Best Way to Send Large Files

Discussion in 'macOS' started by kkachurak, Nov 25, 2008.

  1. kkachurak macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2007
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    #1
    I'm working on a video project in which it is necessary to send large chunks of video back and forth (500mb up to 4gb).

    So far, we've been using iDisk, and it's painful. It's dreadfully slow and times out occasionally.

    Is there a way to simply connect to each others Mac using Leopard? If we have the ISP information? I'm new at this, so I'm not too sure of what information we'd need.

    Or maybe there is software?
     
  2. jmann macrumors 604

    jmann

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    #2
    if the mac are close near each other you can hook them together with a firewire cable.
     
  3. applefan69 macrumors 6502a

    applefan69

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    #3
    Ahh... be glad your using a mac, one of the least appreciated beauties of OS X is it can work as a FTP server right out of regular install :)

    its simple, go to your settings, and choose the "Sharing" preference pane.

    Next click "File Sharing" check mark. Now the file sharing should be working, and by giving the other user the URL your mac will give you. That user will be able to connect to your mac using your log-in info (for simplicities sake)

    It should be fairly straight forward from there

    you will probably have to do some port forwarding on your router (assuming you use a router) otherwise transfer speed will be very slow. Sorry i dont know enoguh to help you wiht the port forwarding, I suggest you google it, or wait for another user to help you
     
  4. kkachurak thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 26, 2007
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    #4
    Haha, not quite. My Mac Pro is in Orlando, FL and his Mac Pro is in Los Angeles, CA. I wish. Firewire would be so simple ;)

    This is precisely the part I can't get past. I have file sharing turned on and it says this:

    "Other users can access shared folders on this computer, and administrators all volumes, at afp://10.0.1.200/ or "Taxfree".

    That ISP seems very generic. That can't be me, can it?

    I'm connected to the Internet via ethernet to the Airport Base Station, which connects to the Internet via the cable modem. So I guess I'll have to do what AppleFan69 called port forwarding.

    Any help with that? Bueller?
     
  5. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #5
    Good call -- that is you, but only on the intranet. Not on the public internet. In order to use FTP you have to expose the computers to the public internet, e.g. by port forwarding or putting them in the DMZ of your router.

    You might also look at using file sharing types of tools. Microsoft Foldershare for instance is made for tasks like this, except right now the largest files it can handle are 2GB.
     
  6. Guiyon macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Location:
    North Shore, MA
    #6
    SCP would work fairly well and be easy to setup (SCP comes enabled out of the box) but would be a bit insecure unless you set things up properly; FTP would be better but it gets even more complex. The only problem is all of these need some sort of configuration on your router to properly redirect the correct traffic to your computer. Depending on your speed and your ISP's policies this may not be feasible in the long run, especially if the files are around 4GB; if you are on a common home connection (<1.5mbps upstream) this will take good couple of hours. If you don't need to exchange files that often and are relatively close a sneakernet might be your best option.
     
  7. kkachurak thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 26, 2007
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    #7
    Yes, I think this is what I need/want to do. I'm thrilled about the idea of OS X just inherently being able to take care of this. I just need to get around the complicated details.

    How exactly do I port forward? Or, I should start with, what in the heck is DMZ of my router? :rolleyes:

    I really appreciate it.
     
  8. applefan69 macrumors 6502a

    applefan69

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    #8
    DMZ if im not mistaken stands for:
    de-materialized zone
    im not entirely sure what it does.. i think it has smoemthing to do with your router not providing ANY firewall/protection ot the chosen computer, causing that computer to be completely in the open, and susceptible to the internet, but it also saves you from the complications routers can cause.

    Port forwarding, is well essentially the SECURE but complicated way to do thins with a router. In summary to port forward you are telling the router that CERTAIN connections from the internet are to be DIRECTLY FORWARDED to the chosen computer (your computer)

    the complication in this, is knowing exactly which connections must be forwarded (Cause you cant forward them all)

    you'll need to do some research to see whcih ports must be open/forwarded (or wait for a ncie member to do that research for you) then depending on your router, the way you set port forwarding up will differ. This is another case where you'll need to search google.

    Im sorry this is a difficult process, but really it has to be, otherwise things would be very insecure. Its only complex the first time you do it (i remember first time i tried setting some ports to be forwarded up... I couldnt even figure out how to create a static IP :p) I can look back at those times now and laugh though, because its become MUCH easier.
     
  9. juanster macrumors 68020

    juanster

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Location:
    toronto
    #9
    Im' not too savvy on this. and maybe this may sound stupid, maybe not, but if either one of you have one, or maybe even get one if this is used a lot, a website, just web hosted by any company just upload it to the the server and let him/her know or give her/him a user password and then he/she can get it straight from teh server??? athst what i do with my friend when we send each other large files...
     
  10. applefan69 macrumors 6502a

    applefan69

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    Location:
    Medicine Hat
    #10
    That would be even slower... and just as complicated

    It doesnt make sense to use up a server so you can upload a file, then download it.

    When you can directly transfer it, when set up correctly.

    you dont sound stupid, your wasnt a bad one, it will just make things more difficult.
     
  11. BobZune macrumors 6502a

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    Oct 26, 2007
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    USA
    #11
  12. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

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    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #12
    Most video editors just send hard drives backwards and forwards to each other. Using the internet seems ridiculous for such large files unless you have a fibre optic connection or similar.

    Seeing as a cheap external hard drive is reasonably cheap it seems like the most cost effective and speedy method.
     
  13. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #13
    So, sorry, DMZ = De-militarized zone. Think about Korea, which is the place where you usually hear about DMZs. The DMZ is the strip of land that is monitored by both sides but isn't occupied by either, in between the US/SKorea line and the NKorea line. The idea of a DMZ for a router is basically that the router can pick one computer and essentially fully expose it to the internet. The advantage is that it's much easier to set up than port forwarding. The way it works with Apple's routers is that you turn on DMZ, specify a DMZ IP address (something outside the DHCP range -- so it would never get randomly assigned by the AEBS to a new client ... typically something like 10.0.1.201, whereas all your clients are normally 10.0.1.1-10.0.1.100). Then, instead of using DHCP to get an IP address on the computer you want exposed, you set the computer to manually obtain an IP address, namely the one you specified as the DMZ. Then, any incoming calls on your public IP address go straight to that computer.

    This can in principle be dangerous, because attack calls from the outside can now reach that computer. But if you either have your services turned off or use a firewall, the danger is essentially minimal.

    Only one computer can occupy the DMZ of a network, I believe, which is also a consideration. But it simplifies configuration/

    Whichever computer(s) you want to be able to SERVE files have to be exposed in this manner (i.e. if computer A is in its DMZ and computer B is behind the NAT, like a normal client, on another router, then B can ftp to A, but A cannot ftp to B).

    I know that this all sounds fairly complicated, and I have to say that, honestly, this is not a beginner / intuitively obvious process, even with Apple hardware. That's actually a significant part of why things like Windows Live Foldershare excite interest -- besides the fact that they live sync folders, a lot of these programs can automatically use advanced techniques to bypass the need for port forwarding.

    I do kind of agree with Cromulent, also. This will be fine if you're going to just do nightly file transfers (i.e. let the two computers transfer overnight), although it will waste rather a lot of electricity just to get a file transfered. Sending HD's back and forth is a good option. If you usually only have a few gigs of data to send at a time, even DVD-R's are not a bad option -- in the US, postage for one of those in a mailer is not too bad -- maybe just $2.
     
  14. Tex-Twil macrumors 68020

    Tex-Twil

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Location:
    Europe
    #14
    Hi,
    I've just tested the sharing via the built in FTP server but I'm missing some options. Can I create a ftp user only without having to create a new user in OSX and assign the folder to this ftp user ?

    Thanks,
    Tex
     
  15. Tex-Twil macrumors 68020

    Tex-Twil

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    Europe
  16. Xavier macrumors 68020

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    Mar 23, 2006
    Location:
    Columbus
    #16
    I just connect my two macs with an ethernet cable and connect to the given IP address
     
  17. Thorbjorn macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    #17
    This may not be what you need, but I often use yousendit.com to send larger files. The thing is, it looks as though their maximum file size, even for paid accounts, is 2 gigs, so likely won't work for you.
     
  18. Bill P. macrumors regular

    Bill P.

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    #18
    Can MobileMe (and a secure website created within MM) handle this kind of thing?
     
  19. jmann macrumors 604

    jmann

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    #19
    I suggested a similar idea with firewire, but if you notice their computers aren't close to each other. :( Makes things more complicated
     
  20. sOwL macrumors 6502

    sOwL

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Location:
    Nerd Cave
    #20
    You could give Dropbox a shot, its a "shared folders" application that works on many operating systems. I dont think it allows you to send bigger files than 2gb though :S

    Also, you could use hamachiX to create an eLAN and then use the intranet adress you got.
     
  21. Tex-Twil macrumors 68020

    Tex-Twil

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    May 28, 2008
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    #21
    hmm, both look interesting. Do you have any experience with them ?
     
  22. sOwL macrumors 6502

    sOwL

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    #22
    yes im using both of them
     
  23. Matari macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    #23
    Or you could subscribe to mediafire - free for up to 100mb, but $6.95 per month for up to 10gb - http://www.mediafire.com/mediapro.php?reason=size


     
  24. Mal macrumors 603

    Mal

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2002
    Location:
    Orlando
    #24
    If you have MobileMe, and you're using the same account (no idea if you are), why not just turn on Back to my Mac? It'll accomplish all of those things people have been describing, and since it's a direct connection to other computer, no slow downs like the iDisk.

    There's some ports that you need to make sure are open on the router and someone more experienced could probably fill you in, but overall it's a very easy setup.

    jW
     
  25. DealsMcClure macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2009
    #25
    Swap it! Encrypt it! - New File Transfer Service

    http://www.swapitencryptit.com is the, cheapest, easiest and fastest way to send large files on line. I didn't have to sign up or buy a monthly package! All I did was pick the file size I wanted to send, paid accordingly, and sent the file(with no further obligations). I found out just recently that Swap it! Encrypt it! isn't just for home computers but for mobile devices (iPhone, BlackBerry) too!
    yousendit.com was okay for a while, but they really rape you financially...
     

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