Best Alternative to AUTOCad?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by luis4life, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. luis4life macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    #1
    I use AutoCad on Windows to draw Kitchen hood instalation layout plans, I just got my first Apple Computer, a SR Macbook Pro that I payed for myself and I was wondering what a good Alternative to AutoCad would be. I Dont to run Windows on the Mac because I dont want to defeat my purpose of getting a Mac.

    So does anyone know?
     
  2. Slumbercub macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Location:
    Gloucester, England
    #2
    You have lots of choices ranging from full blown 3D enabled mechanical and architectural packages right down to sketch programs.

    Try here for a list of CAD apps for OS X:

    http://www.pure-mac.com/cad.html

    High Design would be my recommendation for the work you will use it for.
     
  3. luis4life thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    #3
    I Tried the Demo for High Design, and well that program is not what I'm looking for. It is hard to use compared to AutoCad. Well is there any other AutoCad program you can recomend me that doesnt suck? I hear good things about vectorworks. is it recommended?
     
  4. Slumbercub macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Location:
    Gloucester, England
    #4
    Vectorworks is excellent but even harder to use than HD as it is a full blown 3D package that works in hybrid 2D/3D mode. If you are an experienced Autocad user (which is a dreadful in my opinion by the way) you are going to find any new CAD software difficult to pick up. The basic concepts are the same, it is just the app specific way of doing things that needs to be mastered.

    Vectorworks would be a very good choice, ask Nemetschek for a demo, I am sure they would be happy to oblige. What is your budget by the way?
     
  5. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #5
    Hopefully as the market share shifts Autodesk will realize that in 2000 when they talked about a Mac version and then ditched it that it is now a very good idea to get crackin'!
     
  6. luis4life thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    #6
    Well Whatever it needs to be, Since it's a fairly recent company I think my boss pirated it. But I am fairly new to AutoCad and already got the basics covered of what i have to do. I dont believe it would be too hard for me to get the hang of any new CAD software. I like the fact that AutoCad has the angles and measurments already on the pointer when you make lines. I love the fact that you can just type measurements as you make the line. Those small features are what im really looking for.
     
  7. jamesybsu macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    #7
    At architecture school I have used many different programs - the problem is once you start using autoCAD its going to be hard to switch over to any other programs. If you are just worried about 2D - I have used PowerCAD which is a good program. If you maybe want to start looking at 3D to impress your clients even more , a great (and free) program is Sketchup. They are actually making it so when you draw it in 3D you can create plans in a matter of seconds by clicking one button. Just an idea, but thats the nice thing about the MBP, you can use windows to use autoCAD (just do it when no one is looking :)
     
  8. jamesybsu macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    #8
    also - i forgot some things. AutoCAD will soon be no more and will be turning into Autodesk Revit - a BIM modeling application here in a few years, so get ur copy of autoCAD soon ;) also sketchup is a very easy program to use if your not fimilar with it. Google now runs sketchup - so like you said things about kitchen plans - you can actually go their their "warehouse" and download 3d models of say Sub-Zero appliances and stick them in your 3d model without ever having to draw them. They also have settings that allow you to make the renderings look "sketchy" with extended lines, etc. hope that helps!
     
  9. luis4life thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    #9
    Well if what you said about Autocad and autodesk Revit is true how would that benefit AutoCAD or how would it not benefit it?
     
  10. iris_failsafe macrumors 6502

    iris_failsafe

    Joined:
    May 4, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #10
    know a lot or architech that have switched to ArchiCad from AutoCad, they said it was OK. Although they recommend you get some kind of introductory training so you earn were the stuff is.
    ArchiCad as far as I understnad can be used as a @D drafting porgramme but is a true 3D BIM

    You might want to check this website very helpful info and forums

    http://www.architosh.com


    Im sure they sell DVD or have classes
     
  11. theBB macrumors 68020

    theBB

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2006
  12. jamesybsu macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    #12
    well Autodesk owns AutoCAD - and they apparently see the industry going to BIM modeling (Building Information Modeling) where when you "draw" a wall, you automatically give it's characteristics, e.g. 10'-0" tall 8" CMU wall w/ 2 layers of gyp. By doing this - it automatically creates the wall for you, instead of you drawing the rectangle, then extruding it...so on so forth. As far as benefiting AutoCAD, I think it is more of a "upgrade" where you will still have the 2D function, but instead of the newer versions of AutoCAD 3D is like a second option, Revit will just combine them both. There are pluses and minuses about BIM - the nice thing is when you change the wall to say only one layer of gyp. board - it automatically changes everything from your 3d model to your 2d drawings. Howerver, there are downfalls too, including not all materials and curve functions don't always work.
     
  13. jamesybsu macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    #13

    SketchUP is not a BIM program - but more of a designer tool that - 1. is very easy to use and learn the basics and - 2. provides designers the ability to create a 3d "massing" model very quickly. Like the name says - it gives you a sketchy look - unlike high end rendering programs, but its not intended for that use. Like I said earlier, I know the Pro version of Sketchup comes with a program called "Layout" where you draw your 2D plan - again with the idea that it will be quick and easy. I have not had the time to use this program, as it is pretty new, but if it is anything like Sketchup, it should be quite easy to master within a matter of hours.
     
  14. Rend It macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2003
    Location:
    United States
    #14
    Vectorworks, Vectorworks, Vectorworks. Don't waste your time, just get it. It's cross-platform, has great export/import capabilities, and is among the easiest to learn to use of CAD platforms. I have very little CAD background, but I taught myself everything I need to know to make very intricate mechanical drawings, as well as models for CAM. If you are a student, it's downright cheap. If not, it's still inexpensive as CAD programs go.
     

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