Before I graduate and lose my discount (long)

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Architect4122, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. Architect4122 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    #1
    ...I think I'm going to invest in a MacPro. [in January after Apple typically announces new hardware]

    (I render, I use Aperture, Adobe's full design suite, modeling programs, I love Mail, and OSX...I would use it to its fullest extent)

    With that out of the way here is where the fun begins:

    + Mac Pro allows for 4 internal HDD bays.
    + There is dual gigabit network plugs on the back
    + There are dual FW800 plugs on the back as well


    Considerations and Questions:

    + I would consider a SSD (maybe two depending on size [raid 0?])
    + SSD for OS (OSX and Win7) and main apps
    + I would need back up/raid solution
    + can you use NAS through Network/gigabit cable and achieve faster throughput than FW800.
    + Should I keep main files on comp and put media/etc. on external?
    + I would like to keep most things internal
    + Have back up (time machine) as an external device?
    + Raid 5 would eliminate more or less back up. would be an alternative "continuous" back-up solution to TM. (I would still make hard copies periodically [HDD or DVD])
    + should I raid 0 most of the internal drives and back up externally?
    + Should I Raid 0 two small SSD for OS and Apps and Raid 0 two HDD for working files/documents and back up externally?


    What do you think would be a versatile set up. What would you recommend first as an internal solution, then what would you suggest as something that can expand externally.

    My friend recently pointed me towards this: http://www.econtechnologies.com/
    ...which I may use to keep my main working files on my laptop (MacBook Pro) and desktop (MacPro) synced so I can work at school and work, then when I come home I can sync and work on more intensive files on the desktop.

    This is aimed at those who find interest in these puzzles. Let me know what y'all come up with...and why you would do it this way.

    Thanks!
     
  2. maestro55 macrumors 68030

    maestro55

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2005
    Location:
    Goat Farm in Meridian, TX
    #2
    Are you implying that you believe having a RAID 5 array will eliminate your need to make back-ups? RAID 5 is great but it is no replacement for having your data securely backed up.
     
  3. bozz2006 macrumors 68030

    bozz2006

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2007
    Location:
    Minnesota
    #3
    One thing to consider is that I don't believe bootcamp can be set up with RAIDed SSDs. Someone correct me if that is incorrect info.
     
  4. Architect4122 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    #4
    Great!

    I know a lot or most of this, I'm really wanting people to weigh in with their thoughts and possibly narrow down a solid solution or two.

    I didn't even think of Windows not liking bootcamp+SSD in raid...thanks for bringing that up...something to look into, but I actually remembering reading some threads and responses regarding this: I think the common thing was it will not work....hmmm

    @maestro55: thanks for your response, I classify your response as pointing out non-clarity in my original request/post/question....I will edit my OP. But in response: yes, you are correct. I will always hard-copy back up periodically...I meant I would like to use RAID 5 as a continuous back-up over Time Machine (?).

    Thanks. Any other ideas, suggestions, designs, etc. ?
     
  5. gugucom macrumors 68020

    gugucom

    Joined:
    May 21, 2009
    Location:
    Munich, Germany
    #5
    I wonder why bootcamp Windows should not work on a Raid with multiple partitions. The RAID drive would have a standard GUID partition table, wouldn't it? I cannot see a reason why bootcamp would not install on that like it will on a third partition (counting the invisible EFI partition) of a single MB or MBP internal drive.

    The other issue is that in the presence of a Raid Windows will see all legacy SATA drives as external. You can sort that out by starting without RAID, installing AHCI drivers for the 4 standard SATA drives and the 2 ODD SATA drives. Thus having installed Windows without partitioning any hard drives you go back and re install your RAID. It is even possible to run the Windows disk from one of the ODD ports and have a 4 disk RAID.
     
  6. Dr.Pants macrumors 65816

    Dr.Pants

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    #6
    For Windows, a SSD is a modest idea - for OSX, however, I would state that it is overkill. Sleeping the computer (instead of shutdown), I think (somebody correct me if I am wrong) would keep the RAM from disappearing. OSX will store application files in the RAM, so the first launch is "slow" but the second, third, nth will be faster, unless a certain program eats RAM three meals a day, then the program will be loaded of the hard drive more often.[/quote]

    RAID means "Redundant Array of Independent Discs". RAID is all about redundancy - backup is about keeping your files in a completely separate place. I back up with older HDDs and put them in a Safe Deposit Box (What else am I using it for?)

    Yes, on Gigabit Ethernet. However, you will most likely need a RAID to fully utilise the performance, and then the RAID could be bottlenecked by a bus, potentially.

    If you do decide external, FW800 is the way to go; internal will generally be faster

    Its a sound idea, just when Time Machine updates it will be slower then usual. However, I'm certain you'll get blocks of time to do this.

    Read above. RAID-5 is meant for high-uptime computers, stuff that needs to run in the event of a failure (since I beleive RAID-5 can still run with one HDD gone). However, it has a "write hole" which can reduce performance, and on a rebuild one of the other drives might fail, and then the user is boned.

    Well... Bay 1 is the boot drive (any size or dimension); personally, I would not RAID-0 for a boot drive. Bays 2 and 3 are RAID-0'ed scratch disks, fairly large platter densities, and Bay 4 as a backup for the scratch disc, and external for the boot drive.
     
  7. Black107 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2009
    #7
    OP: my recommendation, if you want to buy a mac pro, and want the most discount you can get, but dont want to buy THIS SECOND is to get a student ADC membership. Its $99 and it comes with one hardware discount (and a copy of leopard). The base 8-core nehalem is $3300 at the apple store, colleges sell it for ~$3000, the ADC price is $2700. So while you're paying $100, you're still saving $200 vs the standard edu discount.

    I got a student ADC membership the month that I graduated (you have to print out your class schedule and fax it in) and its valid for one year after signup.
     
  8. Luba macrumors 65816

    Luba

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2009
    #8
    For an ADC Select members are the hardware discounts better or the same as the ADC student? I am not a student so I would have to get the ADC Select at $500

     
  9. Mackilroy macrumors 68040

    Mackilroy

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2006
    #9
    They're the same.
     
  10. Architect4122 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
  11. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #11
    Here's what I'm doing:

    Mac Pro:
    - Dual X25M SSD's in software RAID0 for OSX/apps/user
    - Single X25M SSD for my active video/audio/image project (scratch)
    - 1TB WD Black (that came with the MP) for archiving project work, raw clips, FCS content, etc.

    My backup strategy hasn't been implemented yet (no project work started) but this will be what happens:

    - Active project work backed up daily to archival drive
    - Important Archival drive content backed up weekly to my HTPC (which is also my NAS)

    I was going to use my Time Capsule for backing up my system drive but I've found no reason to back up my system drive. Using MobileMe, I keep my MP synced with my MacBook Air (including personal files via iDisk) and regularly sync iTunes and iPhoto as well between the two machines so if I ever lost the system drive in one or the other, I could easily recover just by doing a re-install of OSX and using the transfer settings feature (which has blown me away with how well it works!).

    Sadly, due to the ridiculous QOS throttling on the TC drive, it's practically useless anyway. I use it for storing downloads that I may want to keep. I wish Apple would allow administrators to change the QOS settings!!! :mad:

    EDIT: I forgot to mention that I intend to install Win 7 on an old Raptor drive I have and mount it in the unused optical bay.

    Cheers :)
     

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