Best way to keep a MacBook Pro Cool?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by wickedking94, Aug 22, 2012.

  1. wickedking94 macrumors 6502

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    Apr 27, 2010
    #1
    Heat normally isn't a problem for my MacBook Pro but lately the fans are always going non stop. I've reset the power management stuff and all those things and its just going non stop. The temperature in my room where I keep it is about 25 degrees Celsius and according to my temperature monitoring software the CPU temp is at 60 Celsius. Its getting to the point where my computer freezes for a few seconds when I try and do stuff.

    So what methods do you use to keep your MBP cool?
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

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    located
    #2
    60° C are more than acceptable temperatures, MBP CPUs can withstand temps up to 105° C. How old is the MBP and have you cleaned the fan(s) yet?

    Open Activity Monitor and select All Processes and then sort by CPU to show you the process(es) slowing down your Mac or speeding up your fan(s) or causing more heat.
     
  3. BlazednSleepy macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    Ya I suggest looking at your activity monitor.
     
  4. Outkast27 macrumors 6502

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  5. killerrobot macrumors 68020

    killerrobot

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    #5
    I keep mine cool by putting this decal on it.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. skunnykart macrumors regular

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    May 7, 2010
    #6
    I had a heat problem with my old MBP but I just learned to just put up with it.
    Until one day I opened the Unibody to switch out the hdd for a ssd.
    There was a lot of dust in the fan and the fan vents through that slit where your screen hinges on.

    I don't have a heat problem anymore but I'm not sure if it is because I swapped out the hdd for a ssd or if it is because I cleaned out the dust or both or neither.
     
  7. wickedking94, Aug 22, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2012

    wickedking94 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #7
    @skunnykart According to the temperature monitoring software my HDD is only 30 Celsius. I just recently opened my MBP and cleaned the fan, heatsink, and logic board with compressed air. Maybe I should buy those rubber "feet" that prop up laptops so the fan can get more air.

    @Blazed I looked in activity monitor and nothing is using more than 10% CPU or more than 100MB of ram. :/

    @simsalad I've seen videos of people running computers without CPU cooling and once the CPU hit 60 C the computer started crashing so I assumed since mine was freezing at the same temp that it was getting too hot.
    @OutKast27 Really?
    @Killerrobot :) funny.
     
  8. BlazednSleepy macrumors 6502a

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  9. wickedking94 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Apr 27, 2010
    #9
    Yeah my external drive is always plugged in (I do lots of video stuff so I need constant backups)
     
  10. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #10
    What system, and are you running an external monitor?
     
  11. BlazednSleepy macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 15, 2012
    #11
    That's whats causing the fans. My dads 2011 does it as well.
     
  12. SlyMac macrumors 6502

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    Jun 16, 2008
    #12
    Yeah, this seems to be the best solution for creating a cool environment for you and your laptop.
     
  13. wickedking94 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Apr 27, 2010
    #13
    MacBook Pro Mid 2010 13"

    Changes I've made:
    Upgraded the HDD to a 500GB 7200 RPM

    Upgraded the RAM to two 4GB modules

    OS 10.8.0

    And also I am running an external monitor all the time so maybe its the GPU :p
     
  14. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #14
    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)

    If you're not already using it, iStat Pro (free) or iStat Menus ($16) will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level.

    If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC.
    (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  15. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #15
    The temperature you are reporting to me is normal, given you are driving an external monitor. GPU is integrated all the same if you are running two displays, it`s working harder or even a single external of higher resolution than the notebooks built in panel certainly the 15" MBP ramp up the temperature significantly when connected to an external monitor and the discrete GPU is forced on 100%.

    If you are concerned with the temperatures and want to reduce them elevation of the rear of the machine helps, as sitting flat on the desk only reflects the head back to the base of the Mac. You can buy passive aluminium coolers like Rain Designs Mstand or iLap. Most powered coolers are designed for PC notebooks and dont work overly well with Mac`s one cooler that does work efficiently is the Moshi Zefyr 2, as it`s principle of cooling is specifically designed for Apple portables, by blowing the air horizontally across the base of the computer, however don't expect miracles.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Link: Moshi Zefyr 2

    You can use software to override Apple`s own cooling algorithm by manually taking control of fan RPM and setting up power profile presets with SMC Fan Control 2.4, or here with UltraFan which allows you stipulate a preset temperature and the software will automatically raise and lower fan RPM`s to keep the system at the predefined temp, which i personally feel is a far more elegant solution, at the end of the day you want to control your system temperature, not your fan rpm`s. For me SMC is now pretty much redundant with the latest release of UltraFan having manual control of the fans, and i am starting to uninstall it from my own Mac`s. SMC FC was a great app, however it is no longer frequently updated and very much superseded.

    Strictly speaking Apple`s own cooling algorithm works, albeit at sacrifice of increased temps for quieter operation, this has always been the Apple way and is really nothing detrimental to the systems, i have one MBP from 2008 all original barring a recent fan change that has an uptime of over 30K hours. The latest MBP`s need less assistance in remaining cool; for some it`s simply disconcerting the heat generated and transferred to the case, although it`s perfectly normal as the aluminium acts as a heat-sync. i have to deal with elevated ambient temperature so at times a software solution is useful. Apart from the passive cooling the Mstands bring they also offer a very sound ergonomic solution. A cooler and UltraFan will maximise the cooling, there is little else you can do short of reducing the ambient temperature or the system load. If I know i am going to push a system i will close all apps that are not essential as this can and does make an impact to system temperature.

    High temperature in general is not overly harmful to your systems, what is far more detrimental is thermal stress, when temperatures rapidly fluctuate by significant margins in a short period of time. Anyone striving for longevity should look to minimise rapid fluctuation of temperature.

    The old adage still applies; it`s easier to keep a system cool, than cool-down an already hot machine. This being said it`s not strictly necessary, equally it`s nice to know that there are options for reducing temperature.
     
  16. SlyMac macrumors 6502

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    Jun 16, 2008
    #16
    Man, the 15" version is 80.00, Seems a little pricey for the small gains you might see. I think that the mstand or something similar would be better from a cost vs reward standpoint.
     
  17. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #17
    Realistically yes, i have both, and a cheap USB fan stratigically placed can have the same effect. The Zefyr you are also paying for a cooler built to a similar spec as the Mac being predominantly aluminium, you just need to get a horizontal flow across the base to help reduce temps. FWIW i also use a USB powered fan, i use the Zefyr when i travel as it helps to cool and sets the MBP at a better angle.

    Highly recommend the Mstand, helps with passive cooling, improves ergonomics albeit at the cost of a keyboard and trackpad, and it may just be your best investment in the event of a spill ;)
     
  18. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    Atlanta
    #18
    If you use external keyboard, mouse, and monitor, put the MBP into a Book Arc so the MBP radiates heat in all directions.
     
  19. SlyMac macrumors 6502

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    #19
    As do I. I've had mine for about 2 weeks and love it. I use a samsung monitor on a mount so I have the macbook sitting off to the side. Most of the time its in clamshell mode but it has good ergonomics for when I need to extend the desktop.
     
  20. wickedking94 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Apr 27, 2010
    #20
    Well I think I've got a better understanding of how this all works now.
    Thanks to everyone who replied, it was all very informative.

    I think for now I'll just get some rubber "feet" that my local electronics store sell to prop up my MBP to let it circulate air better.

    I already reset my SMC a few months ago since my fans were going non stop even without it being warm.

    I'm glad to know it takes over 100 Celsius to do any damage to the components.
     
  21. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #21
    Actually, over 100C won't damage components. If it goes above 105C, it will shut down to prevent damage.
     

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