Best process to get data transfered from old HD to new HDs?

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by DetroitMacJack, May 15, 2010.

  1. DetroitMacJack macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    #1
    Hi,

    I have 2 new HDs (each 1T) uninstalled, and I have my old HD (160 gigs) currently residing in one of the two slots in my G5. Any ideas on the best way/process to get the data transfered from the old HD to the new ones, leaving my two slots filled with the 2 new drives AND my data from the old HD transfered and intact, with a RAID0 setup?

    OR, are there any other suggestions on a good setup with the 2 new HDs??

    I'm open to suggestions.

    I always back-up on external HDs, so, is their a need for me to worry about setting up a RAID0??

    I'm doing video processing for DVD release.

    Should I just max out the 2x1T gig HDs and not worry about a HD failure??

    All Suggestions welcomed!!

    Thanks, Jack


    FROM THE CUTTERMAN:

    You are limited with only 2 drive slots. In this scenario what usually works best is a small fast drive (eg Velocirapter or SSD) for OSX/Applications and a large drive for video files. It is not advisable to have the operating system running from a striped array.

    Since you already have the drives, here is what you can do.

    Install one new drive and format the partition you wish to use for OSX. You may not want to use the whole drive for OSX, so make 2 partitions. Be sure that it is GPT-formatted so it can boot.

    Use CarbonCopy Cloner to copy your current OSX partition to the new one.

    Set the startup disk as the new partition.

    Remove the old drive and replace it with the second new one.

    Reboot, and partition/format new drive.



    Hey Cutterman,

    Thanks for the advice. That sounds like a good set-up. I'll have to research the process of doing what you've advised, but, should work out ok:

    You are limited with only 2 drive slots. In this scenario what usually works best is a small fast drive (eg Velocirapter or SSD) for OSX/Applications and a large drive for video files. It is not advisable to have the operating system running from a striped array.

    Since you already have the drives, here is what you can do.

    A. Install one new drive and format the partition you wish to use for OSX. You may not want to use the whole drive for OSX, so make 2 partitions:

    1. Partitions are done under Disc Utilities correct? Never done it before; will take a look.

    B. Be sure that it is GPT-formatted so it can boot.

    2. GPT is also done under Disc Utilities, correct? Here I start to get a bit confused, as I've formatted Extended Journal, SO, the partition with the OSX & Applications is formatted GPT, and the rest of the HD is formatted as Extended Journal?

    C. Use CarbonCopy Cloner to copy your current OSX partition to the new one.

    3. So, I partition the first new HD and use Carbon Copy Cloner (also under Disc Utilities) to copy the OSX & Applications from my original HD to the first new HD, correct?

    D. Set the startup disk as the new partition.

    4. This will be an option when I setup the partition???

    E. Remove the old drive and replace it with the second new one.

    F. Reboot, and partition/format new drive.

    5. QUESTION: So, you recommend not striping the HDs: If I do a RAID 1, which sets up a mirror of the HDs, and since the first new HD is partitioned with the OSX & Applications, AND is set up as the Startup Disk, then the second new HD will also mirror that?? Another QUESTION: Even if the second new HD does not mirror the OSX & Applications, the second HD will only mirror the space/partition not utilized by the OSX & Applications partition, correct?

    Thanks for your help!!

    Jack


    FROM THE CUTTERMAN:

    OK I will try to answer your questions. To begin, if you want to mirror the 2 drives then you will need to boot from the SL install DVD or an external (USB/firewire) drive to set it up. IMO for your purposes it is too much hassle and a waste of HD space.

    1) Yes partitions are created in Disk Utility

    2) Yes, you choose a volume Scheme (ie number of partitions) and size them by dragging the separator bar. Then select the planned boot partition and click Options..., then choose GPT. I think it is usually the default but check and make sure. Extended journaled is the usual format.

    3) You need to download Carbon Copy. It is a free tool that will copy the entire image of your current system partition to the new one and make it bootable. Consider making a donation as it is a very useful and frequently updated utility. It is fairly intuitive to use. You can also use the restore feature in Disk Utility but I have had more experience with Carbon Copy.

    4) Once the copy process is finished the new boot partition will show up under the startup disk selections (this tool is in System Preferences).



    FROM 666Sheep:

    If may i correct one thing: OP, don't choose GPT (GUID Partition Table). You got PPC Mac (G5), so valid partition type for you is Apple Partition Map (APM).
    GPT is for Intel Macs and you will not able to boot from this kind of partition.



    FROM THE CUTTERMAN:

    Thanks for the correction- my bad. No familiarity with non-Intel Macs.
     
  2. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Location:
    Terra
    #2
    What's up with this? It's like 3 replies all in one post...
     
  3. DetroitMacJack thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    #3
    Accidently started Power PC thread under Mac Pros . . .

    Hello iThinkergoiMac,

    Well, the problem is, I have a Power PC (which is not the problem I'm alluding to): the problem is that I started the same thread under Mac Pros, which I discovered at a later date, so, I transfered all the replies to this Power Pc thread. I hope it helps others with G5 Power PCs, and I hope more people will add their recommendations, warnings, expertise and so on, to this thread.

    Rock Soon, Jack
     
  4. DetroitMacJack thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    #4
    Hi All,
    Since this process will come to a head on Tuesday/Wednesday, and I hope to be successful in transferring Old HD data to new HD/s.

    A: I'm still a little foggy here, as I thought I'd set up the 2 new T-gig HDs so that if one of them failed, I'd still have the data backed up on the other HD; more ideas concerning this would be reassuring:

    :confused:WHAT DOES "IMO" mean?
    (IMO for your purposes it is too much hassle and a waste of HD space.)

    As I understand the points made: After I partition the first new HD, and Carbon Copy data from old HD, I then install second new HD, and this will just act as an overflow from the first partitioned HD, correct? Because, if set up a Raid1/Mirror, the OSX partitioned portion of the first new HD will not copy to the second new HD, and that space on the second new HD will be wasted, correct?

    :confused:Also: I have to set up RAID1 (if I do not set up RAID0), correct?
    RAID 1
    From WIKI: RAID 1 mirrors the contents of the disks, making a form of 1:1 ratio real time mirroring. The contents of each disk in the array are identical to that of every other disk in the array. A RAID 1 array requires a minimum of two drives.

    :confused:Carbon Copy is a free tool that will copy the entire image of your current system partition to the new one and make it bootable.
    1. Is my old HD partitioned? Is that done automatically by MAC prior to PC purchase?

    2. Do I Carbon Copy the whole old HD or just parts? (eg. OSX, Photo Shop, After Effects, Various Files)

    3. I read that it is necessary to DEACTIVATE Photo Shop (I have CS3) prior to doing Carbon Copy. Is that correct? If so, does this also apply to other Adobe applications? Such as After Affects, Illustrator??

    Thanks to all for the help!!
     

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