Bootcamp = bad

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by ninjapenguinart, May 20, 2008.

  1. ninjapenguinart macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    #1
    How come if you create a bootcamp partition, and you go and re-partition your OS X partition you make the bootcamp partition unbootable? I mean what are the side effects if I install XP with out using bootcamp?
     
  2. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #2
    You can use Fusion or Parallels without Boot Camp and install XP

    It is just slower than running native

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  3. ninjapenguinart thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    #3
    Yeah but the only reason why I want XP is for graphic intensive programs *cough* games *cough* because is there really any other reason to have XP? I don't know I just felt like venting and I will probably find a way if I research through google some more. I mean I have read people do it with out using bootcamp before, but I don't know if there are any side effects though.
     
  4. dgdosen macrumors 65816

    dgdosen

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2003
    Location:
    Seattle
    #4
    Think of it this way: The OS looks at the hard drive like the completely full parking lot at Disneyland. Next you rearrange every car in the parking lot, and lop off a portion of the parking lot to boot. And you now expect to find your car in said parking lot?
     
  5. thejadedmonkey macrumors 604

    thejadedmonkey

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Location:
    Pa
    #5
    yeah, I do. It's not cars, it's partitions. That's more like shuffling about parking lots, eg; parking lot a, parking lot b, etc...

    If I'm running XP and Vista, and go into XP and split it into 10 partitions, Vista will now see 10 new partitions. and XP will still boot!

    That's just bad programming on Apple's part. I don't see how you can defend it.
     
  6. brodeur macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    #6
    thing is, despite all the intel-chip business and stuff that has made macs compatible with windows, mac os x still uses a different file system from windows. they speak a completely different data language, so it comes to no surprise to me that there is the occasional hiccup in trying to get them to communicate.

    windows XP thinks the rest of my hard-drive is blank. it completely doesn't understand my mac partition's file system. however, mac os x understands my windows partition perfectly and i can drag files between the two as i please...
     
  7. The General macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    #7
    There are two parts of "Bootcamp."

    1. /Appications/Utilities/Bootcamp Assistant.app which does nothing but simple partitioning. It shrinks your Mac OS X partition and creates a FAT32 partition. If you choose to do your partitioning with something else, you'll get the same problems with the drive becoming unbootable.

    2. Drivers, which are on your Mac OS X Leopard disc. Without these, your hardware will be unsupported in Windows and you will be unable to play games or do pretty much anything.
     
  8. ninjapenguinart thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    #8
    Yeah what I ended up doing was sucking it up since I hadn't done much on XP just downloaded a few demos. So I used the bootcamp utility to make my partition whole again. Then I went and just did 3 partitions, and just installed XP on one of them and I am using it now and it seems to work. I don't know, I think bootcamp is just for people who don't understand that Windows run on NTFS/FAT32, but since HFS+ cannot write to a NTFS, they have bootcamp create a FAT32 partition.
     
  9. SilverSIsedaN macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    #9
    If I have a macbook (White w/ super drive), can I get boot camp and how?
     
  10. FocusAndEarnIt macrumors 601

    FocusAndEarnIt

    Joined:
    May 29, 2005
    #10
    if you have leopard, it's in applications -> utilities.
     

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