Best way to email illustrator file?

Discussion in 'Design and Graphics' started by summero, May 8, 2007.

  1. summero macrumors regular

    summero

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #1
    I'm new to this graphic design stuff so I would like to know what would be the best way to email a file created in illustrator? Should I just pdf it?
    Thanks in advance :)
     
  2. shecky Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #2
    what is the person you are emailing it to using it for?
     
  3. ezzie macrumors 68020

    ezzie

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    #3
    if you're just sending it for proofing purposes, a PDF of JPG should suffice so the average user can open and view the file.

    now, if you're sending the file for printing, you'll want to send the actual AI or EPS file (check with your printer to see what they need), or, if they don't have Illsutrator, you could probably send a PDF. again, ask what file format they can use.

    welcome to this graphic design stuff. :)
     
  4. summero thread starter macrumors regular

    summero

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #4
    They will be using it to pass on and show to their colleagues.

    Thank you for your help! :)
     
  5. ezekialjazz macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2007
    #6
    Always send the original file in its native format PLUS a PDF.

    I have a stock email which I send to all my clients requesting Pantone referenced artwork in Vector format as time and time again I receive low-res Jpegs or RGB PDFs for litho print.
    I then enter in a game of electronic ping-pong trying to explain the required format to some Secretary/PA/No brain Marketing Guy.

    If you get into the habit of sending both files with a disclaimer that the PDF is a visual and the EPS is a print file that would help us Studio guys further down the line.
     
  6. ezzie macrumors 68020

    ezzie

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    #7
    not for proofing by a client. who wants to field questions from clients asking "why can't i open this other file you sent?"...it's an added headache, IMO.

    the OP's question was which format to send files in for proofing purposes by a client, not for sending to a printer. most folks in the design world that i live in send a JPG of PDF for proofing, then send the final native file via FTP for printing.

    good lord, i'd hope someone who's doing graphic design would know not to send a JPG for final output... :eek:

    i'm no trying to be snarky here...sorry if it comes off that way. i'm way too ready for the weekend. ;)
     
  7. ezekialjazz macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2007
    #8
    good lord, i'd hope someone who's doing graphic design would know not to send a JPG for final output...

    You would be surprised by the amount of low-res jpegs I receive that the supplier believes is print ready.
    My speciality is currency design, so my experience of the 'design world' really is a global one.
    Most of my clients are agents of agents of agents for governments. Due not only to inter-departmental politics but also language barriers it is almost impossible to back-track to the original supplier to get the original file, so I have no choice but to re-draw.
    I don't mind Jpegs as my disclaimer also states that if the artwork is not in vector format I will charge a minimum of X amount for re-drawing :D
     
  8. xfiftyfour macrumors 68030

    xfiftyfour

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    Apr 14, 2006
    Location:
    Clemson, SC
    #9
    Yeah, I gotta say - I think you'd be surprised at just how little most designers know about printing. That's why most printers have prepress departments whose sole job is to get files print-ready (trapping, fixing colors, bleeds, etc).
     
  9. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    #10

    Not in my experience. There are people calling themselves designers, I've met a few, but really they're Photoshop or Illustrator jockeys...

    We won't take anyone on unless they can get a press-ready file together. As well as project and client management, knowing your repro across different media is one of the factors that marks you as a professional. I do all my own object-level trapping, especially on two-colour work before I put my PDFs together, and check the seps like I'm paying for the job myself.
     
  10. xfiftyfour macrumors 68030

    xfiftyfour

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    Apr 14, 2006
    Location:
    Clemson, SC
    #11
    I guess you're lucky cause that's def. NOT the norm.
     
  11. ezekialjazz macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2007
    #12
    I think xfiftyfour and Blue Velvet might have their wires a tad crossed.

    From what I'm reading you guys are in agreement with each other.

    Blue Velvet:
    "I think you'd be surprised at just how little most designers know about printing"

    xfiftyfour:
    "There are people calling themselves designers, I've met a few, but really they're Photoshop or Illustrator jockeys"

    You guys obviously have dealings with design/repro/pre-press/print so your experiences mirror each others.

    I recently completed a 2 year HND in Art & Graphic Design as I like to test myself and I also wanted to see if I could still 'cut the mustard'. I pressumed that there would be a lack of print knowledge on the students part, but not on the tutors too!

    It soon became apparent that some of the students had a great eye and a real talent, but didn't understand basic colour theory. I took it on myself to pass on my print knowledge whenever I could and was approached by the Principal to set up specific classes. Friday became 'Big Daddy's Day'. These classes had good attendance and I paid for the beers at lunch (I wonder if this had anything to do with the attendance?).

    Why 'Big Daddy's Day'? Well, I'm 25 years older than the oldest student in the class. My help certainly paid off for the students and the Principle - the highest achieving group ever, with an average pass rate of merit/distinction level.

    I served a five year apprentice as a lithographic platemaker and printer. I have operated most presses from a Letterpress Platen to a seven tower Miyakoshi. I've had a mac since 1986 and have used every single Mac design application there is. So trust me, the original file is most welcome by me. But if it isn't incuded with the brief, someone is going to pay my hourly rate for redrawing it - and that's enough for a long weekend break in Magaluff!

    Best point raised in this thread? Blue Velvet's comment, produce separations of your work and check them - don't glance at them or assume they are correct.

    Good forum - interesting opinions - keep it up.
     
  12. randomhussy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    #13
    Similar help needed!

    I want to put a PDF portfolio together of a few pages of AI artwork. I want the quality of a vector / AI, but I need to email it so must be under a 1MB. Any ideas? I have tried exporting as different file types like EPS, PDF and JPEGs but nothing seems good enough and small enough. Annoyingly I managed to do it with another set of files, perfectly, but can't remember what I did!:confused:

    Pls pls pls help!!!

    PS I have been working as a children's wear designer for years now, and have never been asked to know anything more about the print process other than the basic different types for fashion. So I guess it's not really necessary unless you are a print graphic designer? Never been random enough to send a jpeg for anything other than a first proof to buyers though, so I don't think it can be the designers, just their receptionists maybe?!:p
     
  13. ChicoWeb macrumors 65816

    ChicoWeb

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Location:
    California
    #14
    Timely bump!

    I would export to PDF, and if it's all vector, you should be able to use the save as option and use the [smallest file size] under Adobe PDF Preset. Should be fine if they are all vector. The minute you throw in a raster image though, that changes.

    Why not just upload it somewhere and send the person to a link?
     
  14. randomhussy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    #15
    Thank you, thought that was probably the only way, just wondered if there was a trick-nique!

    Good point about the upload...
     
  15. covisio macrumors 6502

    covisio

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    #16
    Out of interest, what do you use to do your object-level trapping?
     
  16. jerryrock macrumors 6502

    jerryrock

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2007
    Location:
    Amsterdam, NY
    #17
    I think limiting yourself to a 1mb file size is a mistake. There are many ways to transfer files on the internet and you really should be using something other than email. Most professional graphic services/printers, have a dedicated FTP server for this purpose.

    There are also free or paid services such as yousendit that also serve this function.

    http://www.yousendit.com/
     

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