Best anti virus software?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by act1980, Apr 19, 2010.

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  1. act1980 macrumors regular

    act1980

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    #1
    Hi,

    I have just switched to my very first MBP after being a PC user for many years.

    Could someone please recommend a decent anti virus software package for the Mac?

    Many thanks!:)
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #3
  3. Chupa Chupa macrumors G5

    Chupa Chupa

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    #4
    For the Mac just use common sense. This includes using a browser plugin like No Script that disables scripts and Flash unless you specifically alow it.
     
  4. limo79 macrumors regular

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    #5
    I am using freeware PC Tools iAntivirus - scanning is very fast due to virus definitions only for OSX (this is disadvantage in some cases i.e. if we use same external data on HDD connected to Mac and PC). What is more important OSX boot time is not affected like in other AV software i.e. Symantec Norton for Mac, Kaspersky for Mac or ESET NOD32 for Mac (this last is available for free as BETA). They also include virus definitions for OSX and Windows.
     
  5. harmonica01 macrumors 6502

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    #6
    If you are doing windows dual boot, however, yes you need to worry about viruses. Colleagues of mine like norton's dual boot coverage, protects in mac and pc operating systems adds security even to safari and firefox browser on both platforms and allegedly does not slow the computer down. Can buy from apple direct. I will likely be going this route when I load windows 7 on my new mbp this summer.
     
  6. doktordoris macrumors 6502a

    doktordoris

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    Mar 14, 2009
    #7
    I too have recently become a Mac user after many, many years of using IBM compat PCs, and although I found it hard to believe there is NO danger from viruses for Macs.

    Lets face it if an unknown program popped up and asked you to type in your admin password to allow it to install would you?

    So my advice is dont bother with AV software.

    doris
     
  7. act1980 thread starter macrumors regular

    act1980

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    Apr 18, 2010
    #8
    Wow, it's hard for me to get my head around the fact that there are hardly any risks. I've been a PC user all my life so this is very new to me.

    If I decided to use an AV software though, what would be the best one?

    Thanks! ;)
     
  8. Jaro65 macrumors 68040

    Jaro65

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    #9
    ^^^^^
    How about the one I use? It works great for me.

    Oh, wait, I don't use any. :)
     
  9. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #11
    Have you checked the link that was given to you in the first reply to your original post?

    As there are dozens of threads, the less than a dozen applications to "protect" you from non-exisitng viruses and from the less than two dozens of malware titles which you have to manually install (so no automatic and unknown installation in the background), are mentioned in those threads several times.

    I don't have any of that on my Macs (four since 2004) and have done many things to them, but never once I got hacked or installed malware, so I can't give you any names, just my experience.
     
  10. thegoldenmackid macrumors 604

    thegoldenmackid

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    #12
  11. jack99 macrumors member

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    Apr 22, 2010
    #13
    Quite a stimulating discussion here!


    As someone who's also migrating to a MBP for school, I agree with the skeptics here. Apple's market share is growing and though OS X's architecture is fundamentally different from Windows 7's, it's still completely possible to write malware and viruses for it. But it's also rather fortunate Snow Leopard is designed to take on a few flavors of malware.


    But as someone who's tackled a handful of viruses/malware in his lifetime, I'd still be careful. Difficult doesn't always mean impossible. It might just be a matter of time before we start seeing a wave of attempted attacks.
     
  12. 2contagious macrumors 6502a

    2contagious

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    #14
    After 5 years of using Macs (after switching from PC), I would say that the best anti virus software is none at all. Like someone already said, just use common sense :eek:
     
  13. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #15
    But it's not a virus. Maybe someday someone will write one, but for now and since the last ten years, there has been none.

    from the page you linked:

    This backdoor requires installation on a Mac*, which could be carried out via a Trojan horse, or by exploiting a vulnerability in a program that accesses the Internet (such as a web browser). While Intego has not found any instances of Macs being infected by this in the wild, the fact that this malware is being distributed on a number of forums shows that it will be accessible to a large number of malicious users who may attempt to use it to attack Macs.

    * a virus can do that for itself, it does not need user input
     
  14. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

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    #16
    Man can we please go one day on these boards without a new virus discussion...
     
  15. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #17
    A computer virus is a computer program that can copy itself and infect a computer. The term "virus" is also commonly but erroneously used to refer to other types of malware, adware, and spyware programs that do not have the reproductive ability.

    From Symantec:
    As of this time, there are NO viruses in the wild that affect current Mac OS X. In the past, there have been a few viruses that ran on older versions of the Mac operating system, but no longer.

    There are, as of this time, trojans that can affect Mac OS X, but these must be downloaded and installed by the user, which involves entering the user's administrator password. Trojans can easily be avoided by the user exercising common sense and caution when installing applications. A common source of trojans is pirated software, typically downloaded from bit torrent sites.

    Having virus protection software on your Mac is pointless, as far as protecting your Mac from viruses, since AV software can't detect a virus that doesn't exist. It is possible to have a file reside on your hard drive that contains a Windows virus, but since a Windows virus (program) can't run in native Mac OS X, it would be harmless to your Mac. Some choose to run AV on their Mac to scan for Windows viruses, so the Mac user can't pass a virus-infected file to a Windows user. In my opinion, a Windows user should be protected by their own AV software, so the burden of protection lies with the Windows user.
     
  16. ozreth macrumors 65816

    ozreth

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    #18
    Yeah like others have said, nothing much to worry about, just enjoy your mac :)
     
  17. Fry-man22 macrumors 6502

    Fry-man22

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    #19
    This thing called "OS X" is a great anti-virus package for the Mac. Just get that and you're set...
     
  18. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

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    Canada, eh?
    #20
    You're right in that there is nothing magical about the Mac platform that would mean viruses were impossible. One day, I'm sure, someone will figure it out.

    However, the fact remains that OS X has been out for 10 years already, and there have been zero viruses and only a handful of malware in the form of lame trojan horse apps and a few proof-of-concept exploits that have never found their way into the wild. I like those odds.

    So, FOR NOW, I don't feel any particular precaution is necessary. This is not to say it won't be different a few months or years from now, but so far, the track record is good...
     
  19. mdnz macrumors regular

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    #21
  20. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #22
    All that accomplished was redirecting to a different URL. That is NOT having your computer hacked and it is NOT a virus or malware. It was browser only and had no effect on the user's OS or data.
     
  21. jack99 macrumors member

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    Apr 22, 2010
    #23

    I'd take good care with that confident outlook. There isn't always a definitive continuity between the past and future.


    Take a look


    Take this source for what it's worth. I'm sure TrendLabs had an agenda in releasing notice of this incident. It seems to me malware attacks are on the rise.
     
  22. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

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    Oct 24, 2007
    #24
    Since when is reintroducing a payload from 2004 deemed "malware on the rise".

    How in the world would someone get ahold of an iPhoto installer from an illegitimate source in the first place, especially considering most users don't uninstall ilife when they first get their machine.

    Seems like PEBKAC to me.
     
  23. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #25
    That's a trojan, not a virus. As has been said repeatedly, there ARE trojans that can affect Mac OS X, but they require the user to install them. If you use common sense and only get software from reputable sources (rather than downloading torrents with pirated software), you have nothing to worry about.
     
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