

    As far as college degrees go, which one would be closest in relation to what I'm trying to do? I sound like such a fanboy/ignorant person, but I really would like to focus on the Mac side of things.
     
  11. marbles macrumors 68000

    marbles

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Location:
    EU mostly
    #12
    Once you have the basics down in all platforms you could specialize in Mac and then go self employed or approach Apple themselves
     
  12. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2005
    Location:
    Right side of wrong
    #13
    i hate to tell you this, but i don't think there are any "mac" degrees. i wanted a job just like you said, and applied for them when i graduated, but everyone wanted certs and experience.

    i have a Computer Information Systems degree. basically computers and business degree. check it out. but again, it's not related to macs.

    my advice is that you will have to learn more about windows and unix servers to do what you want to do. especially unix
     
  13. FF_productions thread starter macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Mt. Prospect, Illinois
    #14
    I expected to hear that, i was pretty sure there wasn't any Mac-type degrees..that kinda nails the coffin shut for that one.

    Guess I can't run from windows haha.

    Thanks again for the advice everybody
     
  14. marbles macrumors 68000

    marbles

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Location:
    EU mostly
    #15
    Good interesting thread actually , I've really enjoyed reading about all this.

    In fact it has ignited an amount of enthusiasm for the subject myself.
     
  15. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #16
    I have an Information Systems degree as well, and it's frustrating how many people believe Information Systems = Information Technology. They're actually different enough that one is in the Business department and one is in the Computer Science department.

    I.T. is technology infrastructure. I.S. is how you manage data. Or, put more simply, one helps you to succeed as a network specialist, one helps you to succeed as a database administrator or information manager.
     
  16. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2005
    Location:
    Right side of wrong
    #17
    but don't give up. sure, you can't run from windows, but you can get that job at a school administrating macs (and pcs). windows isn't all that bad, as long as you have macs in there as well.

    you are correct. i was actually a collegiate athlete, and my athletic adviser basically told me "we don't need computer science majors in our athletic department, why don't you try CIS instead, so you won't have to deal with the physics and calculus".

    ok, so maybe i added a little at the beginning there, but that was clearly implied as what she meant. they are judged on the overall gpa of all the athletes.

    anyways, back on topic. so yeah, with my CIS degree, i am about to start a logistics job for the army on monday (just a little nervous). which has nothing to do with CIS or IT. at least i don't think.
     
  17. r1ch4rd macrumors 6502a

    r1ch4rd

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    #18
    I never touched a Windows machine throughout my entire degree (Computer Science), never used a Mac either though.

    I would advise taking a course that isn't hung up on a particular operating system though. It's all about learning the theories behind what you are doing. Once you have that down you can do some Mac specific certifications afterwards. If the Mac stuff doesn't work out for you, because you weren't so specific when you started, you can do some certs for Windows or Unix later on.
     
  18. FF_productions thread starter macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Mt. Prospect, Illinois
    #19
    Very interesting stuff, I gotta do some more research.
     
  19. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2005
    Location:
    Right side of wrong
    #20
    let us know how it goes. and good luck! :)
     
  20. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #21
    Why would you be studying CS if you're going to work in hardware again?
     
  21. Sesshi macrumors G3

    Sesshi

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Location:
    One Nation Under Gordon
    #22
    "Mac IT specialist"

    From what I've seen of Apple Certified Consultants, the above seems to be an oxymoron. It might not be the best of long-term career paths. Best to be an IT specialist, whatever that is these days.
     
  22. FF_productions thread starter macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Mt. Prospect, Illinois
    #23
    Ha yeah Mac and IT don't usually go together, I figured there was some form of career path but specializing in Macs.
     
  23. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #24
    If you're very lucky you might end up Macintosh administrator at a university like a few friends of mine but that's very rare.
     
  24. FF_productions thread starter macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Mt. Prospect, Illinois
    #25
    Isn't there a ladder of some sort to get to that point?

    Like my rough unplanned timeline is:

    Degree->Certifications->Little Job->Bigger Job->Bigger Job->Decent Job and on and on.
     

Share This Page