Bootcamp Only vs Bootcamp with VMware or Parallels?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by jaybar, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. jaybar macrumors 6502a

    jaybar

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    #1
    Hi

    I am running Windows 10 Pro in Bootcamp. is there any advantage to running VMware or Parallels with the Bootcamp partition? Or is it better to natively run Bootcamp? I am only using Windows to access my work documents and work calendar. Nothing very heavy.

    Thanks
     
  2. chscag macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    #2
    For what you're using Win 10 for, it probably would be better to use virtual software instead of Boot Camp. Running Win natively should be reserved for gaming or graphic intensive software. However, since you already have Boot Camp installed I would leave things alone. If it's not broke... :)
     
  3. cycledance Suspended

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2010
    #3
    ...BREAK IT!!!!!! :mad:
     
  4. tyche macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2010
    #4
    The biggest advantage running your bootcamp partition inside VMware/Parallels is you remain inside OS X to do your Mac stuff at the same time.
     
  5. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    #5
    As tyche has stated the biggest advantage to using virtualization is that you won't have to reboot your computer. From the sounds of it, you may benefit from doing this.

    I have been using vmWare Fusion with my bootcamp drive for a long time and have been very happy with it.
     
  6. jaybar thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jaybar

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    #6
    I only need to access Bootcamp a few times a month. Does this change your suggestion to run VMware?
     
  7. throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #7
    If you're just doing work documents and calendar, you probably don't want bootcamp; use fusion or virtual box or similar.

    Why? You'll save a heap of space, be able to run Windows at the same time as OS X, etc.

    Boot-camp requires you to partition your disk and pre-allocate plenty of space. Virtualising via Fusion or similar, you can thin provision the space for the VM and it will only use as much as it really needs.

    edit:
    By the above i mean no bootcamp partition. You'd need to back up your windows files, reinstall into a VM and restore your files. Alternatively, i think fusion can migrate a bootcamp partition into a VM file, then you could get rid of boot-camp.
     
  8. garirry macrumors 68000

    garirry

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2013
    Location:
    Canada is my city
    #8
    Unless your computer is VERY weak or you're doing something like playing games or video editing (something heavy), VMWare Fusion or Parallels will work perfectly fine.
     
  9. jaybar thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jaybar

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    #9
    I have a one TB hard drive on my iMac. It's a little more than 2 years old. I've used 100 GB of storage space. I could easily accommodate a Bootcamp partition if it would be advantageous to have one?
     
  10. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    #10
    This really depends on you... Do you feel that being able to avoid rebooting your computer in to Windows a few times a month justifies the cost of purchasing vmWare Fusion?

    Also, you may want to try out VirtualBox which is free from Oracle. It lacks the ability to boot from your Bootcamp partition so you will have to install Windows again but it's hard to argue with its price.
     
  11. throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #11
    The only advantages to bootcamp are 3d performance really.

    There are several advantages to NOT having a bootcamp partition, and virtualization instead:
    1. snapshots - you can take a snapshot of a virtual machine and roll back, so you can maintain a snapshot of a "clean" version of Windows to roll back to. good idea to do this before installing software. snapshots are definitely worth it, and won't work with a bootcamp partition.
    2. cut/paste between OS X and Windows
    3. you're more likely to contain specific tasks to Windows (or OS X) and not be tempted to use the OS for things you shouldn't. e.g., browsing the web with a non-patched Windows machine (because you only spin it up occasionally) because it is convenient because it happens to be the OS you are booted into
     

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