Best canon for video around 1000$ +

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by backinblack875, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. backinblack875 macrumors 6502a

    backinblack875

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    USA
    #1
    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 5_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/534.46 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.1 Mobile/9B179 Safari/7534.48.3)

    I have a canon xsi but may be interested in getting a new camera soon and would like video on it as well. Pictures are more important but still want video. Best canon for around 1000+??
     
  2. pigbat macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    #2
    If you want a video option then I'd vote for the 60D. It's about $100 more than the T3i but I feel like the $100 is worth it for the few extra features.
     
  3. fs454 macrumors 65816

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    Dec 7, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles / Boston
    #3
    60D in that price range, but honestly, if you honor the "+" in your budget, try to find a used 5D Mark II. The market is great for buying right now as the Mark III was just announced.

    I'm selling mine for $1700 and as the year goes on they'll get a bit cheaper, and plus you can find one with a bit more shutter clicks on it than mine that may go under my price.


    Full frame sensors really are a night and day difference in photography. I've never had a camera resolve as much detail as my 5D has over the 3 years I've owned it. I shot a few weddings with it and then started using it almost solely for video work through college and you can't really do any better unless you get the 5D Mark III, or after that spend $15000+ on an F3 or a Canon C300. While some may argue for crop sensors, claiming that they're closer to Super35 film, but honestly I've put a lot of hours on a T2i, T3i, 7D, and 60D on set and they've never come close to the detail and unique look that the 5D has. We know now that the 5D is good enough for an Academy Award, and for full-release feature films. Act of Valor was shot on the 5D almost exclusively and is currently in theaters.

    All that said, if you want to stick close to $1000, pick up the 60D body and a 35mm prime lens. It'll still outperform any dedicated video camera in its price range and well beyond. And most importantly, care about the lenses you own. I would not recommend any of the cheap zooms or kit lenses that come with these cameras. Pick up a fast prime or two and you'll never look back.
     
  4. floh macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    Location:
    Stuttgart, Germany
    #4
    fs454 said something very true, which you might already know, but I want to repeat it: Get a good lens for your body! Rather spend a little less on the body and invest in a prime lens.

    Apart from that: You sound like you want the camera to be able to record video, but not really focus on that part. I can tell you: If you want some really professional looking videography (music videos, short films, etc.), a DSLR is a very nice way to go. However, if you just want to film some short clips and put them together for friends and if you don't really want to get deep into the filming business, DSLRs have some major disadvantages! The three most obvious ones are:

    1. There is no autofocus. Be aware that this camera is not point-and-shoot.

    2. The sound recording is bad. You will want an external mic or an additional audio recorder.

    3. DSLR chips have "rolling shutter" which means you should not move your camera too harshly to avoid strange chip artefacts.

    You can not just take a DSLR, know nothing about filming with it and point it at a scene. If you want that, you will be better off with a <300$ camcorder in addition. This will be point and shoot, it will have acceptable audio, autofocus and less rolling shutter. The main disadvantages are that is does not perform as brilliantly in low light and that you don't have the nice shallow depth of field. I have known many people who wanted to use their DSLR for movies and failed because they thought it would be as simple as using a camcorder.

    So: If you know all that and you know what you're doing, go for the T3i or the 60D with a nice lens. It will produce awesome looking videos. But if not, think about what I said and maybe getting a small HD camcorder for your purpose (I actually just got an additional Canon HF R26 for about 300$, although I have a DSLR, for exactly such purposes).
     
  5. backinblack875 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    backinblack875

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Location:
    USA
    #5
    thanks all, I'm gonna stick with pictures then hahah. Ill have an 1080p HD helmet cam i suppose that'll do fine. I'm not gonna get real into film business like you said, so might as well spend more on that.
     

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