Beware of Apple Care w/ Education Discount UK

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by RJCP, Feb 6, 2014.

  1. RJCP, Feb 6, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2014

    RJCP macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    #1
    Hi guys, just thought I'd give you all a heads up regarding discrepancies in the price of Apple Care with Educational Discount in the UK: it just happened to my partner and it sucks!

    When he got his Macbook in the Apple Store with his discount he didn't have enough money to purchase Apple Care on the spot as well. It would have cost him around 50£ but he was told he could get it at any time during the 1 year warranty.

    He then went to buy it separately a couple of months later, THROUGH HIS UNI network and the price was roughly 170£. We enquired further and it seems you only get the 50£ price IF you buy it straight away with the computer and we weren't informed of this. It's really really bad!
     
  2. chetzar macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2013
    #2
    Years ago when I added Apple Care to my BlackBook before the 1 year was up, Apple actually called me because I had used my warranty and asked if I wanted to add 2 more years of Apple Care. They gave me the Education Discount at that time.
     
  3. RJCP thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jun 8, 2011
    #3
    The main issue is that there are 2 prices under the Educational Discount... If you buy AppleCare with the device it's +/- 50£, but when you buy it later even with educational discount, it's a whooping 170£.
     
  4. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

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    Location:
    NYC
    #4
    Your friend should have just called Apple to buy the AppleCare.
     
  5. rex450se macrumors regular

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    Apr 9, 2011
    Location:
    Independence, MO
    #5
    I don't believe this is true in the US thankfully. I have purchased the AppleCare at a later date on every Mac I have owned. Both at an Apple Store and at authorized resellers, and got the education pricing at all of them.

    Victor
     
  6. Lefty21 macrumors regular

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    Aug 6, 2012
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    #6
    I've never heard of AppleCare for a MacBook only being 50£, with or without a student discount, no matter when it was purchased.
    170£ sounds about right, and that is still a significant discount from the regular price. I don't know where your friend heard 50£ but I doubt it was for AppleCare.
     
  7. RJCP thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jun 8, 2011
    #7
    Well, having asked around, when you buy your computer in store with a student ID, if you buy it with apple care, the education discount makes Apple Care only cost 48£, but you only get that price when you:

    1) buy the computer in a retail store + Apple Care showing your student ID
    2) buy the computer via your University Intranet + Apple Care

    If you buy apple care afterwards, you still get a discount but it's not nearly as high (the total cost is 157£). This really sucks. They shouldn't have 2 different discounts especially considering that, as students, you may not have those 48£ to spend on the day in which case they screw you and charge you an extra 110£ later on.
     
  8. Lefty21 macrumors regular

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    Aug 6, 2012
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    Lexington, KY
    #8
    Interesting, must be a Europe thing - we're not quite so lucky here in the US. :cool:
     
  9. Wuiffi macrumors 6502a

    Wuiffi

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    Oct 6, 2011
    #9
    not Europe. No such thing here in Austria, seems to be Great Britain only
     
  10. striker33 macrumors 65816

    striker33

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    Aug 6, 2010
    #10
    Should have just ordered it online. The 3 year AppleCare WARRANTY is free of charge.

    Not that it matters much anyway. We're fortunate enough to be covered by EU regulations, meaning that even without AppleCare, if your MacBook developed a fault within say 5 years, you could still claim a free replacement or repair. 5 years is a reasonable amount of time to expect one of these things to last, so as long as you can prove the fault developed because of a faulty part, they have to replace/repair it free of charge. Obviously if you tried to do this over the phone, they'd likely charge you shipping costs etc, but can't do that in store.

    Same thing goes for things like TVs etc over here as well. Infact Apple's UK website even acknowledges that you get 2 years worth of coverage by default now for things like iPhones and iPads, but still try to sell you AppleCare by including accidental cover (which you have to pay £69 excess for each claim, I might add).
     
  11. Rocketpaul macrumors regular

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    Aug 3, 2012
    Location:
    London
    #11
    Yes i have heard we are entitled to two years under EU law but I'm curious how you would claim for it, surely apple store employees will just say you didn't buy apple care so you will have to pay for repairs.
     
  12. striker33 macrumors 65816

    striker33

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    Aug 6, 2010
    #12
    You just bring up the sales of goods act. They have no ground to stand on if the fault was caused by something in the manufacturing process which, as long as you haven't opened up or damaged the device, will always be the case.

    They only just recently changed stances to acknowledge the 2 year EU regulation for gadgets, but they are very reluctant to tell their customers about it for obvious (greedy) reasons.

    It's the main reason so many european countries are suing them.
     
  13. RJCP thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jun 8, 2011
    #13
    However, I'm assuming that if you take something for repair to one of their retail stores that you've purchased via their Online Store after the 1 year warranty was over and claim sale of goods act (according to which the second year is with the seller), they'll probably try to charge you for it because it was purchased via the online store. They'd probably claim that that the Apple Online Store and the Apple Retail Store are different things.

    EDIT: In case they try to do that, here's what their website says: "Consumers who purchased Apple-branded or non-Apple-branded products at an Apple Retail Store or the Apple Online Store may claim against Apple"
     
  14. The Mercurian macrumors 65816

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    Mar 17, 2012
    #14
    Its a UK only thing. Some deal between their higher education authority type folks and Apple on a national level.
     
  15. Barney63, Feb 6, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2014

    Barney63 macrumors 6502a

    Barney63

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    Jan 9, 2014
    Location:
    Bolton, UK.
    #15
    The 2 year european warranty only covers faults that were inherent at the time of purchase.
    I had an iPhone 5 that crashed on doing the iOS7 update, it wouldn't come out of recovery mode. The genius bar tried all sorts with it but it was still stuck. The 12 month warranty had just run out (by 5 weeks), they told me to go to my contract supplier EE and try to claim under the 2 year warranty, EE refused because I could not prove the fault was there when originally purchased. I went back to Apple and told them, they ended up agreeing to extend the warranty to cover the fix as an act of good faith. They did however say that the 2 year warranty would not cover it. They did give me a new phone though.

    Barney

    PS The reason they wouldn't cover it was also because it wasn't purchased directly from them.
     
  16. RJCP thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jun 8, 2011
    #16
    But that's always the case: 1st year with manufacturer or reseller; 2nd year with reseller. If you buy from Apple they're both the manufacturer and the reseller, so I guess they'll have to honor it.
     
  17. 5to1, Feb 14, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014

    5to1 macrumors regular

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    Mar 9, 2008
    #17
    If only it were that simple :/

    In principle, yes we do have statutory protection under the Sale of Goods Act (SOGA) from inherent defects, which means we have a right of redress against the retailer should the product fail and not last a "reasonable time" due to an inherent defect (upto a maximum of 5 years).

    There are 3 key points, which anyone that has tried to enforce these rights will have probably experienced sooner or later, to make them realise its not quite as clear cut as those posting on forums suggest:

    1) The failure has to be due to an inherent fault. Within the first 6 months, the onus is on the retailer to prove it was not an inherent fault. After this its up to the consumer (YOU) to PROVE it WAS an INHERENT FAULT. And no, simply stating the product is sealed, therefore it must be an inherent fault will not be sufficient proof (unless the retailer is feeling particularly generous) LOL

    2) SOGA applies between you the consumer and the retailer, not the manufacturer or anyone else. If the retailer is no longer trading you're SOL. If the retailer is unscrupulous (DSG group for example) you're likely SOL unless you fancy taking them to small claims court :/

    3) SOGA does not define "reasonable time". It places a maximum length of liability as 5 years, many people confuse this as the definition of the length of "reasonable time", IT IS NOT. It will be up to you to argue what a reasonable time is, so for example if you've had your laptop on 24/7 for 19 months downloading torrents, that could very well be considered a reasonable time for the product to have lasted.

    If you have the time, inclination and technical expertise (to prove an inherent fault, either yourself or pay an engineer) the SOGA provides excellent protection. In many instances you will be forced to take the retailer to court and the onus will be on YOU to prove the fault was inherent (after the first 6 months) and what one would consider a reasonable life time for the product.

    NOTE: it is still less then most warranties which will cover ANY defect, not just INHERENT DEFECTS, usually without quibble. Additionally I would strongly advise purchasing using a credit card (CC), as the Consumer Credit Act (CCA) then applies (for purchases over £100), under which your rights are even stronger. Moreover, the credit provider is jointly liable, so if the retailer goes bump (or tells you to get lost), you can exercise your SOGA rights agains the CC provider :)

    I'll give you a short real world example:

    My friend bought a Samsung LCD TV. A couple of years in, it started to show failed lines across the display. It was out of warranty by this point, but he took it back to the retailer on my advice, quoting SOGA (I won't bore you with the blurb). They told him not their problem (they didn't believe it was an inherent fault).

    I had one of my engineers examine it (I run an embedded design company) who confirmed my initial diagnosis the ACF tape had failed, likely due to incorrect application during manufacture (usually the issue given the displayed fault). I called the retailer giving them the engineers reports and they then changed their stance to the product had lasted a reasonable time. At this point my friend had two options, take them to court or buy a new TV. Fortunately he bought it using a CC, so I chased them on his behalf and they agreed to cover him under the SOGA. But it was a long drawn out process and in many instances the CC provider could have taken the same line.

    I'm not saying one should buy an extended warranty, nor am I saying one shouldn't try to exercise their rights under the SOGA. I'm just providing a more realistic appraisal of your rights under the SOGA so one can choose the level of indemnification they require. As opposed to:


    A 3 year manufacturer warranty like the HE warranty trumps the SOGA hands down, so it very much does matter. If you can get it for free, one would have to be an idiot to suggest it doesn't matter since you're covered by the SOGA anyway :/

    And this is coming from someone who has the technical expertise and a reasonable grasp on whats required to enforce ones statutory rights. If you had to find out about the SOGA on a forum and couldn't diagnose a fault as inherent or not without paying someone to do it for you, whats the likelihood when it comes to crunch time you will actually follow through and not just eat the loss?
     
  18. 5to1, Feb 14, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014

    5to1 macrumors regular

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    Mar 9, 2008
    #18
    Also my understanding of the HE warranty is as follows:

    Apple Care: 3 Years Hardware warranty + 3 Years Telephone support

    HE store online order: 3 Years Hardware warranty + 1 Years Telephone support. You can pay the additional £48 to get the extra 2 years Telephone support.

    HE store in store: I believe its the same as online, but other people have suggested you only get the 3 years HW warranty if you buy £48 Apple Care. We've only purchased in store once (usually BTO) and were told the same thing by the "GENIUS", so we just paid the £48 just to be sure. Subsequently I called Apple to complain as I thought the "GENIUS" had essentially sold us the additional 2 years telephone support, which we didn't need/want. They refunded the £48 and the status reverted to 3yrs HW + 1yr Tel on the machine.

    But I'm not sure if this means HE online and In Store is the same, or they did this as I stated I'd looked up online first and it clearly stated 3 Yrs HW warranty. So perhaps they took my argument to mean I would have ordered online if I'd known it was any different in store. It wasn't very clear so I'd strongly advise calling them before wondering into a store to clarify.

    If it is the case that 3 years only applies to online, just purchase online. As I've said before you'd have to be mad to ignore 2 more years of HW warranty for free. I'm sure many of you will have a student in the family somewhere who can get you the discount and the warranty :)

    NOTE: I've read on some forums that the online HE store warranty only applies to some institutions now. So make sure you check under the warranty section before submitting your order. I just got my rMBP and the 3 year HW warranty was applicable on my friends HE store. It took about a week to show up against my machine (for the first week it was showing 1 Yr warranty), so be patient.
     
  19. elviorion macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2014
    Location:
    Wisconsin, USA
    #19
    When I purchased my Pro earlier this week I also was unable to buy the apple care at the time of purchase. I spoke with the reps at apple who said I could buy it at any time during the year and get it for the same educational price. No worries on this in the US...It's nice that you have stores that so deeply discount applecare for you, the store that is local to me is not really an official apple store and can't even give student discounts sadly. The nearest true apple store is around 4 hours away
     
  20. amoda macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2006
    #20
    Are you aware that a laptop purchased online, or via the phone, using the student discount already comes with a 3 year hardware warranty?

    The £50 add-on is solely for telephone support, which you may never even use.

    So UK Higher Education warranty: 3 years hardware, 1 year phone
    +£50= regular AppleCare: 3 years hardware, 3 years phone.

    I believe the rules stipulate that for the discounted price it has to be purchased at the same time as the laptop, otherwise it's full price and definitely NOT worth it.
     
  21. Barney63 macrumors 6502a

    Barney63

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    Jan 9, 2014
    Location:
    Bolton, UK.
    #21
    From the UK Apple Education Store
    Barney
     
  22. 5to1 macrumors regular

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    Mar 9, 2008
    #22
    I think he got it in store, not online/phone. I've read people suggesting you don't get the 3Yr HW warranty if you purchase in store, unless you also take Apple Care. I think that's wrong as per my experience. Agree that the extra 2 years tel support is definitely not worth it.
     
  23. sheareb macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    #23
    I was told the same thing when I bought my ramp - when I went back to purchase a month after buying my laptop I was told the higher price. I stood my ground and got the discount. I would complain on the basis of the false info you were given and see what happens.
     
  24. SCOLANATOR macrumors 6502a

    SCOLANATOR

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    Jul 3, 2013
    Location:
    UK
    #24
    I ordered through my uni network at the start of November for my new rMBP, got 15% off and a completely free 3 year warranty as standard, didn't have to chose or do anything. :)

    Also they sent me a confirmation letter about the warranty which will last until late 2016 a week or so later :)
     
  25. davidjearly macrumors 68020

    davidjearly

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    #25
    Nothing to be shocking about. It's called a purchase incentive, and it's always been the case since I bought my first Mac with student discount back in 2004.

    The fact that students get any discount is already excellent. There's nothing to complain about here.
     

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