Best paper to print images

longthizzz

macrumors regular
Original poster
Mar 1, 2011
148
4
I'm going frame a picture of something i found on the internet , can someone recommend me a good shinny gloss paper ?

* this maybe a newbie question , but this isn't my thing
 

chabig

macrumors 603
Sep 6, 2002
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You are overthinking this. Just go to an office supply store or art store and find something nice that works with your printer.
 

Apple fanboy

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 21, 2012
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I'm going frame a picture of something i found on the internet , can someone recommend me a good shinny gloss paper ?

* this maybe a newbie question , but this isn't my thing
I use the Tecco range of papers. The PUW285 Glossy Ultra white is good, but I prefer the PL285 Lutre paper.

http://www.tecco-photo.de/EN/produkte.php

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You are overthinking this. Just go to an office supply store or art store and find something nice that works with your printer.
Nope!
 

alphaod

macrumors Core
Feb 9, 2008
22,046
1,104
NYC
I use a Canon PRO-1 with their Luster paper. It's my favorite. And the printer is great too. It replaced my PIXMA Pro9000 which kind of broke.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
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An Island in the Salish Sea
I'm going frame a picture of something i found on the internet , can someone recommend me a good shinny gloss paper ?

* this maybe a newbie question , but this isn't my thing
Often the best glossy paper made by the printer manufacturer is the way to go as the colour profile for that paper is built into the printer. Second choice would be the store branded best quality glossy paper. The 'best quality' above simply means that paper makers rate their papers for office, consumer, professional, etc. Use the high quality rating. It may or may not actually make any difference - but it's the simple way to go - and you are doing only one print so you don't need to overthink this.

If you were going to be getting into printing multiple high quality images then there are some added considerations.

1) There are a lot choices for paper. Matte, Lustre, Glossy. Weights (how thick), whether the paper uses brighteners or not, etc. Art Stores often have sample packs - 2 sheets each of a dozen different kinds for instance. You can then try them all and see what you like. Once you have narrowed down the list you then try similar papers from other paper makers.

2) Colour profiles. As you get farther away from the papers that the printer already knows about, you will need to install ICC profiles for each paper you like to use. Not that hard to do, but it's fidgety. You also then start to think about some of the other printer settings, colour management settings, etc.

(Staying with paper made by the printer maker or the store branded papers bypasses the need to manage your colour, usually)

3) Unless you have permission you shouldn't be distributing online images. Printing one for yourself is one thing, but if you are distributing the images then you get into copyright issues.

Hope this helps...
 

Apple fanboy

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 21, 2012
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Behind the Lens, UK
Often the best glossy paper made by the printer manufacturer is the way to go as the colour profile for that paper is built into the printer. Second choice would be the store branded best quality glossy paper. The 'best quality' above simply means that paper makers rate their papers for office, consumer, professional, etc. Use the high quality rating. It may or may not actually make any difference - but it's the simple way to go - and you are doing only one print so you don't need to overthink this.

If you were going to be getting into printing multiple high quality images then there are some added considerations.

1) There are a lot choices for paper. Matte, Lustre, Glossy. Weights (how thick), whether the paper uses brighteners or not, etc. Art Stores often have sample packs - 2 sheets each of a dozen different kinds for instance. You can then try them all and see what you like. Once you have narrowed down the list you then try similar papers from other paper makers.

2) Colour profiles. As you get farther away from the papers that the printer already knows about, you will need to install ICC profiles for each paper you like to use. Not that hard to do, but it's fidgety. You also then start to think about some of the other printer settings, colour management settings, etc.

(Staying with paper made by the printer maker or the store branded papers bypasses the need to manage your colour, usually)

3) Unless you have permission you shouldn't be distributing online images. Printing one for yourself is one thing, but if you are distributing the images then you get into copyright issues.

Hope this helps...
Tecco have profiles you can download from there website which makes it pretty easy. Alternatively you can create your own if you have something like a ColorMunki Photo.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
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Tecco have profiles you can download from there website which makes it pretty easy. Alternatively you can create your own if you have something like a ColorMunki Photo.
In some circumstances your advice would be the way to go... and I assume that just about every paper maker will have colour profiles for their papers. The profiles I use have all been (relatively) easy to install too. But...I would recommend using the profiles only for people who are are serious about making prints of their images. In this case the OP wants to make a single print of an image they found on the internet. We don't even know if the image itself is colour correct. So I'm going to stick with my original advice. It's easy and cheap, and I did mention easy? And it will be good enough for the intended purpose.
 

AlaskaMoose

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Apr 26, 2008
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This cannot be understated. Printer paper or glossy paper is not universal, especially for inkjet printers. Papers are specific to a brand or type of printer.
That's because the printer has its own printing profiles for those papers. But if you buy paper from a paper manufacturer and use the profile for this paper to print the photo, then it will work fine. In general, the ultra-white (or ultra-bright) glossy papers work very well with my Pixma Pro9000 managing the colors and matching the Canon type II glossy paper profile.
 
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Tomorrow

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Mar 2, 2008
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That's because the printer has its own printing profiles for those papers. But if you buy paper from a paper manufacturer and use the profile for this paper to print the photo, then it will work fine. In general, the ultra-white (or ultra-white) glossy papers work very well with my Pixma Pro9000 managing the colors and matching the Canon type II glossy paper profile.
It's actually because the surface finish is compatible with certain inks and incompatible with others. I once tried printing onto HP Glossy paper with a Canon inkjet, and no matter which setting I chose, the ink just puddled on the paper (it wouldn't stick). It's like and oil and water thing.
 

AlaskaMoose

macrumors 68000
Apr 26, 2008
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It's actually because the surface finish is compatible with certain inks and incompatible with others. I once tried printing onto HP Glossy paper with a Canon inkjet, and no matter which setting I chose, the ink just puddled on the paper (it wouldn't stick). It's like and oil and water thing.
Did you download and use the printing profile for that paper?

For example, Canon provides a few ICC profiles:
http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/standard_display/3rd_party_papers

But lets say that I want to use a special paper from other than Canon for my Pixma Pro9000 Mark II printer; in this case Ilford paper:
http://www.ilford.com/printer-profile-list
 
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Jessica Lares

macrumors G3
Oct 31, 2009
9,199
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Near Dallas, Texas, USA
Does it have to be glossy? I second snberk103's advice that you might play with a few samples of each.

You are overthinking this. Just go to an office supply store or art store and find something nice that works with your printer.
It's not just about the "feel" of the paper. You don't want it to start fading or get stiff so you want to use proper acid-free papers/tapes/glue when working with photography and art.

BTW... Ilford went bust in 2013 apparently.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
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An Island in the Salish Sea
...
It's not just about the "feel" of the paper. You don't want it to start fading or get stiff so you want to use proper acid-free papers/tapes/glue when working with photography and art.

BTW... Ilford went bust in 2013 apparently.
Conservation matting and framing... a whole other ball game! But in this case I think the OP just wants to stick a nice picture on their wall, or perhaps to give it to a friend.

I looked up Ilford on Wikipedia - and it seems that, yes, the inkjet portion went bankrupt in 2013. For others who are reading this and are curious:
In 2004, the company went into receivership. The UK site was subject to a management buyout, which resulted in the formation of Harman technology Ltd in February 2005. The company, now traded as Ilford Photo, produces high quality monochrome photographic products. The Swiss part of the company was bought by the Oji Paper Company of Japan in July 2005 and by Paradigm Global Partners LLP in May 2010. It produced inkjet products and high quality colour photographic products under the name Ilford Imaging Switzerland GmbH before being declared bankrupt on December 9, 2013.
 

Apple fanboy

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 21, 2012
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Behind the Lens, UK
Conservation matting and framing... a whole other ball game! But in this case I think the OP just wants to stick a nice picture on their wall, or perhaps to give it to a friend.

I looked up Ilford on Wikipedia - and it seems that, yes, the inkjet portion went bankrupt in 2013. For others who are reading this and are curious:
Because basically photographers don't print enough. I know I don't.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
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An Island in the Salish Sea
Because basically photographers don't print enough. I know I don't.
I happen to be a printing photographer - I just closed a solo show of prints on Thursday; helped organize a group show that opened yesterday; after having two prints juried into a regional art show earlier this summer.

But there are lots of people who have 1000s of photos that never ever see life as a print. From the OPs original note, I can only deduce that they don't do a lot of printing … so the advice is geared to help keep it simple.
 

MacCruiskeen

macrumors 6502
Nov 9, 2011
321
5
Didn't Ilford go bust?
The Swiss company went bankrupt. The British manufacturer of Ilford papers and film (Harmon) is still doing well. It's confusing because when the original company went broke many years ago, the assets, including the name, were split in two.
 

MCAsan

macrumors 601
Jul 9, 2012
4,524
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Atlanta
If I were to pick my favorite brand of papers, it would be Moab. http://moabpaper.com

Moab part of the larger Legion Paper company. They make, or imp or (from UK and Japan), many different papers. For those papers they list the ICC profiles for major printers from Canon, Epson, and HP. http://moabpaper.com/icc-profiles-downloads/

Their site is a good education of the many types of papers available, their characteristics, and relative cost differences. When I am read to purchase paper, I do so via B&H in NY.
 

kallisti

macrumors 68000
Apr 22, 2003
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I'm going frame a picture of something i found on the internet , can someone recommend me a good shinny gloss paper ?

* this maybe a newbie question , but this isn't my thing


Another option would be to use an online printing service such as Bay Photo

They are very economical (for example an 8x10 on photo paper is $1.79), offer a wide range of print sizes, have a fast turn around time, and then you don't have to mess with color profiles at all. Since it doesn't sound like you do much printing, there is also a very good chance that their printers will produce a higher quality print than what you have at home, regardless of what paper you use.

I've used them for several color prints that I've framed and have been very pleased with the results.

Keep in mind that the size of the source file as well as the size of your intended print may limit your options. A small internet file isn't going to print well at even modest print sizes regardless of whether you do it yourself or send it off to a print service.
 
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mofunk

macrumors 68020
Aug 26, 2009
2,399
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Americas
HP Premium is great. I've used that to print with my Canon printer. Also, for quick and easy print, the paper that comes with Canon ink is good. They have held up pretty well.

I print also from the LR module if that helps. Increase the sharpener by +1 or 2.